The N’ko Alphabet: Then and Now

Dianne White Oyler. The History of the N'ko Alphabet and Its Role in Mande Transnational Identity. Words as Weapons.
Dianne White Oyler. The History of the N’ko Alphabet and Its Role in Mande Transnational Identity. Words as Weapons. Cherry Hill, N.J. : Africana Homestead Legacy, 2005, 2007. xiv, 241 p. : ill., map

Dianne White Oyler
Dianne White Oyler

Dianne White Oyler’s article on the N’ko Alphabet   includes my contextual annotations and corrections. The paper appeared in 2001, four years before the same author’s book named The History of the N’ko Alphabet and Its Role in Mande Transnational Identity. Words as Weapons. I focus here on the article below, which Dianne wrote based on her fieldwork in Conakry and Kankan, back in 1994. As the saying goes one is entitled to one’s opinion but not to one’s facts, lest they are the “alternative facts”  per Ms. Kellyanne Conway now infamous TV statement. In this case, it is normal and routine  to study and even support cultural activism and language revival efforts around the world. However, does such an activity and commitment permit to publish fabricated facts or falsifications of the historical record? I don’t think so. Dianne correctly points out that “Sékou Touré’s archival documents, including personal papers and correspondence, were either destroyed or hidden after his death. Consequently, there are no currently existing archives of the First Republic and the papers that are hidden are inaccessible.” However, it is counterproductive to try to fill in that void with superficial documents and inaccurate information. Such a shortcut circumvents academic deontology. Worse, it ends up hurting the cause championed, here the N’ko Alphabet. And it lowers considerably the quality and the value of the output. That explains —but does not justify— why Dianne’s article “A cultural revolution in Africa:  literacy in the Republic of Guinea since independence” is replete  with errors and exaggerations. Again, I react contextually below on those shortcomings.
That said, and for the record, my track record in the Guinea national language debate dates back to the mid-1970s. I was then a young faculty in the Linguistics and African Languages department of the School of Humanities and Social Sciences. I also headed the Pular section of the Academy of National Languages, in close collaboration with a competent and elder deputy in the person of  the late Mamadou Gangue (a survivor of the “Teachers Plot”). The work environment was quite collegial, and I was great professional rapport with the head of the Sosokui section, the late Kanfory Bangoura.
In 1975 I wrote a lengthy descriptive and analytical paper titled “La politique linguistique du Parti démocratique de Guinée,” in Miriya, Revue des Sciences économiques et sociales, of which I was co-publisher with Bailo Teliwel Diallo. My article generated positive verbal comments from my colleagues, Yolande Joseph-Nöelle, for example, and from her husband, Senainon Béhanzin, the de facto intellectual guru of Sékou Touré
During the 2010 presidential election campaign, relying heavily on the Maninka electorate of Haute-Guinée, the RPG candidate, Alpha Condé, vowed his support for the ongoing N’ko campaign. He subsequently “won” the second round. But his regime did little to translate the promises into funded programs. Having managed to gain a second term in 2015, Mr. Condé does not give cultural activities the priority they deserve. His former deputy, the late Ahmed Tidiane Cissé, lamented the lack of governmental support for his ministry of culture.… In sum, N’ko has not fared  well under any of the three Maninka presidents of Guinea: Sékou Touré, Sékouba Konaté and Alpha Condé. Ditto for the heritage of each of the other 15 ethnic cultures of the country.
See also my article “The cultural policy of the PDG.” and “Are Fulɓe Disappearing? And Is Adlam Their Savior?
Overall, I was an active participant-observer of cultural life under the dictatorship of Sékou Touré. For instance, I was a prominent member of the National Film Censorship Commission (1971-1981). We screened, discussed, authorized or rejected movies imported for distribution around the country. Given the nature of the police-state the pro-bono function was not risk-free. Thus, in August 1978 Sékou Touré admonished the sub-commission I led was on the air waves of the Voice of the Revolution. For what reason ? We had signed our names for the approval of the film Midnight Cowboy. Unfortunately, the regime’s secrete police filed a report slamming the content of the R-rated movie. Subsequently, when I visited him with the late Zainoul A. Sanoussi, President Sékou Touré somewhat downplayed privately his public communiqué blaming us by name on the radio. It was a meager consolation for us, and particularly for our families and friends. They had been alarmed by the fact that Sékou Touré and the Bureau politique national of the PDG decided to disavow our official action so openly. They did not even watch themselves the incriminated movie, in the first place ! Although a screening session was held after the facts, in presence of Mamadi Keita, member of the Politbureau, and Senainon Behanzin, memer of the Central committee. The two officials acknowledged that despite its implicit sexual content, the film had artistic and substantive quality.… After all, it won the Motion Picture Academy Best Picture award for 1969.
Another record worth mentioning, from 1975 to 1977, I was, first co-host then sole host, of a radio show called “Voyage à travers la Guinée”. Still teaching at the University, I decide to explore radio-broadcasting. My mentor was veteran journalist Odilon Théa. We featured a different region  each week, presenting its history, culture, economy, touristic potential, etc. And we had fun preparing and airing the weekly (every Tuesday) program. For nearby Dubréka, I recall that we rented a cab and visited the town to collect information from residents. Later on, Marcelin Bangoura joined us. And, feeling confident in my performance, Odilon graciously bowed out and let me do the show alone. There too, an incident reminded of the peril involved in living and working under Sékou Touré. Having scheduled the town of Boffa (northwestern coast) I produced the show by going to the archives. There I dug out files about Nyara Gbèli, a mulatto female slave-trader. I aired selections of her biography and historical record. It turned out that Sékou Touré and all members of the Politbureau were tuned in. At the end the show, some were not please to hear about the slavery piece of the show. They suggested that I be summoned for explanations. Luckily, Sékou Touré agreed with those who opposed the idea, arguing that it would not be a boost to my confidence in exploring the country’s past. How did I know what happened in the higher echelon of the government? Well, Léon Maka, National Assembly president attended the meeting. His daughter, Madeleine, was a colleague and a good friend of mine at Voix de la Révolution. He told her about the discussion they had had. And she, in turn, shared with me, saying: “Tierno, careful! Last you were nearly dragged before Sékou Touré and the Bureau politique!”

Tierno S. Bah


Dianne White Oyler
A cultural revolution in Africa:
literacy in the Republic of Guinea since independence

The International Journal of African History. Vol. 34, No. 3 (2001), pp. 585-600

Contents

Introduction
Guinea and Decolonization
The N’ko Alphabet
Guinea’s Cultural Revolution
The Role of Literacy in Cultural Revolution
Souleymane Kante’s Indigenous Approach to Literacy
The Contest: Sékou Touré vs. Souleymane Kanté
Conclusion

Introduction

At independence most African nations attempted a process of decolonization in the three spheres of European imperialism: political, economic, and cultural. While progress in the political and economic arenas is apparent decolonization of the cultural area is much harder to define because European cultural impositions had usurped the areas of language, socialization through education, and technology from simple writing to electronic media. However, the approach of the Republic of Guinea to cultural decolonization can be analyzed in light of the more formal “Cultural Revolution” launched by its independence leader Sékou Touré in 1958 as a policy of the First Republic.

Erratum. — That program’s official name and acronym were “La révolution culturelle socialiste” and RCS, respectively. And it was not launched in 1958. To the contrary, it was declared ten years later at the improvised Conseil national de la révolution held in Kankan in 1968. — T.S. Bah

Touré’s objective was to validate the indigenous cultures that had been denigrated by the Europeans while at the same time creating a Guinean national consciousness 1. In other words, Touré launched a countrywide campaign to recapture indigenous culture by formally focusing on language and education. His specific intent was to validate indigenous culture by using maternal language education to achieve better control of European science and technology. This action, he believed, would lead Guinea into creating global economic partnerships within the modem world’s economy.

An unanticipated consequence of Touré’s campaign, however, was the cultural awakening of the Maninka speakers who consider themselves to be the direct descendants of the ancient empire of Mali. Although dispersed through the countries of West Africa (including Guinea, Mali, Mauritania, Senegal, Côte d’Ivoire, Niger, Burkina Faso, Benin, Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Nigeria), the Maninka speakers constitute roughly 40 percent of Guinea’s population. Many of them live in the region of Haute-Guinée, which makes up about two-fifths of Guinea’s territory.

Errata. — (1) Ms. Oyler shows here the first sign of her sole reliance on verbal informants at the exclusion of available written sources. Thus it is plain wrong for her and her informers to state that Sékou Touré did not anticipate a “Maninka cultural awakening.” Actually, he was an hands-on president who exhausted himself micro-managing every aspect of social and, indeed, family and personal life. Accordingly, it’s just valid to speak of a social movement like the N’ko, that he would not have predicted, and more or less tolerated.
(2) In percentage the Maninka demography comes second to the Fulɓe (Peul, Fula, Fulani) in Guinea. The former stands at approximately 35% of the population while the Fulɓe actually hold 40%. Given their respective size, the two groups weigh heavily in the political sphere. — T.S. Bah

The Maninka cultural revolution that began within Touré’s larger “Cultural Revolultion” continues today in the Second Republic of Lansana Conté, which began in 1984. The cultural revival of the Maninka language, its oral literature, and its connection to the heroic/historic past has been juxtaposed to any official policy of creating a Guinean national consciousness since 1958.

Note. —Guinea’s quest for “national consciousness” in the wake of the independence declaration stemmed from the heritage of all 16 ethnic communities, not that of the Maninka alone, especially in the first decade of the republic. Take for instance, the various musical traditions — either from sizable groups, like the Kisi of Forest Guinea with the Kebendo danse and song (see my review of Sia Tolno’s My Life album, or fom minorities, such the Koniagui (Unyëy) of Koundara with the rhythm Sampacthe. Everyone  contributed and enjoyed the celebration of the birth of the new nation. Alas, the euphoria lasted no more than two years!
— T.S. Bah

This article specifically addresses Guinea’s internal revolt against European cultural imperialism as evidenced in the issues of language and literacy that have dominated the political landscape in post-1958 Guinea 2.

Note. — This passage reads like a militant statement. But it lacks a specific to lend it credence. Where, when, how, and who staged the so-called revolt? How was it actually expressed? — T.S. Bah

It further addresses the concept of maternal language learning that became central to decolonization, and particularly the policy Sékou Touré developed and implemented with the support of UNESCO—the National Language Program (1968-1984) 3.

Erratum. — Beginning in the late 1960 UNESCO assisted the cultural policy of the Sékou Touré regime. However, the first illiteracy campaign was supported by the government of Mohammad Reza Pahlavi, Shah of Iran, in 1964-66. — T.S. Bah

More importantly, however, the article documents one result of Touré’s program that has acquired a life of its own outside government control, a grassroots literacy movement that centers on an alphabet called N’ko. The dissemination of N’ko shows the growth of a literacy movement that is currently spreading across international boundaries throughout West Africa. A salient aspect of the issue of language and literacy was the involvement of Souleymane Kanté (1922-1987), a Maninka-speaking “vernacular intellectual” who invented the N’ko alphabet in 1949. Souleymane Kanté was born in Soumankoyin-Kölönin about thirteen kilometers from Kankan. He was the son of the famous Quranic school teacher Amara Kanté. When Souleymane had finished his Quranic school education, he could read and write Arabic and translate Islamic texts. After his father’s death in 1941, Kanté left Guinea for Côte d’ Ivoire to make his fortune as an entrepreneur in a more cosmopolitan urban setting. Becoming an autodidact there, he read extensively, learned other languages, and became renowned as a scholar.

Guinea and Decolonization

Under Sékou Touré’s leadership, the Republic of Guinea ended political imperialism in 1958 when 95 percent of the voters cast a “No” vote in a referendum addressing the country’s wish to join the “French Community.” Thus began a real struggle for autonomy in the political, economic, and cultural spheres of national life.
At that time the reality of political independence meant indigenous leadership; in Guinea’s case, it also meant an inexperienced leadership. Sékou Touré’s experience offers a salient example of the under-preparation of emerging African leaders.

Note. — There is no such thing leadership preparation for independence. Colonialism meant hegemony, domination, exploitation, racisme, alienation. The colonizer did not —and would never— intend to genuinely associate the colonized in power-sharing. Read Albert Memmi’s Portrait du Colonisateur. — T.S. Bah

Possessing an eighth grade, French-style colonial education, plus a bit of training supplied by French communist trade unionists, and the experience of ten years in governmental service, Touré deliberately created an eclectic form of government that drew upon the strengths of his equally eclectic education. In the Cold War period Touré chose the political path of African Socialism and the diplomatic path of nonalignment. The type of government he called “positive neutralism” allowed him to open Guinea to all manner of foreign investment without committing himself to any specific ideology 4.
Inherent in the political independence of Guinea, however, was the problem of a revenue shortfall; France had withdrawn both its economic aid to Guinea and also its trade partnership. At the same time, Guinea lost its trade connections with many of France’s trading partners, especially among France’s NATO allies.
Guinea’s sister colonies within French West Africa (AOF) continued to trade with her unofficially, however.
As a Third World country producing raw materials to supply the First World industrial complex, Guinea produced many of the same products as other Third World nations that were constantly being encouraged to increase production. One result was a decrease in Guinea’s share of the world market, forcing the new nation to find alternative markets. With its doors closed to Western capitalist markets, Guinea became a trading partner with the Eastern bloc nations. Trade with Second World nations, however, exacerbated Guinea’s economic shortfall, as these nations were unable to purchase Guinea’s raw materials with foreign exchange, substituting instead manufactured goods. They then sold Guinea’s raw materials on the world market, thus gaining foreign exchange that improved their own economies to the detriment of Guinea’s. Although Guinea received Second World technology, she never did receive the support system that would have allowed her to maintain and expand upon that technology.

Today Guinea is one of the poorest nations in West Africa.

In the cultural sphere of Guinea’s national life, Sékou Touré opted to keep the French language; all documents would be written in French in the Roman alphabet, Guinea’s official language. It seems that Touré chose the colonial language with an eye to national unity in order to avoid the conflicts that would arise over choosing one of the twenty ethnic languages as the country’s official language.
French also served Guinea in the international marketplace where buyers and sellers were not likely to learn an African language. Guinea also continued to use the French system of education. However, university training for Guineans was now sought in First and Second World countries. Students received scholarships in the United States as well as a “free” education in the Soviet Union.

Although Touré had earlier implied that Guinea would be an Islamic state after independence, he imposed religious toleration instead in a country of Muslims, Christians, and African traditional religions; this eclecticism became one method of promoting national unity.

Note. — Since the above assertion provides no reference to  written sources, or to verifiable quotes, it appears pretty much groundless.
— T.S. Bah

Nevertheless, in the years following Guinea’s political independence, a large segment of Guinea’s Maninka-speaking population has tried to return the cultural initiative to African hands by utilizing an indigenous alphabet created by an indigenous scholar and cultural leader named Souleymane Kanté. While Sékou Touré, a Maninka-speaker himself, had encouraged Kanté in this initiative, he preferred not to allow the use of the writing system known as N’ko as a national language/writing system. Ultimately, though, Kanté’s research and promotion of learning in the maternal languages may have directly influenced Touré, who had addressed the issues of indigenous languages/writing systems as a way to reclaim African culture by implementing a National Language Program (1968-1984).

Notes. — (1) The above paragraph is too general and vague. How does the expression “large segment” translate numerically, statistically?
(2) It is hypothetical to write Souleymane Kanté “may have directly influenced” Sékou Touré’s language policy. Adverse, one can argue, the former did not inspire the latter. In the absence of any evidence from the author, I am enclined to think that Guinea’s adventurous linguistic initiatives had little to do with the efforts of Souleymane Kanté.
T.S. Bah

The N’ko Alphabet

According to informants, Souleymane Kanté created the N’ko alphabet both in response a media-based challenge 6 that Africans have no culture because they have no indigenous system of writing, and because of his growing realization that foreign writing systems could not fully express the meaning of such tonal languages as Maninka, his maternal language. Kanté responded to the allegation that “Africans have no culture” by creating an alphabet that would transcribe the twenty languages of the Mande language group as well as other tonal languages.
Thus, in his role as a “vernacular intellectual,” 7 Kanté campaigned against ignorance and illiteracy by providing a writing system that would allow his countrymen to acquire knowledge without having to depend upon outside interpretation. According to informants, he expressed the idea that Africans needed to learn their own maternal languages first, because learning in a second or third language often obfuscated the cultural meaning of the text 8. The potential for indigenous literacy would enable illiterates to read and write, even though they had been excluded from the colonial education system. Kanté devoted four years (1945-1949) to research and application, trying to write the Maninka language first in Arabic script and then in the Roman alphabet. In both cases he found that foreign alphabets could not transcribe all the tones produced by the spoken Mande languages. While still living in Cote d’Ivoire, he thus embarked on an entirely new project—the creation of a writing system that would reflect the specific characteristics of Mande languages, especially their tonality. The result was the N’ko alphabet. Having developed the alphabet, he called together children and illiterates and asked them to draw a line in the dirt; he noticed that seven out of ten drew the line from right to left 9. For that reason, he chose a right-to-left orientation. In all Mande languages the pronoun n- means “I” and the verb ko represents the verb “to say.” By choosing the name N’ko, “I say” in all Mande languages, Kanté had united speakers of Mande languages with just one phrase.

Furthermore, all Mande speakers share the heroic past recounted in the tale of Sundiata, an epic of Mande history—reflecting the cultural dominance of men of valor who say “N’ko,” the clear language of Mali (Niane, 1989:87) 10.
After Souleymane Kanté had perfected his alphabet, informants recall his becoming absorbed in creating reading materials in the N’ko script. Kanté’s lifelong passion then became the production of N’ko texts to highlight knowledge that should be written in the maternal language. Kanté worked assiduously after returningt o his native Guineai n 1958. He translated and transcribed Islamic texts and also works of history, sociology, linguistics, literature, philosophy, science, and technology. Then he wrote textbooks for teaching the N’ko alphabet, and, like Samuel Johnson and Noah Webster before him, he created a dictionary for the written form of the Maninka language. There are no dates for the translations of any of the above mentioned texts. Other than the fact that religious works were translated and transcribed first, informants are not aware of the order in which other texts were renderedi n N’ko. After hand-writing these texts, an arduous task in itself, Kanté would then create copies to give as gifts to teachers, thus encouraging N’ko literacy within the Mande community. Teachers then made these texts available to students, who in turn reproduced additional books by copying them.
Consequently, Kanté directly touched the lives of many of those who became literate in N’ko, and he was the prime mover of a type of cultural nationalism that gave people the pride of sharing a language that could stand in words and script alongside any other.

Guinea’s Cultural Revolution

When Sékou Touré called upon all Guineans to return home to help build the new nation after Guinea achieved independence in 1958, Kanté returned from Côte d’Ivoire to a new social order 11.

From the 1940’s through the 1960’s, Guinea was in the process of reinventing itself politically and culturally at the local, regional, and national levels 12.

In the midst of this cultural upheaval, nationalist leaders professed a desire to shed colonial trappings and to tap into their heroic/historic African past. Since the ethnic groups within Guinea’s national borders had never before been joined together, a nationalist rhetoric was developed that sent mixed messages about loyalty to the past. Harking back to the grandeur of an African heritage, however, also tempted each group to focus their allegiance internally rather than to a greater Guinean nationalism. At the national level, the Partie Democratique Guineen (PDG) agitated for a Guinean “national consciousness,” 13 while local ethnic groups continued the cultural re-identification process that had begun in the mid-1940s 14.

The Maninka speakers of Haute-Guinée, for example, had established the Union Manden in 1946 as a voluntary mutual aid association organized around a linguistic, ethnic, and regional base 15. That action kindled interest in the glorious Mande past.

This mutual aid association had been founded by such Maninka speaking political activists as Sékou Touré and Framoi Bérété. The association had also served as a regional political party with the ability to launch candidates in national elections, something the Maninka speakers had been unable to do in the 1945 elections.

Despite the desire of the Union Manden to give national expression to Mande discontent, it never developed beyond its regional, cultural base 16.

The conflict between Guinean nationalism and regional, ethnic/cultural nationalism continued to manifest itself throughout the First Republic, particularly in the implementation of the National Language Program (1968-1984).

The Role of Literacy in Cultural Revolution

Souleymane Kanté introduced Sékou Touré to the idea of maternal language literacy and education in 1958 17. Although Sékou Touré had praised the Mande styled alphabet, he rejected the idea of its becoming the national alphabet of Guinea 18 because he believed it could not improve written communication among Guinea’s ethnic groups, and he knew that it would also obstruct communication with the outside world 19.

Nevertheless, Touré rewarded Kanté’s scholarly achievement by honoring him with a 200,000 CFA gift from the Guinean peoplefor indigenous excellence 20. But he still refused to support or promote the alphabet unless Kanté could prove that more than half the population of Haute-Guinée used the technology 21. Touré further requested that Kanté and his family return to his home country 22.

Answering the call, Kanté went to the area of Treicheville in Abidjan, where he was met by a military truck sent overland by Touré to collect the Kanté family 23.

The Kanté family moved to Kankan where Souleymane Kanté then became a merchant who taught N’ko on the side 24. Interestingly, however, the alphabet preceded Kanté’s arrival in Kankan; many of the initial students of N’ko had been merchants who had carried the new alphabet with them along trade routes throughout Mande-speaking West Africa 25. Informant family members reminisced that Souleymane had visited them in Guinea, and that they had visited him in Côte d’Ivoire. He had taught them the alphabet, and they in turn had taught their neighbors.

Although Sékou Touré had rejected Kanté’s Mande-styled alphabet as the national alphabet, he did eventually accept the concept of maternal language education 26.

Touré is reported to have introduced Kanté to his national education minister, Barry Diawadou, and to his minister of national defense, Fodéba Keita 27.

Touré excluded Kanté from policy making sessions, however, as he worked together with his minister of ideology and information, Senainon Béhanzin, to produce the model for a maternal language program that would accommodate Guinea’s multilingual society 28. Touré’s final proposal was then submitted to the rank and file of the PDG membership at the cell level within villages and urban districts 29.

One informant from Haute-Guinée had participated as a member of the party cell at the village level voting on the proposal for teaching in the maternal language. A teacher who had also been involved in standardization the Maninka language in the Roman alphabet, this informant explained that in 1958 Guinea was struggling to regain its political, economic, and cultural independence. The country chose to free itself culturally through a National Language Program: Congress established a National Education Commission to formulate government policy, and teachers were called upon to contribute to the effort in two ways-to standardize their specific, spoken language in the Roman alphabet and to translate into the national languages modem scientific knowledge that had been written in French. Finally, the government intended to use its publishing house, Imprimerie Patrice Lumumba, to print textbooks for the project 30.

Informants who had participated in implementing these educational reforms reminisced about the rationale behind the new policy. Literacy acquisition in French had been discarded as too complicated a procedure, as students would have had to learn both a new alphabet and a new language. The process would be simplified if people first learned a new alphabet to which they could apply the familiarm aternall anguage 31. The government established two autonomous agencies to deal with the National Language Program, the Institut de Recherche Linguistique Appliquée (IRLA) and the Service National de l’Alphabétisation (SNA) 32.
Eight of the twenty different languages spoken in Guinea were selected on the basis of the numbers of people using them as a primary or secondary language:

Maninka, Susu, Pular, Kissi, Guerzé (Kpelle), Tome (Loma), Oneyan, and Wamey.

Each either was or would become a lingua franca in its region or sub-region. Although Mande languages were widely used in all four regions, the Maninka form was selected to be the dominant language to be taught only in Haute-Guinée. According to the National Language Program, an illiterate adult Mande-speaking family in Kankan would be taught the Maninka language written in the Roman alphabet; adults would be taught at work while children would be taught at school. Likewise, a Pular-speaking family living in Kankan would have the same experience; even though they were non-Mande speakers, the language of instruction would be Maninka 33.
Financial constraints delayed the immediate implementation of the National Language Program 34. The regional education directors for Haute-Guinée believed that the infrastructure did not exist for a massive assault on illiteracy; despite the government’s commitment to provide free public primary education, it had failed to anticipate the additional funds necessary to generate materials written in the newly formulated and standardized national languages 35. Teachers themselves had to finance the standardization of the national languages by giving their time to the endeavor. In 1965 Touré applied for and received UNESCO funding for a maternal language education program called “Langue Nationale,” which the government implemented in 1967 36. UNESCO sent experts to assist the Guinean government in standardizing local languages in the Roman alphabet 37. Although the preparation for the National Language Program had begun in 1959, the actual campaign for adults did not begin in 1967, and in 1968 the campaign entered the schools. Both programs were associated with Sdkou Touré’s larger social program, “La Révolution Culturelle Socialiste.” 38
The reforms implemented in 1968 consisted of two coexisting educational tracks—one for schools and one for adults and school leavers. From 1968 to 1984 students in the public elementary schools were taught all subjects in the maternal language 39. During the First Cycle, in grades one through three, the language of instruction was the maternal language 40. At grade four, they were introduced to an academic course in French, which they continued each year through grade six. Academic subjects were still taught in the maternal language. In the Second Cycle, affecting the lower secondary grades seven through nine, students continued the program with an academic course in French and with the maternal language as the language of instruction. To advance to the upper secondary level, students had to pass an exam, the Brevet Elémentaire du Second Cycle Technique. During the Third Cycle, students experienced a change in the language of instruction, and the language of instruction at the lycée gradually became French 41. To be admitted to the university level—the Fourth Cycle—students had to pass the exam for the Baccalauréat Unique.

In 1973 the Ministry of Education added a thirteenth grade that bridged the third and fourth cycles, and exams were administered at the end of the thirteenth level 42. The second track consisted of adults and school leavers who were given the opportunity to acquire literacy (alphabétisation) by attending literacy programs in the maternal language before or after work either at their places of employment or at schools after the normal school day 43.

In preparation for the 1968 implementation of the National Language Program, each ethnic group was charged with standardizing the spoken language into a written form in the Roman alphabet. Educators in Kankan, the capital of Mande-speaking Haute-Guinée, looked for people who possessed a rich vocabulary and who were generally well informed who could participate in translating the diverse curricula into the maternal language.

It was then that the committee invited Souleymane Kanté to participate in the standardization process 44. They considered him an expert because while inventing the N’ko alphabet he had spent years trying to find the best way to write the Mande languages in the Roman alphabet. Kanté agreed to participate unofficially in the project.

Souleymane Kanté’s Indigenous Approach to Literacy

Although Souleymane Kanté assisted the government with the standardization of his maternal language, Maninka, he did not abandon his own literacy program.
Kanté disapproved of Touré’s National Language Program because it depended upon a foreign alphabet and on foreign constructions. In fact, he held that if there were to be a cultural revolution that drew upon the African past, then African cultural forms should be its foundation. Kanté’s goal was to control Mande and modern knowledge through the use of a Mande language and literacy program. He thus offered an indigenous alternative to the official National Language Program. The two literacy initiatives, he believed, were not mutually exclusive.
Touré’s state-funded literacy campaign dominated the formal education scene, drawing upon the existing infrastructure, its curricula and its personnel. Kanté is remembered as having taught N’ko in the marketplace. He had taught the members of his own extended family and had recommended that others do the same 45. The “each one teach one” policy was actually a recommendation for each person to teach at least seven others. Informants recalled that Kanté attracted many followers by demonstrating N’ko at social functions, such as funerals,  where he opened his Qur’an written in N’ko and read the Word of God 46. Kanté suggested that everyone should learn N’ko and that those who refused would later regret their error. Kanté’s literacy movement slowly gained support as it operated on the fringes in an informal educational environment that paralleled Touré’s state system. Kanté’s movement possessed no infrastructure, enjoyed no financial assistance, had no texts except the ones students copied for themselves. The engine that powered the movement was a person’s desire to repossess Mande culture by controlling knowledge through Mande language and literacy.
Teachers were the key to this grassroots movement. Some teachers were drawn from the existing state-funded pool of personnel. Others were businessmen and workers who taught N’ko at their businesses or in their homes. Most in the N’ko teaching force contributed their time without remuneration. In some cases the students’ families gave gifts to their teachers at the end of the service in order to help support the teacher or the school. The process of learning N’ko took about four months. Each N’ko teacher could teach three groups per year. In the beginning,  students were mostly adults, who later saw to it that their children were also educated in N’ko. Armed with a blackboard, a tripod, and a piece of chalk, the N’ko teachers employed a methodology similar to that of Quranic school—memorization, imitation, and utilization. Students would congregate at the compound of a teacher where they would copy the alphabet on slate or paper and then would use oral recitation as a tool for memorization and reinforcement. The teacher conducted the class, but students, regardless of age, had the responsibility for leading the recitations. Students who were quick and adept were recruited as assistants and eventually became teachers themselves. Students copied the texts that Kanté had translated and transcribed to produce personal or family copies. Those who became N’ko literate were well equipped to read the literature Kanté had generated, were able to communicate with others literate in N’ko, and could keep records and accounts for their businesses. Some students undertook the task of recording the oral histories of older members of their families to preserve in writing first-hand knowledge 47.

The Contest: Sékou Touré vs. Souleymane Kanté

An informal competition over the recasting of Mande culture developed as Sékou Touré and Souleymane Kanté seemed to wrestle with each other for the number of Mande speakers in Haute-Guinée who acquired literacy in the maternal language.

Maternal language literacy was the goal, but the choice of alphabet seemed to become a personal issue. Touré appeared to have the advantage because his program was heir to the already existing state program. His selection of the Roman alphabet was prudent because the alphabet was already used throughout much of the world, and local typesetting existed and was in place. While a few maternal language textbooks were published, the translation and publication of other works in the maternal languages never materialized 48. Kanté worked at a disadvantage. From the standpoint of infrastructure and funding, he lacked resources, and N’ko required an innovation in typesetting that was not locally available. Yet he continued to produce handwritten translated texts in the N’ko alphabet. These translations systematically spread throughoutt he Mande-speaking community as students hand copied them so as to have their personal copies for reading and teaching.

The two Mande-speaking competitors had developed opposing teaching methodologies. Sékou Touré imposed the Roman alphabet upon children and adults through the state-supported literacy program. The concept of a National Language Program had been supported by the PDG rank and file. But some educators observed that the program had a negative effect on learning French as an international language of diplomacy and economics 49. Because the educational system was universal only at the elementary level, students who failed the exams at the end of the Second Cycle never had the opportunity to continue French language instruction. In addition, adults who were acquiring literacy through the program never had the opportunity to learn French because they were limited to the maternal language. The goal was national literacy, and children and adults were becoming literate in the maternal language, limiting them to regional participation. By using the educational process in this manner, the government had effectively restricted the numbers of participants in the national arena, and, by so doing, restricted access to full knowledge of the French language itself.
On the other hand, Souleymane Kanté had attracted students by focusing upon Mande culture. Adults and children learned the alphabet voluntarily because it was culturally important to them. Having learned the alphabet, students used it for correspondence and business, and they amassed handwritten translations of religious, historical, and modem scientific texts. The significance of N’ko literacy led to a personal understanding of a wide variety of knowledge. Learning N’ko became a form of self-improvement because it was not promoted as the acquisition of knowledge for advancement in the political or economic structure of the nation. Touré had clung to a limited vision—that of the European—conceived nation-state that while striving for a Guinean national consciousness could not leave the designated borders of the Guinean nation. Kanté’s arena had been regional; he created a Mande consciousness that eventually drew together Guinea’s resident Mande speakers of Haute-Guinée and Guinée Forestière, and, more importantly, ultimately connected all the Mande speakers in West Africa.
Although Touré’s motives cannot be wholly known 50, in formants have characterized his relationship to Kanté based on conversations with either or both men and through the events the informants themselves witnessed.

It appears that in the 1960s Touré had hoped to isolate Kanté from his work by coopting him into the National Language Program. Kanté would not abandon his own work, however, and continued teaching the N’ko alphabet and translating texts into N’ko. Informants relate that Kanté wrote out texts by hand and used a Renault duplication machine capable of producing books of ten to twenty pages. In 1971 when the machine broke down, he journeyed to Conakry to ask the government for financial assistance in establishing a larger-scale print shop capable of duplicating works such as the N’ko version of the Qur’an 51.

In Conakry, Al-Hajj Kabiné Diané helped Kanté as much as he could by printing small runs at this Arabic printing press 52. Touré did nominate Kanté to the Conseil Islamique National (charged with defending Islam and its principles in Guinea) 53, but Kanté declined the appointment, saying that the committee meetings would interfere with the time he needed to translate texts into N’ko 54. Making his home in Conakry in the early 1970s, Kanté continued to write documents by hand; then he took them to Al-Hajj Kabiné Diané for printing 55. Kanté sold the printed manuscripts for a small sum in order to promote further literacy in N’ko in all segments of the community 56.

His family and friends reported that the relationship between the two men continued to deteriorate until Sékou Touré’s death in 1984. Thus, from the late 1970s through mid-1980’s, Kanté was forced to leave Guinea on several occasions and to reside in neighboring countries under the threat of being arrested or killed by Touré’s government 57.

During this self-imposed exile, Souleymane Kanté continued to translate works into N’ko and to compile a text of Mande healing arts 58.

Sékou Touré’s National Language Program from 1968 to 1984 had produced people who were literate in their spoken maternal language.

Under the leadership of Lansana Conté, the Second Republic implemented a new language program: French became the single national language and the language of literacy.
Although maternal language radio programs occurred during the Touré regime, the new government has systematically supported learning in the maternal languages by producing radio and television programs of cultural and news content spoken in only three of Guinea’s maternal languages—Susu, Maninka, and Pular.

After his return home to Guinea in 1985, Souleymane Kanté lived in Conakry teaching his alphabet until his death from diabetes in 1987 59.

Statistics on the number of adults and children who know how to read and write N’ko have not been established.

Under Kanté’s direction, his disciples established the Association pour l’Impulsion et la Coordination des Recherches sur l’Alphabet N’ko (ICRA-N’KO) in 1986. ICRA-N’KO was officially sanctioned by the government in 1991 as a non-governmental organization (NGO) 60. Only since then has the group actively begun to compile statistics based on the current number of students enrolled in N’ko classes. Each teacher turns in a list of students to the local ICRAN’KO association, which records the numbers and sends them on to the Service National d’Alphabétisation to be included in the year’s literacy statistics.

By looking at the numerical fragments, it can be seen that the number of students in N’ko classes had steadily increased from 1989 to 1994; however, it is not possible to say whether or not this was the result of an increase in the number of students or the result of better record-keeping.

A literacy survey of Kankan I conducted in 1994 presents the first literacy statistics for the city 61. Canvassers interviewed each household about the languages spoken and about the alphabets used to transcribe those languages. One would expect a competitive percentage of those who were able to read and write the Maninka language in the Roman alphabet after sixteen years of Touré’s National Language Program.

The results of the survey are enlightening because they show that only 3.1 percent of the 128,000—plus indigenous inhabitants (men, women, and children above the age of five) knew how to read and write in French, while 8.8 percent knew how to read and write N’ko 62.

Other figures show that among the people of Kankan, 8.5 percent could read Arabic and 14.1 percent could read and write French. The “langue nationale” appears to have been discarded, while the N’ko alphabet appears to be blossoming.

Kanté’s N’ko seems to have become more widely accepted in Kankan. Thus the ultimate advantage seems to lie with Kanté’s approach rather than Touré’s.

Conclusion

Since independence the Maninka speakers of Guinea have struggled against what they perceived to be Western cultural imperialism in the area of language and literacy. As a conflict within the nation-state, it reflects the ongoing struggle for autonomy. Being literate in N’ko has become an important part of the current Mande cultural revival because the possession of N’ko signifies the reclaiming of the area’s cultural integrity.

The N’ko alphabet has offered Maninka speakers a renewed capacity to make culturally significant choices, and they seem to have chosen N’ko as an indigenous alternative to the education of language/literacy promoted by the Western-influenced Mande speakers who have controlled government and religion since Touré’s time.

Persons seeking to learn N’ko have steadily created enthusiasm and support for learning the alphabet, which has spread from Mande-speaking Kankan both to other Mande speakers throughout Guinea and also to Mande speakers residing in neighboring states.

* This article is based on the research in Kankan, Republic of Guinea in 1991, 1992-1993, and 1994, with the assistance of a Fulbright Dissertation Research Scholarship for 1992-1993 and a West African Research Association Fellowship for the summer of 1994.

Notes
1. In the same year in the British colony of Nigeria, Chinua Achebe also validated indigenous culture by writing his classic novel, Things Fall Apart (1958).
2. It is difficult to divorce the broader issues of Guinea’s “Cultural Revolution” from ethnic ones, however, particularly the view that during the Touré and Conté periods (1958-1984 and 1984 to the present, respectively), Maninka speakers may have been progressively disfranchised from the nation’s political process. Touré did not empower all Maninka speakers but gave preference to the ones from his own area of Faranah. Conté is a Susu speaker who has systematically alienated the Maninka speakers since taking power in 1984. However, his support of the Maninka based grassroots literacy movement might be an attempt to change this.
3. Sékou Touré’s archival documents, including personal papers and correspondence, were either destroyed or hidden after his death. Consequently, there are no currently existing archives of the First Republic and the papers that are hidden are inaccessible. With regard to the personal relationship between Sékou Touré and Souleymane Kanté, interviews provide some insights.
4. André Lewin, La Guinée: [Que Sais-je?] (Paris, 1984), 67.
5. By 1990 there were approximately 16 million speakers of the 20 languages classified as Mande, radiating out from the Mande heartland across the borders of ten West African countries. The Maninka speakers of Guinea reside in the region of Upper Guinea adjacent to the Mande heartland, which lies just across Guinea’s border with Mali.
6. Informants explained that Kanté accepted a 1944 challenge posed by the Lebanese journalist Kamal Marwa in an Arabic-language publication, Nahnu fi Afrikiya [We Are in Africa]. Marwa argued that Africans were inferior because they possessed no indigenous written form of communication. His statement that “African voices [languages] are like those of the birds, impossible to transcribe” reflected the prevailing views of many colonial Europeans. Although the journalist acknowledged that the Vai had created a syllabary, he discounted its cultural relevancy because he deemed it incomplete. Personal Interviews 08 in Karifamoriah, 46 in Kankan, and 70 in Conakry, 1993. To protect the identity of the informant or informants, interview citations include only the interview number, date, and location. The informants are equally divided between N’ko practitioners and those outside the N’ko community, some of whom have never heard of the alphabet. All interviews took place with the author and research assistant in in Guinea unless otherwise indicated. Interviews were conducted randomly as informants were available, or as travel arrangements could be made I have in my possession the audiotapes in Maninka and the written translations in French.
7. See Steven Feierman’s stimulating use of the term in Peasant Intellectuals: Anthropology and History in Tanzania (Madison, 1990).
8. Group Interview 18, 5 April 1993, Balandou, Guinea. Kanté emphasizes the integration of local knowledge with foreign knowledge by preserving both in the maternal language in a script that he himself creates. For that reason, one should characterize him as a vernacular intellectual.
9. Interviews 62 (14 July 1993) and 70 (18 July 1993), in Conakry, and Interview 09, 11 March 1993, Kankan. Souleymane Kanté’s experiments, reinforced by his acquisition of Arabic literacy as an Islamic scholar, were responsible for the selection of this right to left orientation. It might also have been a political statement rejecting African deculturation by Europeans.
10. Interview 70, 8 July 1993, Conakry. It is evident that this informant associates Kanté with his own ethnic pride in the heroic/historic Mande past as descendants of the ancient kingdom of Mali.
11. Odile Goerg, “La Guinée,” in Catherine Coquery-Vidrovitch with Odile Goerg, L’Afrique Occidentale au temps des Français Colonisateurs et Colonisé (c. 1860-1960) (Paris, 1992), 365.
12. R.W. Johnson, “Guinea,” in John Dunn, ed., West Africa States, Failure and Promise A Study in Comparative Politics (Cambridge, 1978), 38.
13. Defined by Victor Du Bois as “a feeling among the citizens of the young republic that their destiny is somehow linked to that of other peoples with whom in the past they have never shared a sense of kinship or identity.” Du Bois, “Guinea,” in James S. Coleman and Carl. Rosberg, Jr.,e ds., Political Parties and National Integration in Tropical Africa (Berkeley, 1964), 199.
14. Ibid., 186.
15. Ruth Schachter Morgenthau, Political Parties in French-speaking West Africa (Oxford, 1964), 224.
16. Jean Suret-Canale, La République de Guinée (Paris, 1970), 144.
17. In Interview 60, 9 July 1993, in Conakry, the informant said that as a Mande speaker himself, Sékou Touré sincerely admired Kanté’s invention but that he was a political man wanting to promote national unity. In Interview 80, 20 July 1994, in Conakry, a personal friend of Touré said that the latter wanted to support N’ko but that the other members of the Political Bureau, and his cabinet, did not.
18. Choosing Mande as the national language or even institutionalizing the Mande-styled alphabet for orthography would have caused dissension between Mande speakers and the other ethnic groups in Guinea. Furthermore, while Mande speakers could write the Mande language in N’ko, Susu speakers could write the Susu language in N’ko, and Pular speakers could write the Pular language in N’ko, they would not be able to read each other’s texts; although the script was the same, the languages would not be mutually intelligible. The former regional director of education in Kankan commented that the rejection of Kanté’s alphabet was divisive among the leaders of Touré’s government. Interview 64, 64, 15 July 1993, in Conakry.
19. Interview 09, 11 March 1993, in Kankan; Interview 60, 9 July 1993, in Conakry; Interview 68, 7 July 1993, in Conakry; Interview 80, 20 July 1994, in Conakry; Interview 59, 28 June 1993, in Kankan; and Group Interview 84, 15 August 1994, in Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire.
20. In Group Interview 43, 18 May 1993, in Kankan, one informant stated that Sékou Touré had promised Souleymane Kanté that he would build a school for N’ko.
21. Interview 51, 22 June 1993, in Djankana; Interview 59, 28, June 1993, in Kankan.
22. There is some confusion about the manner in which this occurred. Some informants have said that Sékou Touré sought out Souleymane Kantd in Abidjan after hearing about the alphabet through the grapevine. Interview 51, 22 June 1993, in Djankana. Others insisted that Souleymane Kanté went on his own to Conakry to present the alphabet to Touré. Interview 59, 28 June 1993, in Kankan. One informant claimed to have taught Sékou Touré N’ko, after which Touré told the informant to invite Kanté to visit him in Conakry. Interview 80, 20 July 1994, in Conakry. Regardless of who initiated the interview, informants concur on the rest of the story. In Interview 81, 9 August 1994, in Conakry, the informant reasserted the claim that the informant in Interview 80 had in fact taught N’ko to Sékou Touré, but that Sékou abandoned his studies when the political arena heated up. In Group Interview 84, 15 August 1994, in Abidjan, we visited the house where the Kanté family shared a room and spoke with neighbors who witnessed the military truck moving the family back to Guinea.
23. Interview 51, 22 June 1993, in Djankana.
24. According to the informants in Group Interview 08, 8 March 1993, in Karifamoriah, at the time only Maninka-speaking long-distance traders were merchants in Abidjan. When the exploitation of the Sefadou diamond mines in Sierra Leone began, many of these merchants carried the ability to write and teach N’ko with them into the new marketplace.
25. Prior to independence, many Guineans were dispersed throughout West Africa. Some were employed by the French as bureaucrats, teachers, or as railroad transportation workers. Others, such as a large number of Maninka speakers, were dispersed along West African trade routes. For example one informant’s father had been the railroad station-master at Bobo Dioulasso, Burkina Faso, in 1944. Interview 07, 6 March 1993, Kankan; Niane, Sundiata, 93.
26. Sékou Touré, “Débat culturel: Le Chef de l’Etat sur les langues africaines,” Horoya 2889, 25-31 Octobre 1981, 13-16.
27. Interview 68, 17 July 1993, in Conakry.
28. Interview 64, 15 July 1993, in Conakry.
29. Johnson, “Guinea,” 55. In Touré’s attempt to reconnect to the African past, he organized the party structure to imitate the organization of village councils. The system appeared to consult the common man on every major government decision. Ideally, the idea originated at the cell level and gained acceptance as it moved to the high-ranking leaders of the Bureau Politique National (BPN). In this case the idea originated at the top and was presented for approval to the Comités d’Unité de l’Education. Du Bois describes the organization of the PDG in his political commentary, “Guinea,” 200-205. UNESCO, The Experimental World Literacy Programme: A Critical Assessment (Paris, 1976), 26-30.
30. Interview 34, 10 May 1993, in Kankan, and Interview 55, 24 June 1993, in Kankan.
31. Interview 64, 15 July 1993, in Conakry; Interview 60, 9 July 1993, in Conakry; and Interview 55, 24, June 1993, in Kankan.
32. Interview 66, 16 July 1993, in Conakry. The informant was a Directeur Régional de l’Education in Kankan.
33. Mohamed Lamine Sano, “Aperçu Historique sur l’Utilisation des Langues Nationales en République de Guinée,” unpublished paper (1992), 3-4.
34. Interview 64, 15 July 1993, in Conakry.
35. UNESCO, World Literacy Programme, 42.
36. Interview 64, 15, July 1993, in Conakry.
37. UNESCO considered its program separate from the government’s national campaign. Interestingly enough, the UNESCO funds were not used for a pilot project in Haute-Guinée. The program targeted 3,500 illiterate and newly literate industrial workers in Conakry and 75,000 illiterate farmers living in lower Guinea (the Susu language), middle Guinea (the Pular language), and the forest region (the Kissi, Guerzé, and Toma languages). UNESCO, World Literacy Programme, 42-43.
38. Interview 64, 15 July 1993, in Conakry; Group Interview 46, 19 June 1993, in Kankan; and Interview 55, 24 June 1993, in Kankan. See Ministère du Domaine de l’Education et de la Culture, La Reforme de l’Enseignement en Republique de Guinée Novembre 1958-Mai 1977 (Conakry, 1977), 6-8.
39. Kamori Traoré, “Guinée,” in Alfâ Ibrâhîm Sow, ed., Langues et Politiques de Langues en Afrique Noire: l’Experience de l’UNESCO (Paris, 1976), 265.
40. Interview 60, 9 July 1993, in Conakry.
41. Ministry of Education and Culture, Cultural Policy in the Revolutionary People’s Republic of Guinea (Paris, 1979), 36.
42. Ibid., 9-10.
43. Interviews 34 and 55, 10 May 1993 and 24 June 1993, respectively in Kankan were with one informant.
44. Interviews 34 (10 May 1993) and 55 (24 June 1993), in Kankan.
45. Souleymane Kante’s recommendations were that each person should teach seven other people. Group Interview, 08, 8 March 1993, in Karifamoriah. In Interview 05, 3 March 1993, in Kankan, the informant said that the instructions were to teach the family, so he taught all of his children.
46. Interview 60, 9 July 1993, in Conakry.
47. Those who were literate in N’ko were spoken of as preserving for posterity the oral histories of elders. Interview 05, 3 March 1993, in Kankan.
48. Secretariat d’Etat à l’Idéologie-Service National d’Alphabétisation, Sori ni Mariama (Teheran, n.d.) and Académie des Langues Conakry, Maninkakan Sariya, Grammaire Maninka 2e et 3e cycle (Conakry, 1980) are examples of texts produced for the literacy program.
49. Interview 66, 16 July 1993, in Conakry.
50. According to this informant, the government could not fight the N’ko alphabet directly. It was necessary to formulate a political strategy to eliminate N’ko, either to isolate the creator so that he would abandon it or to exile him so that the population would forget about it. Interview 59, 28 June 1993, in Kankan. In Interview 68, 17 July 1993, in Conakry, the informant stated that the government used Kanté in the National Language Program because he was the only one who could translate all of the necessary terminologies.
51. A local merchant, Sékou Diané, is remembered as having given Souleymane Kanté money to buy this machine in Abidjan. Interview 29, 3 May 1993, and Interview 49, 20 June 1993, in Kankan; Interview 68, 17 July 1993, in Conakry.
52. Interview 82, 10 August 1994, in Conakry. El Hadj Kabiné Diané was a prominent businessman from Kankan who also owned a business in Conakry and was a part of the National Islamic Council.
53. In Interview 09, 11 March1 993, in Kankan, the informant established the date as 1973.
54. Interview 62, 14 July1 993, in Conakry.
55. Ibid.; and Interview 32, 8 May 1993, in Kankan.
56. Interview 32, 8 May 1993, in Kankan.
57. Interview 80, 20 July 1994, in Conakry, the informants described Touré as being troubled by leadership problems he was experiencing with Guinea’s intellectuals. In Interview 59, 28 June 1993, in Kankan, the informant told a story he heard from Souleymane Kanté: The government had supplied Kanté with transportation to Romania for treatment of his diabetes in 1974. Assisting the Guinean government, th e Romanian government institutionalized Kanté in a psychiatric facility, where an attempt was made on his life by lethal injection. Kanté refused the treatment and escaped death. Kanté convinced the doctors to release him, since, in the end, his condition itself was a death sentence. Later in Conakry he met the person who had been the Guinean ambassador to Romania at the time of his incarceration, wh o thought that Kanté was deceased. Interview 31, 8 May 1993, in Kankan, Interview 62, 14 July 1993, in Conakry and Group Interview 46, 19 June 1993, in Kankan.
58. Interview 31, 8 May 1993, in Kankan, Interview 51, 22 June 1993, in Djankana; Interview 62, 14 July 1993, in Conakry; Interview 59, 28 June 1993, in Kankan; Group Interview 30, 4 May 1993, in Bamako. Group Interview 84, 15 August 1994, in Abidjan, the informants recalled that Kanté told them that he had returned to Côte d’Ivoire in political exile and said that Touré was jealous of his invention. Theye estimated that he spent eight years with them in Côte d’Ivoire, two years in Bouake and six in Abidjan, interspersed with trips to Bamako.
59. Interview 62, 14, July 1993, in Conakry.
60. Interview 68, 17 July 1993, in Conakry, and Interview 69, July 18, 1993, in Conakry.
61. Literacy Survey of Kankan, 4 August 1994. There are no complete literacy statistics at any level. The numbers represented in the survey offer a beginning point at which literacy statistics can be assessed and can be later measured in percentages. I conducted another Literacy Survey of Kankan in July 2000. When I have finished entering the data, I will be able to determine growth in the numbers who are literate in N’ko over the last six years.
62. The literacy survey showed that 14.1 percent of the population knew how to read and write French, 8.5 percent of the population knew how to read and write Arabic, 8.8 percent of the population knew how to read and write [the Maninka language] in N’ko, and 3.1 percent of the population knew how to read and write [Maninka] in the Roman alphabet [Langue Nationale].

Dr. I. Sow, psychiatre Pullo, analyse Kumen

Arɗo (pasteur, guide, astrologue, vétérinaire, chef) tenant son bâton de commandement et entouré de sa famille. Ces éleveurs tressaient les cheveux d'hommes et de femmes. Ils ont emporté dans l'au-delà les connaissances et le mode de vie du Pulaaku. Ni paeïns, ni fétichistes, ils étaient, au contraire, monothéistes. Ils croyaient en Geno, l'Etre Suprême. Ici, une calebasse de trayeuse est posée aux pieds d'une matriarche. Un lien spiituel fécond unit cette dernière à Foroforondu, la gardienne tutélaire du laitage, et épouse de Kumen, l''archange des troupeaux. Photo <a href="http://www.webguinee.net/bbliotheque/histoire/arcin/1911/tdm.html">Arcin</a>, Fuuta-Jalon, 1911. — T.S. Bah.
Arɗo (pasteur, guide, astrologue, vétérinaire, chef) tenant son bâton pastoral de commandement et entouré de sa famille. Ces éleveurs tressaient les cheveux d’hommes et de femmes. Ils ont emporté dans l’au-delà les connaissances et le mode de vie du Pulaaku. Ni paeïns, ni fétichistes, ils étaient, au contraire, monothéistes. Ils croyaient en Geno, l’Etre Suprême. Ici, une calebasse de trayeuse est posée aux pieds d’une matriarche. Un lien spiituel fécond unit cette dernière à Foroforondu, la gardienne tutélaire du laitage, et épouse de Kumen, l”archange des troupeaux. Photo Arcin, Fuuta-Jalon, 1911. — T.S. Bah.

Dr. Ibrahima Sow épelle Koumen (en réalité Kumen) dans un article détaillé doublé d’une exégèse élaborée et originale, qu’il intitule “Le Monde Peul à travers le Mythe du Berger Céleste”. Le document parut dans Ethiopiques. Revue Négro-Africaine de Littérature et de Philosophie. Numéro 19, juillet 1979. La contribution de Dr. Sow est basée sur Koumen, Texte initiatique des Pasteurs Peuls, le chef-d’oeuvre d’Amadou Hampâté Bâ, rédigé en français en collaboration avec l’éminente ethnologue française, Germaine Dieterlen. Gardée secrète par ses détenteurs Fulɓe, la version originale Pular/Fulfulde a peut-être disparue à jamais avec la mort de Hampâté.

Il ne faut pas confondre ce spécialiste avec Prof. Alfâ Ibrâhîm Sow.

Pour un glossaire sur le Pulaaku cosmogonique et culturel on peut se référer à ma liste en appendice à Koumen.

Dr. Sow est l’auteur de deux autres textes dans la même revue:

  • “Le Listixaar est-il une pratique divinatoire ?”
  • “La littérature, la philosophie, l’art et le local”

Ma réédition complète de l’analyse de Kumen par Dr. Sow est accessible sur Semantic Africa. J’ai (a) composé la table des matières, (b) créé les hyperliens internes et externes (c) ajouté des illustrations, pertinentes comme les liens Web.
La réflexion de l’auteur porte sur la cosmogonie, la centralité du Bovin, la religion, le divin, le couple Kumen/Foroforondu, le pastoralisme, les corrélations avec les sociétés voisines (Wolof, Jola, etc.). Le document met en exergue la croyance monothéiste en  Geno, l’Etre Suprême, que les Fulɓe adoraient des millénaires avant l’arrivée de l’Islam. D’où l’interchangeabilité des noms sacrés Geno et Allah dans la littérature ajamiyya islamique, sous la plume des saints et érudits musulmans, sur toute l’aire culturelle du Pulaaku, de la Mauritanie au Cameroun. Par exemple, la treizième strophe (vers 16 et 17) de la sublime Introduction de Oogirde Malal, déclare :

Geno On wi’a: « Kallaa ! ɗum waɗataa
Nafataa han nimse e wullitagol! »

L’Eternel dira : « Plus jamais ! Cela ne sera point !
A présent inutiles les regrets et les plaintes !

Le nom de Geno est fréquent sous la plume de Tierno Muhammadu Samba Mombeya, Usman ɓii Foduyee, Sheku Amadu Bari, Moodi Adama, Cerno Bokar Salif Taal, Tierno Aliyyu Ɓuuɓa Ndiyan, Amadou Hampâté Bâ, etc.

Table des matières

  • Introduction
  • Symbolisme et vision du monde peul
  • L’Autre féminin de Koumen
  • Le paradoxe, dimension du symbole
  • Le grand jeu de la réalité
  • Aux origines premières du monde
  • Le lion est un voyant
  • Foroforondou
  • Koumen le Pasteur divin
  • Une façon originale d’habiter le monde

Ardue mais bonne lecture à la découverte du Pulaaku antique et ésotérique, ni banal ou vulgaire !

Tierno S. Bah

In Memoriam D. W. Arnott (1915-2004)

D.W. Arnott. The Nominal and Verbal Systems of Fula
D.W. Arnott. The Nominal and Verbal Systems of Fula

This article creates the webAfriqa homage and tribute to the memory of Professor David W. Arnott (1915-2004), foremost linguist, researcher, teacher and publisher on Pular/Fulfulde, the language of the Fulbe/Halpular of West and Central Africa. It is reproduces the obituary written in 2004 par Philip J. Jaggar. David Arnott belonged in the category of colonial administrators who managed to balance their official duties with in-depth social and cultural investigation of the societies their countries ruled. I publish quite a log of them throughout the webAfriqa Portal: Vieillard, Dieterlen, Delafosse, Person, Francis-Lacroix, Germain, etc.
The plan is to contributed to disseminate as much as possible the intellectual legacy of Arnott’s. Therefore, the links below are just part of the initial batch :

Tierno S. Bah


D. W. Arnott was a distinguished scholar and teacher of West African languages, principally Fulani (also known as Fula, Fulfulde and Pulaar) and Tiv, David Whitehorn Arnott, Africanist: born London 23 June 1915; Lecturer, then Reader, Africa Department, School of Oriental and African Studies 1951-66, Professor of West African Languages 1966-77 (Emeritus); married 1942 Kathleen Coulson (two daughters); died Bedale, North Yorkshire 10 March 2004.

He was one of the last members of a generation of internationally renowned British Africanists/linguists whose early and formative experience of Africa, with its immense and complex variety of peoples and languages, derived from the late colonial era.

Born in London in 1915, the elder son of a Scottish father, Robert, and mother, Nora, David Whitehorn Arnott was educated at Sheringham House School and St Paul’s School in London, before going on to Pembroke College, Cambridge, where he read Classics and won a “half-blue” for water polo. He received his PhD from London University in 1961, writing his dissertation on “The Tense System in Gombe Fula”.

Following graduation in 1939 Arnott joined the Colonial Administrative Service as a district officer in northern Nigeria, where he was posted to Bauchi, Benue and Zaria Provinces, often touring rural areas on a horse or by push bike. His (classical) language background helped him to learn some of the major languages in the area — Fulani, Tiv, and Hausa — and the first two in particular were to become his languages of published scientific investigation.

It was on board ship in a wartime convoy to Cape Town that Arnott met his wife-to-be, Kathleen Coulson, who was at the time a Methodist missionary in Ibadan, Nigeria. They married in Ibadan in 1942, and Kathleen became his constant companion on most of his subsequent postings in Benue and Zaria provinces, together with their two small daughters, Margaret and Rosemary.

From 1951 to 1977, David Arnott was a member of the Africa Department at the School of Oriental and African Studies (Soas), London University, as Lecturer, then Reader, and was appointed Professor of West African Languages in 1966. He spent 1955-56 on research leave in West Africa, conducting a detailed linguistic survey of the many diverse dialects of Fulani, travelling from Nigeria across the southern Saharan edges of Niger, Dahomey (now Benin), Upper Volta, French Sudan (Burkina Faso and Mali), and eventually to Senegal, Gambia, and Guinea. Many of his research notes from this period are deposited in the Soas library (along with other notes, documents and teaching materials relating mainly to Tiv and Hausa poetry and songs).

He was Visiting Professor at University College, Ibadan (1961) and the University of California, Los Angeles (1963), and attended various African language and Unesco congresses in Africa, Europe, and the United States. Between 1970 and 1972 he made a number of visits to Kano, Nigeria, to teach at Abdullahi Bayero College (now Bayero University, Kano), where he also supervised (as Acting Director) the setting up of the Centre for the Study of Nigerian Languages, and I remember a mutual colleague once expressing genuine astonishment that “David never seemed to have made any real enemies”. This was a measure of his integrity, patience and even-handed professionalism, and the high regard in which he was held.

Arnott established his international reputation with his research on Fula(ni), a widely used language of the massive Niger-Congo family which is spoken (as a first language) by an estimated eight million people scattered throughout much of West and Central Africa, from Mauritania and Senegal to Niger, Nigeria, Cameroon, Central African Republic and Chad (as well as the Sudan), many of them nomadic cattle herders.

Between 1956 and 1998 he produced almost 30 (mainly linguistic) publications on Fulani and in 1970 published his magnum opus, The Nominal and Verbal Systems of Fula (an expansion of his PhD dissertation), supplementing earlier works by his predecessors, the leading British and German scholars F.W. Taylor and August Klingenheben. In this major study of the Gombe (north-east Nigeria) dialect, he described, in clear and succinct terms, the complex system of 20 or more so-called “noun classes” (a classificatory system widespread throughout the Niger-Congo family which marks singular/plural pairs, often distinguishing humans, animals, plants, mass nouns and liquids). The book also advanced our understanding of the (verbal) tense- aspect and conjugational system of Fulani. His published research encompassed, too, Fulani literature and music.

In addition to Fulani, Arnott also worked on Tiv, another Niger-Congo language mainly spoken in east/central Nigeria, and from the late 1950s onwards he wrote more than 10 articles, including several innovative treatments of Tiv tone and verbal conjugations, in addition to a paper comparing the noun-class systems of Fulani and Tiv (“Some Reflections on the Content of Individual Classes in Fula and Tiv”, La Classification Nominale dans les Langues Négro-Africaines, 1967). Some of his carefully transcribed Tiv data and insightful analyses were subsequently used by theoretical linguists following the generative (“autosegmental”) approach to sound systems. (His colleague at Soas the renowned Africanist R.C. Abraham had already published grammars and a dictionary of Tiv in the 1930s and 1940s.)

In addition to Fulani and Tiv, Arnott taught undergraduate Hausa-language classes at Soas for many years, together with F.W. (“Freddie”) Parsons, the pre-eminent Hausa scholar of his era, and Jack Carnochan and Courtenay Gidley. He also pioneered the academic study of Hausa poetry at Soas, publishing several articles on the subject, and encouraged the establishment of an academic pathway in African oral literature.

The early 1960s were a time when the available language-teaching materials were relatively sparse (we had basically to make do with cyclostyled handouts), but he overcame these resource problems by organising class lessons with great care and attention, displaying a welcome ability to synthesise and explain language facts and patterns in a simple and coherent manner. He supervised a number of PhD dissertations on West African languages (and literature), including the first linguistic study of the Hausa language written by a native Hausa speaker, M.K.M. Galadanci (1969). He was genuinely liked and admired by his students.

David Arnott was a quiet man of deep faith who was devoted to his family. Following his retirement he and Kathleen moved to Moffat in Dumfriesshire (his father had been born in the county). In 1992 they moved again, to Bedale in North Yorkshire (where he joined the local church and golf club), in order to be nearer to their two daughters, and grandchildren.

Philip J. Jaggar
The Independent

Fulani Proverbial Lore and Word-Play

D. W. Arnott first published this paper in 1957 under the title “Proverbial Lore and Word-Play of the Fulani” (Africa. Volume 27, Issue 4, October 1957, pp. 379-396). I have shortened it a bit for web search engines.
Only the summaries are posted here, pending publication of the full text of the document.
See also: In Memoriam  Professor D. W. Arnott (1915-2004)
Tierno S. Bah

Abstract

The wit and wisdom of the Fulani, as of other African peoples, are expressed most characteristically in their proverbs and riddles. Their proverbs are amply illustrated by the collections of H. Gaden and C. E. J. Whitting, and a selection of riddles appeared in a recent article in Africa by M. Dupire and the Marquis de Tressan. But there are other types of oral literature—both light and serious—which various writers have mentioned, without quoting examples. So Mlle Dupire refers to formes litteraires alambiquées and ritournelles des enfants Bororo, and G. Pfeffer, in his article on ‘Prose and Poetry of the Fulbe,’ speaks of jokes and tongue-twisters. The aim of this article is to present some examples of these types of proverbial lore and word-play—epigrams, tongue-twisters, and chain-rhymes—which were recorded, along with many more riddles and proverbs, in the course of linguistic research during a recent tour of the Fula-speaking areas of West Africa, and to consider their relation to proverbs and riddles. These types of oral literature are of course by no means peculiar to the Fulani, and a number of the examples here quoted may well have parallels in other languages of West Africa or farther afield. But an examination of such pieces in one language may perhaps contribute something to the general study of this kind of lore.

Résumé
Proverbes et devinettes peules

Bien que les proverbes et les devinettes soient l’expression la plus caractéristique de l’esprit et de la sagesse des Peuls, il existe d’autres types de littérature orale—des épigrammes, des phrases difficiles à prononcer et des rimes enchaînées — qui partagent certaines particularités avec eux.
Les devinettes ne sont pas basées sur un jeu de mots, comme la plupart des devinettes anglaises, mais sur un jeu d’idées ou d’images (généralement visuelles, mais quelquefois auditives, ou une combinaison des deux), la comparaison de deux phénomènes qui se ressemblent par leur situation, leur caractère ou leur comportement. Quelquefois la devinette est posée en termes généraux et celui qui veut la résoudre doit trouver la particularité appropriée; mais ordinairement une particularité est donnée et celui qui cherche à résoudre la devinette doit choisir correctement ses traits saillants et trouver un autre objet ayant les mêmes traits.

De même, certains proverbes énoncent un principe général, mais la grande majorité, tout en donnant un exemple d’un principe général, sont exprimés en termes d’une situation particulière. Leur application à d’autres situations entraîne un procès de comparaison analogue à celui associé avec l’invention et la solution de devinettes.

Les épigrammes, comme les proverbes, sont des considérations aphoristiques sur la vie, mais elles sont plus longues et plus compliquées. Elles consistent en un rapprochement de plusieurs phénomènes ayant des caractéristiques générales en commun qui sont habituellement disposés par trois ou par groupes de trois ; les caractéristiques générales peuvent être décrites ou rester implicites, tandis qu’un troisième type classe plusieurs objets apparentés en catégories nettes.

Ces épigrammes ont une structure formelle typique et diverses autres particularités qui les distinguent du langage ordinaire, et qu’ils partagent dans une mesure plus ou moins grande avec les proverbes et les devinettes — une légère anomalie grammaticale, une régularité cadencée et certains procédés stylistiques, tels que la répétition des phrases parallèles et l’assonance basée sur l’utilisation de suffixes identiques.

La structure de la langue peule se prête à de telles assonances et également à la ‘ jonglerie ’ verbale de phrases difficiles à prononcer, tandis que la subtilité de celles-ci égale l’ingénuosité des rimes enchaînées. Ces dernières consistent en un enchaînement d’idées où le dernier mot de chaque ligne évoque le thème de la ligne suivante. Elles montrent également quelques unes des particularités stylistiques et autres, déjà constatées dans les épigrammes, les proverbes et les devinettes. Ainsi, les divers types de littérature orale peule, dont certains sont frivoles et d’autres sont sérieux, sont rapprochés par ces caractéristiques communes comme des éléments intimement liés d’une seule tradition littéraire.

D.W. Arnott

Les visages du Fuuta-Jalon. Des campagnes en mutation

Case (suudu) et jardin menager (suntuure) au Fuuta-Jalon
Case (suudu) et jardin (suntuure) au Fuuta-Jalon

Fondée en 1948, la revue scientifique Cahiers d’Outre-mer a survécu aux changements de la vague des indépendances des années 1960, qui  entraînèrent la disparition de plusieurs publications coloniales. On trouvera ici le premier d’une série d’articles sur la Guinée, publié dans les Cahiers.
Métholodologie oblige, peut-être, mais le document se concentre sur l’espace, la géographie et l’environnement. Ce faisant, il escamote l’histoire et effleure seulement la société pluri-ethnique du pays. Ainsi, l’article commence par une vague référence à l’ouverture de la Guinée en 1984. Il indique certes que “la recherche en sciences humaines accuse un retard préjudiciable depuis la Première République”. Mais il ne dit rien sur le type de fermeture du pays avant le coup d’Etat militaire du 3 avril. Et il reste silencieux sur les conséquences de ce changement important. C’est dommage, car en intégrant mieux les divers aspects de l’évolution du Fuuta-Jalon, les auteurs auraient pu mener une étude plus riche. Un passage laconique et atypique d’un papier scientifique se lit au point 58.  Q’entendent les auteurs par la formule prescriptive et autoritaire: « Il faut bannir l’idée d’Un terroir fuutanien… » !!!
Cela dit, au lieu de la transcription francisée de l’original (imprimé et électronique et à l’exception de la Bibliographie et des Notes), la présente édition se conforme à l’Alphabet standard du Pular-Fulfulde. Ce système reflète mieux la sémantique de la langue, et est plus fidèle à ses nuances, s’agissant,  par exemple, des noms de lieux et de personnes, des vocables désignant l’ethnie, la langue, etc.)  Ainsi on lira : aynde (sing.)/ayɗe (plur.), boowal (sing.)/boowe (plur.), diiwal, maccuɓe, Pullo, Fulɓe, Pular, Fuuta-Jalon, Doŋel, Bantiŋel, Wuree-Kaba, etc. au lieu de : aïndés, bowés, diwal, Peul/Peuls, Fouta-Djalon, Donguel,  Bantignel, Ouré-Kaba, etc.
Enfin, cette version inclut des hyperliens absents dans le texte d’origine, accessible sur Revues.org
Tierno S. Bah


Véronique André et Gilles Pestaña
“Les visages du Fouta-Djalon. Des campagnes en mutation : des représentations au terrain.”
Les Cahiers d’Outre-Mer. Revue de géographie de Bordeaux, no. 217, 2002. p. 63-88

Résumé
Le Fuuta-Jalon (République de Guinée) dispose d’une image forte digne d’une image d’Epinal. Il est le “château d’eau de l’Afrique de l’Ouest” dégradé et menacé par des pratiques agropastorales prédatrices. Nous identifierons et caractériserons tout d’abord les représentations usuelles qui le fondent ce discours “officiel”. Puis l’analyse de deux campagnes du Fuuta-Jalon nous permettra de nuancer cette image et d’en montrer les limites, en tant qu’état de référence. Enfin nous dégagerons les dynamiques sociales et environnementales actuelles qui animent le Fuuta-Jalon et engagent à reconsidérer les fondements mêmes de ses représentations.

Abstract
“The Different Faces of Fuuta-Jalon, Republic of Guinea and the changing Countrysides : Representations Observed in the Field.” Fuuta-Jalon, in the Republic of Guinea, presents a picture worthy of a picture of Epinal. It is the “water tower of western Africa”, deteriorated and threatened by predatory agro-pastoral practices. We first identify and characterize the customary representations which render this discourse “official”. Next, the analyses of two countrysides in the Fuuta-Jalon area enables us to refine this picture and show the limits of it, as regards its use as a reference base. Finally, we describe the present social and environmental dynamics which prevail in Fuuta-Jalon and endeavor to reconsider the very foundations of its representations.

Plan

Les représentations : uniformité des campagnes et dégradation de l’environnement

Quelques enseignements du terrain

1. — Lorsque la Guinée s’ouvre en 1984, les opérations de développement se multiplient au Fuuta-Jalon. Elles donnent lieu à toute une série de rapports d’experts et de diagnostics de nature très hétérogène, menés dans un cloisonnement relatif et largement fondés sur des analyses anciennes, alors même que la recherche en sciences humaines accuse un retard préjudiciable depuis la Première République. Cette littérature “grise” fatalement ciblée et répondant à des objectifs d’opérationalité forts distincts de ceux de la recherche, a fini par forger et conforter une certaine représentation géographique du Fuuta-Jalon touchant aux relations entre la société fulɓe et le milieu qu’elle exploite. Elle a abouti à la construction d’un scénario catastrophe reposant sur l’idée que des pratiques paysannes extensives seraient, dans un contexte de pression démographique, une menace pour l’environnement du Fuuta-Jalon, menace suffisante pour mettre en péril le « château d’eau de l’Afrique de l’Ouest ». Or, des recherches récentes sur le terrain1 ont ouvert un certain nombre de réflexions sur la nature et la validité de ces représentations. Entre la vision stéréotypée et monolithique du FuUta-Jalon telle qu’elle apparaît dans les descriptions classiques et la dynamique actuelle des campagnes, il existe en effet un net décalage, dont il s’agit de comprendre les raisons.

Les représentations : uniformité des campagnes et dégradation de l’environnement
2. — Une représentation d’un lieu, d’un phénomène ou d’un groupe humain est par essence subjective. Identifier et caractériser les grands thèmes des représentations usuelles et donc du discours officiel sur le Fuuta-Jalon permettra par la suite d’en montrer les limites.

Le Fuuta-Jalon : une délimitation délicate mais une image forte
3. — La représentation la plus courante considère le Fuuta-Jalon comme une région homogène et l’assimile aux seuls hauts plateaux. C’est à la fois “le château d’eau de l’Afrique de l’Ouest” avec ses plateaux échancrés de vallées, le pays des Fulɓe et de leurs boeufs, le lieu de construction d’un Etat structuré pré-colonial, un espace de fortes densités rurales, une terre baignée d’Islam, etc. Autrement dit, le Fuuta-Jalon serait simultanément une région naturelle, historique, agricole, démographique… en somme une région homogène, une “vraie” région. Cette perception est confortée par le fait que la région dispose d’une dénomination propre, “Fuuta-Jalon”, contrairement aux autres régions du pays pourtant proclamées “naturelles” elles aussi : Guinée Maritime, Haute Guinée et Guinée Forestière.

4. — Il n’est pas innocent de la part des pouvoirs coloniaux, puis de la Première République d’avoir rebaptisé “Moyenne Guinée” ce qui correspondrait au Fuuta-Jalon. Manifestement, pour le pouvoir politique, “le” Fuuta-Jalon passait pour une région suffisamment homogène des points de vue géographique, historique, ethnique, religieux, voire économique pour détenir une identité susceptible de menacer à terme l’unité de la colonie puis de la nation guinéenne. L’appellation plus neutre de “Moyenne Guinée” permettait de gommer en partie cette représentation identitaire.

5. — Cependant, rebaptiser ou redécouper un espace ne suffit pas à en modifier rapidement ses représentations géographiques. En fait, personne ne songe à imaginer que le Fuuta-Jalon n’est pas une région, même si tout le monde est bien en peine d’en tracer les limites. Cet espace recouvre t-il une réalité historique, géologique, ethnique ou simplement administrative? La façon la plus simple d’éluder la question est d’assimiler le Fuuta-Jalon à la région administrative et soi-disant “naturelle” de Moyenne Guinée.

Quelques postulats trompeurs
6. — S’il est évident que nulle délimitation géographique du Fuuta-Jalon ne fait l’unanimité, son assimilation aux seuls hauts plateaux pose également problème. Or s’est imposée une image d’un Fuuta homogène pouvant se résumer aux caractéristiques de ces hauts plateaux ou plateaux centraux.

Les plateaux centraux, expression géographique du “vrai Fuuta”
7. — Etendus du Nord au Sud, de Mali à Dalaba, les hauts plateaux entaillés par un chevelu hydrographique dense culminent entre 1 000 et 1 500 m. Consacré “pays des eaux vives” (proverbe Pular cité par Gilbert Vieillard, 1940), le Fuuta-Jalon est le domaine d’une savane arborée installée sur des sols minces et médiocres alternant avec une maigre prairie sur boowal. Subsistent ça et là sur les versants des fragments de forêt mésophile 2, reliques supposées d’une grande forêt dense qui aurait hélas aujourd’hui disparu, si l’on en croit une légende tenace partagée par les divers intervenants depuis la période coloniale.

8. — La plupart du temps la littérature grise se borne à la description de cette ossature principale et structurante, considérée comme le coeur du Fuuta et assimilée in fine à la totalité de la région. Une image d’un milieu fuutanien stéréotypé est ainsi née montrant des paysages très anthropisés où alternent espaces tabulaires presque dénudés comme les Timbis, collines aux versants largement déboisés, et parcelles mises en culture. La physionomie des hauts plateaux, devenue l’étendard du Fuuta-Jalon, serait représentative de l’ensemble du Fuuta-Jalon et constituerait le “vrai Fouta”.

Le pays des Fulɓe et des fortes densités
9. — Un autre raccourci répandu consiste à considérer le Fuuta-Jalon comme un espace strictement « fulɓe » et en proie au surpeuplement.

10. — Au XVIIIe siècle, la fondation du royaume théocratique du Fuuta-Jalon asseoit une domination politique de l’ethnie fulɓe et instaure un système social et économique fondé sur la distinction hommes libres-esclaves. Les esclaves proviennent de razzias, d’achats ou, plus rarement semble-t-il, des populations animistes asservies sur place et appartenant à des ethnies différentes (Suret-Canale 1969 ; Botte, 1994). Une société rurale très structurée et marquée par un contrôle social de l’espace s’est alors mise en place. Les maîtres, se consacrant exclusivement à la lecture du Coran, à leurs boeufs et à la guerre, s’installent sur les doŋe (sing. doŋol), hauteurs peu fertiles des terroirs, laissant les zones basses (ayɗe, sing. aynde) plus fertiles mais insalubres, à leurs captifs (maccuɓe), chargés de les servir et de les nourrir. Sous la colonisation et la Première République, la captivité disparaît peu à peu, les maîtres se font agriculteurs et les différences de modes de vie s’estompent. Avec le temps, la mosaïque ethnique s’est brouillée à la faveur d’une assimilation réelle ou décrétée au point de considérer le Fuuta comme “le pays des Peuls” (Detraux, 1991, p.69).

Erratum. Il est simpliste et erroné de réduire la société du Fuuta-Jalon théocratique (1725-1897) à la dichotomie “libres-esclaves”. En fait, la stratification sociale comportait cinq niveaux, de la base au sommet : (a) la couche servile ou huuwooɓe/maccuɓe, (b) les castes ou nyeeynuɓe : forgerons, coordonniers, boisseliers, potiers, etc. (c) les allogènes ou tuŋarankooɓe (Sarakole, Jakanke), (d) les hommes libres et non dirigeants ou rimɓe, (a) la couche dirigeante ou lamɓe avec son allié le clergé ou seeremɓe.
Par ailleurs, il est ridicule d’affirmer que “la captivité disparaît peu à peu” sous la colonisation (1898-1958) et ce que les auteurs appellent de façon euphémique la Première république (1958-1984). En réalité, la France coloniale substitua sa rude hégémonie au sytème de servilité domestique. Elle pratiqua l’esclavage à grande échelle avec la Traite des Noirs, promulga le Code Noir et pratiqua la ségrégation raciale sous le régime de l’Indigénat. En somme, la France substitua un mal domestique par son propre fléau, précisément celui de l’aliénation globale des populations de son Empire colonial africain, qu’elle appela sauvages, barbares, Nègres, etc.
Quant à la soi-disant Première République de Guinée, les auteurs refusent de l’identifier comme une dictature implacable qui détruisit la maigre infrastructure laissée par la France, tortura et/ou tua des milliers de prisonniers politiques au Camp Boiro. — Tierno S. Bah

11. — Le Fuuta-Jalon est réputé pour ses fortes densités démographiques. En effet, sur les hauts plateaux, des chiffres de 100 habitants/km2 sont régulièrement avancés. Parmi les plus élevés de Guinée, ils sont mis en relation avec un système de production agropastoral jugé consommateur d’espace 3 et font craindre, depuis la période coloniale, l’existence d’une surpopulation inquiétante mais jamais clairement démontrée. Nombreux sont ceux qui l’estiment préjudiciable à la bonne gestion et à la conservation des ressources naturelles, rappelant sans cesse la disparition de la forêt dense fuutanienne 4.

Un système agraire réputé uniforme
12. — A travers la prédominance des Fulɓe, la mise en valeur agro-pastorale a été le facteur prépondérant d’uniformisation du paysage et du système de production.

13. — Le Fuuta-Jalon a pu refléter l’image d’un espace très fortement humanisé et mis en valeur par une population toujours croissante, où la divagation du bétail impose des contraintes lisibles dans le paysage à travers les nombreuses clôtures végétales. L’histoire du peuplement, le poids de l’élevage, les conditions naturelles ont conduit à l’élaboration d’un paysage agraire typique, caractérisé principalement par le diptyque tapades-champs extérieurs. L’espace d’une exploitation agricole s’organise suivant un système de culture à deux composantes : les champs extérieurs (gese, sing. ngesa), sièges d’une agriculture extensive classique en Afrique, et les vastes jardins de case ou tapades, espace de production intensive. A cela s’ajoute l’élevage extensif, principalement bovin, basé sur la divagation.

14. — Les champs extérieurs sont l’oeuvre des hommes qui y pratiquent une culture sur brûlis généralement de fonio ou de riz. L’efficacité et la pérennité du système se fondent sur un temps de culture relativement court (1 à 3 ans), un temps de jachère long (8 à 15 ans) et la disponibilité de terres cultivables.

15. — La tapade, domaine exclusif des femmes, est le lieu des cultures en association (maïs, taro, manioc, arachide, haricot, piment, gombo…). Elle forme une véritable oasis, délimitée par des haies (clôtures) mortes, vives ou mixtes, et marquée par la présence de nombreux arbres fruitiers plantés (manguiers, orangers, avocatiers…), qui forçaient déjà l’admiration des premiers administrateurs coloniaux. Les sols, quelles que soient leurs potentialités d’origine, sont fortement amendés et offrent une remarquable fertilité, régulièrement entretenue.

Erratum. La tapade (hoggo) est l’enclos, la clôture. Elle relève de la responsabilité de l’homme (mari, fils, oncle, neveu, voisin(s), etc). C’est le jardin (suntuure, plur. suntuuji/cuntuuji) qui est le domaine exclusif de la femme (épouse, fille, mère, tante, nièce, voisine(s), etc.) — Tierno S. Bah

16. — Enfin, le système d’élevage présente des spécificités inscrites dans le paysage agraire : au Fuuta, le bétail est roi et ce sont les cultures que l’on parque. Les troupeaux en liberté divaguent au gré des pâtures à leur disposition. L’importance numérique du troupeau a toujours reflété la dignité et le statut social du propriétaire. D’après les textes majeurs qui ont participé à l’élaboration de l’image « officielle », le troupeau ne répondrait à aucun objectif réel de production, ce qui amena le géographe Jacques Richard-Molard à parler du “prétendu élevage foula” (Richard-Mollard, 1944).

Erratum. Un peu dans la veine de Gilbert Vieillard, Jacques Molard éprouva sympathie et affinité pour le pays et les populations du Fuuta-Jalon. Mais son lexique n’échappe pas —tout comme Vieillard, du reste — au langage paternaliste et eurocentriste colonial. Plus d’un demi-siècle après leurs devanciers sus-nommés les auteurs de cet article regardent le Fuuta à travers l’oeillère occidentale. D’où la phrase “le troupeau ne répondrait à aucun objectif réel de production.”  Ils sous-entendent l’application des normes et techniques de l’élevage industriel européen. Au risque de voiler leur propre analyse, Véronique André et Gilles Pestaña décident d’ignorer que l’Afrique, en général, la Guinée et le Fuuta-Jalon, en particulier, n’ont pas fait l’expérience de la Révolution industrielle, qui — pour le meilleur et le pire — propulsa l’hégémonie mondiale de l’Europe. Bref, loin d’être absolue, l’objectivité demeure une notion relative. Pour les Fulɓe l’élevage bovin n’était pas uniquement une activité de production. Il relevait de la cosmogonie avec Geno, le Créateur. Il participait d’une vision du monde et constituait tout un mode de vie, temporel et spirituel. Consulter Koumen, par Amadou Hampâté Bâ et Germaine Dieterlen.  — Tierno S. Bah

17. — L’ensemble de ces représentations du Fuuta a abouti à la construction d’un scénario “catastrophe” reposant sur des dysfonctionnements du système extensif aux conséquences préoccupantes : les pratiques paysannes, surtout dans un contexte de pression démographique croissante, mettraient en péril le “château d’eau de l’Afrique de l’Ouest” menaçant l’intégrité de l’environnement du Fuuta-Jalon.

Une dynamique de dégradation de l’environnement systématiquement dénoncée
18. — Le Fuuta-Jalon fait l’objet de discours récurrents, communs à de nombreuses régions d’Afrique, sur la dégradation du milieu. Les pratiques des pasteurs et agriculteurs sont jugés quasi unanimement comme responsables de la destruction des ressources. L’existence d’un cercle vicieux de dégradation de l’environnement lié à une pression démographique trop forte et incontrôlée est donc depuis longtemps admis sans réserve, et utilisé par la plupart des intervenants.

19. — Ce discours n’est pas nouveau. Depuis la colonisation française et jusqu’à ce jour, les administrateurs, les chercheurs et les techniciens n’ont cessé de s’inquiéter de l’avenir socio-économique et environnemental de cet espace réputé fragile, voué à l’agropastoralisme. Le scénario envisagé s’appuie sur une crise du système agraire dont les composantes sont : pratiques prédatrices, pression démographique, manque de terre, réduction du temps de jachère, appauvrissement des sols, déforestation totale et en définitive érosion catastrophique 5.

20. — Toujours selon les représentations courantes, le fort recul de la forêt (non daté ni évalué) favoriserait notamment une diminution des précipitations, l’irrégularité des débits des cours d’eau et même leur tarissement en saison sèche, donc une certaine “aridification” 6. La réduction drastique des temps de jachère, l’incendie répété des forêts et savanes auraient détruit peu à peu le sol, appauvri la flore en diminuant inévitablement la biodiversité, et favorisé l’action destructrice de l’érosion. Certains continuent de penser que les fameux boowe seraient le résultat terminal de l’évolution des sols ferrallitiques sous l’influence des feux de brousse associée à la déforestation de “la vaste forêt originelle” 7.

21. — C’est la fonction même de “château d’eau de l’Afrique de l’Ouest” qui serait directement mise en péril. Les conséquences pourraient s’avérer dramatiques, comme l’illustre une allocution du Ministre de l’Agriculture, de l’Elevage et de la Forêt, lors du séminaire sur le programme régional d’aménagement des bassins versants du Haut Niger et de la Haute Gambie à Conakry en mars 1995 : “Quand un arbre brûle au Fuuta-Jalon, c’est le taux de carbone qui augmente dans l’atmosphère, c’est un affluent du Niger ou de la Gambie qui verra son écoulement perturbé, c’est Tombouctou qui manquera d’eau en fin de saison sèche”. Ainsi les avis sont-ils unanimes, soutenant l’impérieuse nécessité d’intervenir pour “restaurer” et “protéger” le massif du Fuuta-Jalon. De nombreux projets poursuivant cette seule fin ont donc été mis en oeuvre dont le plus important reste le projet d’envergure régional « Restauration et protection du massif du Fuuta-Jalon », initié par l’O.U.A. en 1979.

22. — De cet exposé rapide sur les représentations de l’espace régional et de sa gestion par les paysans, l’image d’une région relativement homogène mais menacée par l’Homme domine. Les principales idées récurrentes caractérisant le Fuuta-Jalon ont été ici évoquées. Cette image issue de la période coloniale et non exempte de néo-malthusiannisme, s’est trouvée renforcée sinon confortée par le paradigme du développement durable et le rôle des projets de développement rural. Ceux-ci ont largement contribué à diffuser, ou tout au moins à entretenir, l’image d’un Fuuta-Jalon à la géographie monolithique 8. Simples exécutants de politiques pensées en amont, les artisans des projets n’ont pas pu nuancer ou remettre en cause les représentations majoritaires et ont même accentué une vision catastrophiste de l’avenir, justifiant alors des interventions extérieures lourdes. Traversant trois régimes politiques très différents, ces représentations se sont édifiées, renforcées jusqu’à devenir une caricature parfois dogmatique.

Quelques enseignements du terrain
23. — Afin de mettre à l’épreuve les représentations de la région, de ses systèmes ruraux et de ses problématiques environnementales, la comparaison de deux campagnes 9 du Fuuta-Jalon permet de prendre la mesure du risque à considérer ces représentations comme vérités absolues.

Deux campagnes, deux visages
24. — Les espaces ruraux comparés sont tous deux inclus dans les Fuuta-Jalon historique, climatique, géologique, ethnique et dans le Fuuta-Jalon administratif c’est-à-dire la Moyenne Guinée (fig. 1). La campagne au sud de Wuree-Kaba sera comparée à celle proche du centre urbain de Pita (environs de Bantiŋel et des Timbis).

Un espace de transition et de contact (Wuree-Kaba) et une campagne des hauts plateaux (Pita)
25. — La campagne de Wuree-Kaba s’étend à l’extrême sud-est du Fuuta-Jalon et appartient administrativement à la préfecture de Mamou. Formée de croupes granitiques de basse altitude, en moyenne 300 m, qui donnent au paysage un aspect assez accidenté, cette campagne se situe dans une zone de transition entre les influences montagnardes des hauts plateaux et celles plus soudaniennes de Haute Guinée. Les précipitations y sont plus abondantes (autour de 1800 mm), les températures plus chaudes et la végétation plus fournie que celles des hauts plateaux fuutaniens.

26. — Périphérie du Fuuta physique, Wuree-Kaba appartenait au diwal de Timbo et correspond à une ancienne marche historique. Offrant un caractère frontalier (avec la Sierra Léone), elle constitue aussi une zone de contact entre les populations fulɓe et malinké qui se sont partagées le territoire jusqu’à aujourd’hui. Si les Malinké sont cultivateurs, les Fulɓe sont demeurés pour l’essentiel des éleveurs nomades ou semi-sédentaires.

27. — La région de Pita situé au coeur du Fuuta, appartient à la dorsale des hauts plateaux et présente dans la région des Timbis, au nord-ouest, un aspect tabulaire (dénommée abusivement “plaine” des Timbis) comme dans la zone de Bantiŋel au nord-est. Le caractère semi-montagnard y est nettement affirmé avec une amplitude thermique annuelle plus marquée que dans la région de Wuree-Kaba. Le couvert végétal herbacé ou arbustif est discontinu à l’exception des forêts galeries. La région constitue l’un des bastions du Fuuta théocratique et la population fulɓe est fortement majoritaire, d’autant que les descendants des captifs tendent à s’y fondre. Tous les ruraux sont ici des sédentaires principalement cultivateurs.

Deux contextes démographiques
28. — L’inégale densité de population marque une première différence de taille entre les deux campagnes. La campagne de Pita avec 70 à 100 habitants/km2 apparaît comme relativement peuplée à l’échelle du Fuuta-Jalon mais aussi à l’échelle de l’Afrique de l’Ouest. Ces chiffres traduisent une sédentarisation déjà ancienne et une forte emprise humaine sur un paysage largement façonné par le système agraire.

29. — A l’opposé, la campagne de Wuree-Kaba paraît peu peuplée au sein du Fuuta avec seulement de 10 à 15 habitants/km2. La population actuellement résidente est encore en voie de sédentarisation. Les éléments les plus fixes sont les cultivateurs malinké. Les Fulɓe quant à eux se répartissent schéma-tiquement dans deux catégories : les semi-sédentaires, d’une part, réinstallés durablement depuis la chute de la Première République ; les nomades d’autre part, qui suivent leurs boeufs au gré des zones de pâturage favorables et dont l’installation temporaire repose sur des accords passés avec les propriétaires fulɓe et malinké.

Deux systèmes agro-pastoraux aux fonctionnements distincts
30. — Il existe donc d’une part, une campagne où l’emprise humaine est suf-fisamment forte et ancienne pour avoir façonné un paysage agraire établi et d’autre part, une campagne où la population récemment installée ou réinstallée n’a engendré qu’un paysage agraire “sommaire” et instable.

31. — La tapade n’est pas systématique au Fuuta-Jalon.

32. — Dans la région de Pita, les vastes tapades représentent le socle du système de production puisqu’il s’agit du seul espace agricole pérenne et commun à toutes les familles. Elles constituent un élément fondamental du paysage, véritables îlots de verdure construits et dont les haies plantées démontrent un savoir-faire accumulé depuis des générations.

33. — A Wuree-Kaba, pas de trace de tapade : au mieux, il existe une haie morte sommaire autour des cases rudimentaires et rares sont les arbres fruitiers et les cultures pratiquées à proximité des habitations. Cette absence peut s’expliquer par une sédentarisation encore fragile, l’influence des Malinké qui n’ont traditionnellement pas de tapade, et l’omnipotence de l’élevage qui impose déjà de gros efforts pour ceinturer les champs extérieurs.

34. — Les champs extérieurs : différence de nature, différence de gestion.

35. — Dans la région de Pita, l’exploitation des champs extérieurs est l’objet d’une concertation collective qui permet de mieux gérer les ressources naturelles et favorise une meilleure protection des cultures contre la divagation du bétail. Le fonio constitue la culture principale sur des sols très pauvres, de type dantari et hollandé 10.

36. — A Wuree-Kaba, il n’y a pas de véritable concertation pour le défrichement des champs extérieurs. Chacun peut cultiver là où il le souhaite à la condition de dresser une clôture protectrice. Ces champs extérieurs cultivés en riz reposent généralement sur des sols hansanghéré 11 relativement fertiles.

Eléments des dynamiques rurales et environnementales
37. — Deux campagnes, deux visages, deux trajectoires : la combinaison des différents facteurs identifiés précédemment implique une divergence tangible des transformations sociales, économiques et environnementales des campagnes.

38. — Des dynamiques démographiques divergentes.

39. — Les deux campagnes connaissent bien entendu un accroissement naturel relativement élevé mais le solde migratoire constitue un critère majeur de différenciation des dynamiques démographiques.

40. — Wuree-Kaba : une campagne en peuplement : La campagne au sud de Wuree-Kaba constitue un cas sans doute rare au Fuuta-Jalon puisque les arrivants sont aujourd’hui plus nombreux que ceux qui partent. Le retour de la Sierra Léone représente un facteur conjoncturel auquel se combine une évolution plus structurelle, la sédentarisation, même si celle-ci paraît encore hésitante.

Note. Cet influx était peut-être conjoncturel et était provoqué par  la présence de refugiés fuyant la guerre civile de Sierra Léone toute proche. Lire “La Guinée dans les guerres dans la sous-région du Fleuve Mano: une implication dangereuse” in Lansana Conté. Incertitudes autour d’une Fin de Règne (2003). —Tierno S. Bah

41. — Un exode rural sensible dans la campagne de Pita : La campagne de Pita connaît un exode rural conséquent, phénomène des plus répandus au Fuuta-Jalon et qui n’est pas l’apanage des seuls hauts plateaux. Les hommes, surtout s’ils sont jeunes, ont une plus forte propension à l’émigration temporaire ou définitive. Dans la sous-préfecture de Timbi-Madina, 48% des maris sont absents et 79% des jeunes hommes sont partis à Conakry ou à l’étranger (Beck, 1990). Dans les villages, les hommes et les adolescents se font rares, particulièrement en saison sèche, lorsque le travail est moindre.

Composition et recomposition : deux trajectoires pour les systèmes ruraux
42. — Wuree-Kaba : un espace abondant à conquérir, une campagne en construction. Toutes proportions gardées, la situation actuelle du système agraire de la campagne de Wuree-Kaba donne des éléments de compréhension sur la sédentarisation des populations et l’évolution du système agraire dans celle de Pita d’il y a trois siècles et peut-être davantage. En effet, cette campagne apparaît en pleine composition ou construction avec l’arrivée de nouvelles familles. Il reste encore suffisamment d’espace pour défricher ou brûler “librement” à des fins culturales ou pastorales. L’abondance des terres, la facilité d’accès au foncier engagent à des pratiques extensives d’élevage et de culture, mais aussi d’une certaine façon à des pratiques extensives de peuplement. Ces pratiques extensives renvoient au moins à deux logiques : une logique économique et une logique sociale. La logique économique de l’extensif a notamment été évoquée par P. Pélissier (1978, p.5) qui à l’aide de multiples exemples indique, à juste titre, que pour le paysan africain “la productivité maxima du travail est assurée par la consommation de l’espace” (Couty, 1988, l’a également calculé en économie). La logique sociale s’inscrit dans le besoin de conquérir l’espace disponible, de le marquer socialement. L’exploitation extensive permet ainsi d’affirmer son droit d’usage et de s’assurer du “contrôle foncier” (Pélissier, 1978, p. 7).

43. — Ces logiques permettent de mieux appréhender les dynamiques du système rural. Le genre de vie (une sédentarisation balbutiante) et le besoin de marquer le territoire expliquent que l’habitat soit beaucoup plus dispersé que dans la campagne de Pita dont la population est depuis longtemps établie. La volonté de contrôler l’espace explique aussi que les paysans (même malinké) défrichent des superficies plus vastes que celles qu’ils pourront réellement cultiver. En schématisant, les pratiques extensives exacerbées correspondent à une course au défrichement.

44. — L’absence de tapade est à la fois un indice et une conséquence des logiques évoquées. Une installation très récente et encore hésitante hypothèque toute velléité d’élaboration et d’entretien d’un jardin de case (plantation de fruitiers, construction d’une haie et transfert de fertilité). Malgré des conditions favorables (déjections abondantes) le besoin de réaliser un espace de production intensive ne se fait pas encore sentir. De plus, le régime alimentaire rudimentaire des Fulɓe, composé essentiellement de riz et de lait se passe pour l’instant de tous les produits généralement cultivés dans la tapade. L’espace agricole de Wuree-Kaba ne montre pas aujourd’hui de caractère de saturation. Cependant, dans les faits, deux systèmes agraires cohabitent, l’un plus agricole (malinké), l’autre plus pastoral (fulɓe). Leur coexistence génère des conflits d’usages des ressources mais sans remettre en cause ni le fonctionnement ni la reproduction à court terme de ces systèmes agraires. Par contre les pratiques extensives et expéditives, et la cohabitation de deux systèmes agraires, favorisent une gestion des ressources assez désordonnée. “Course au défrichement” et besoins croissants en bois de clôture pour les champs se conjuguent pour exercer une pression tangible sur les ressources ligneuses notamment. Celles-ci ne manquent pas mais sont fortement sollicitées.

Note. Pour une description détaillée et fiable du jardin ménager (suntuure), lire William Derman, “The Economy of the Fouta-Djallon” et “Women’s Gardens” in Serfs, Peasants, and Socialists: A former Serf Village in the Republic of Guinea (1968). — Tierno S. Bah

45. — Les périodes de crise des systèmes agraires sont en général souvent considérées comme propices à une pression accrue sur l’environnement. Ici, au contraire, une forte pression anthropique s’exerce sur les ressources alors même que le contexte se caractérise par une faible densité démographique et un équilibre momentané du système.

46. — Pita : une campagne en voie de recomposition : La campagne qui s’étend autour de Pita traverse une période de recomposition du système agraire et plus globalement peut-être du système rural. Le paysage est ici entièrement anthropisé, et la gestion du terroir villageois suit des règles collectives. Ici, peut-être plus que partout ailleurs, la pression démographique a été crainte puis utilisée pour expliquer la pauvreté des sols, le manque de terre, la diminution du temps de jachère puis l’exode rural. Gilbert Vieillard, dont l’oeuvre ethnologique est pourtant des plus précieuses et respectables, se lamentait : “Dans le Labé, et surtout dans les Timbis, le spectacle de la campagne évoque une campagne française. Il n’y a plus d’arbres qu’autour des habitations, les plaines sont nues, en jachère ou en culture, et malheureusement souvent épuisées : on est arrivé au dernier stade, après lequel il n’y a plus qu’à émigrer pour cultiver ailleurs” (G. Vieillard, 1940, p.197).

47. — La pauvreté des sols dans la campagne de Pita fait l’unanimité ; son origine est fondamentalement intrinsèque et finalement assez peu anthropique. Bantiŋel et plus encore Timbi-Madina se caractérisent par la prépondérance de sols pauvres de type dantari et hollandé (un quart et un tiers de la superficie des sous-préfectures) La maigreur des repousses végétales lors des périodes de jachère s’explique par la médiocrité chimique des sols et leur faible épaisseur. Cette particularité fonde en partie la prépondérance de la culture de fonio (Digitaria exilis), plante très peu exigeante. Beaucoup ont rendu le fonio responsable de l’épuisement des sols, or il semble plus juste de penser que les agriculteurs pratiquent la seule culture possible étant donné la qualité des sols.

48. — En 1990, les études menées par Jean Vogel (Vogel, 1990) sur la fonioculture décrivent des rotations culturales de 3 à 7 ans de culture suivie de 7 à 9 ans de jachère, avec une utilisation du feu très limitée, voire absente. En 1944, Jacques Richard-Mollard mentionnait : “A Timbi-Madina, l’on ne dépasse guère la 7ème année (de culture), la moyenne s’établit entre 3 et 6 années quand le terrain n’est bon qu’au fonio. Puis jachère de 7 ans”. Autrement dit, contrairement aux idées reçues, la diminution du temps de jachère sur près de 50 ans ne peut être avérée. Il apparaît au contraire une relative stabilité du temps de jachère des champs extérieurs même si l’on ne connaît pas les détails de l’évolution entre ces deux dates. Dans le village de Ndantari, à l’ouest de Pita, le temps de jachère est resté lui aussi constant (4-5 ans) entre 1955 (Mission démographique de Guinée, 1955) et 1997 (enquêtes personnelles). Les paysans déclarent aujourd’hui qu’ils ont individuellement diminué la surface des champs extérieurs cultivés. A proximité de Bantiŋel, les anciens, aujourd’hui bien seuls au village, regrettent que la terre ne soit plus cultivée et sont unanimes pour reconnaître que les temps de repos de la terre augmentent : les champs sont défrichés tous les 10 à 15 ans actuellement au lieu des 7 à 9 ans dans le passé (enquêtes personnelles, 1997).

49. — La non réduction du temps de jachère est étroitement liée d’une manière globale à la recomposition du système rural. L’un des aspects majeurs de cette recomposition correspond aux effets de l’émigration. Outre des impacts directs sur la charge démographique, le facteur émigration se révèle fondamental dans les conséquences indirectes qu’il induit. Le rôle des transferts monétaires, dans les revenus familiaux par exemple, semble loin d’être négligeable (même si les données précises manquent) et audelà pèse sur la physionomie de l’économie et de la société locale. De plus, l’effet le plus décisif de l’émigration reste la fuite des actifs, particulièrement des hommes et des jeunes. Ceux qui restent, les anciens, les enfants et les femmes, ne peuvent pas perpétuer le même système de culture. Ce phénomène est à l’origine d’un repli vers les cultures de tapades. L’emprise spatiale des tapades dans les espaces villageois de la sous-préfecture de Timbi-Madina, est d’ailleurs particulièrement forte : jusqu’à 20 % de la surface totale du terroir.

50. — Le travail de E. Boserup a été très souvent simplifié au point de réduire sa pensée à une évolution qui lierait de manière étroite l’émergence d’un système de culture plus intensif à un accroissement continu de la population. Si cette interprétation peut se vérifier en maintes régions, force est de constater que dans la campagne de Pita, ce n’est pas parce qu’il n’y a plus assez de terres que les paysans se replient sur l’intensif, mais surtout parce qu’il n’y a plus assez d’hommes.

51 L’exode rural n’est pas seul à l’origine d’un recul agricole (économique et/ou spatial). Les activités “secondaires” sont parfois prépondérantes. D’après l’enquête de J.M. Garreau (1993, p. 48) dans les Timbis, seuls 59% des chefs de famille se déclaraient d’abord cultivateurs et au moins 50% des “exploitations” ont un revenu global largement déconnecté de l’agriculture. Dans les 50% restants, pour 25% des exploitations (appartenant aux roundés), la production agricole repose en grande partie sur des cultures intensives (bas-fonds, tapades et champs de pomme de terre) avec un but lucratif clairement affiché. L’exploitation des bas-fonds, par les revenus qui en découlent, apparaît aujourd’hui comme une donnée essentielle dans la campagne de Pita. Un contexte favorable (V. André et G. Pestaña, 1998) a permis à certaines familles de s’orienter vers des spéculations rentables (la pomme de terre ou l’ail par exemple), qui trouvent un débouché national voire international (vers le Sénégal notamment), grâce au dynamisme du marché de Timbi-Madina et à une bonne organisation de l’exportation par l’intermédiaire des commerçants et des transporteurs.

52. — Mais au-delà de la recomposition du système agraire, c’est l’ensemble du système rural qui se modifie. Outre une économie rurale et des ménages de plus en plus extravertis (activités de rente, émigration, transferts monétaires, etc.), la société se transforme avec une redistribution des rôles, et parfois l’émergence de conflits latents ou naissants. Parmi ces évolutions, les femmes en raison d’un pouvoir économique accru, en particulier à la faveur des activités de maraîchage, et de l’absence du mari voient leur rôle redéfini au sein de la famille (V. André et G. Pestaña, 1998). Toutefois, cela ne se passe pas toujours sans heurts ou sans débats au sein des ménages et même des villages. D’autre part, des tensions foncières entre anciennes familles de maîtres et descendants de captifs peuvent ressurgir. Les premiers se réclament propriétaires de terres, notamment de bas-fonds, alors même que les descendants de captifs les cultivent depuis plusieurs générations parfois et en tirent de substantiels revenus.

53. — Au total, la campagne de Pita connaît une évolution non conforme aux représentations classiques, avec un recentrage sur les activités non-agricoles, les espaces de production intensive, et une modification en profondeur de certains rapports socio-économiques. Enfin, la plupart des attaques portées aux pratiques paysannes supposées responsables, à elles seules, de la dégradation de l’environnement ne tiennent plus : le feu est relativement peu usité, les défrichements intensifs et abusifs sont fatalement limités voire inexistants du fait de la pauvreté structurelle d’une grande partie des sols et d’une certaine stagnation et voire une régression des surfaces de champs extérieurs.

54. — Les deux études de cas illustrent le décalage sensible entre certaines représentations du Fuuta-Jalon héritées, et les résultats de travaux de recherches actuels. Elles fondent l’idée d’une réelle diversité des paysages du Fuuta, des populations et des dynamiques rurales, sans pour cela renier l’existence globale d’une région fuutanienne.

Dépasser les caricatures pour mieux comprendre les mutations actuelles
55. — L’accumulation des simplifications et la vétusté des analyses expliquent le hiatus entre les représentations courantes du Fuuta et la situation de nombre de ses campagnes. Prendre acte de cette diversité, c’est tenter de dépasser ou plus modestement enrichir des représentations qui à force de se scléroser tendent à devenir des caricatures, quelque peu vidées de sens. Les contrastes mis en relief dans l’étude comparative de deux campagnes du Fuuta-Jalon fournissent plusieurs entrées permettant de dégager, à l’échelle régionale cette fois, plusieurs facteurs élémentaires de diversité.

Quelques nuances régionales élémentaires

Un éventail de paysages, de potentialités et de terroirs
56. — Le massif du Fuuta-Jalon ne se résume pas aux seuls plateaux “centraux”, et se compose aussi de “la région environnante” : c’est souvent de cette façon que le reste de la région est évoqué 12, alors que cette “périphérie” comprend des hauts lieux de l’histoire du Fuuta Jaloo, tels que Timbo, Kébali ou Fougoumba. Compartimenté, le massif s’organise suivant un système de plateaux étagés. Par l’intermédiaire de gradins successifs, trois niveaux topographiques se superposent. L’axe central constitue le niveau supérieur à partir de 1000 m. A l’est de celui-ci, se localise un niveau topographique inférieur que l’on retrouve de Tougué à Timbo et dont les altitudes varient de 700 à 900 m. Un dernier palier à 300-600 m s’individualise particulièrement bien à l’ouest dans les régions de Télimélé, Gaoual et au sud dans la région de Wuree-Kaba.

57. — Il n’est pas nécessaire d’entrer dans les détails pour rendre compte de la diversité des situations biophysiques au Fuuta-Jalon. Le paramètre climatique donne à lui seul une idée des distinctions nécessaires à établir. Les marches occidentales du Fuuta constituent des espaces plus chauds et humides que les hauts plateaux où se combinent une relative proximité de l’influence océanique, des altitudes plus basses que le reste du massif, une protection des hauts plateaux qui minorent les effets desséchants de l’Harmattan d’origine continentale… En revanche, dans le Fuuta oriental la continentalité s’affirme avec des précipitations moindres et des amplitudes thermiques annuelles plus marquées.
A ces considérations viennent s’ajouter des facteurs azonaux : l’ouverture sur la grande plateforme mandingue favorise le souffle de l’Harmattan en saison sèche et la présence de hauts plateaux à l’ouest limite les précipitations d’hivernage. La végétation présente alors des caractères fortement soudaniens. Enfin, au sein même des hauts plateaux, les vallées profondes qui les morcellent (comme celle de la Kakrima) déterminent des enclaves chaudes et humides, fort originales.

58. — Il faut bannir l’idée d’Un terroir fuutanien : nuances climatiques, topographie, palettes et répartitions des sols se combinent, individualisant des “équations naturelles” variées.

Une configuration sociale plus complexe qu’il n’y paraît
59. — La composition ethnique et les hiérarchies sociales des campagnes du Fuuta-Jalon se présentent comme un puzzle dont de nombreuses pièces seraient manquantes. Il s’agit d’un champ d’étude sensible et encore peu exploité. Moins apparente et lisible que les paysages, la configuration sociale peut influencer l’organisation du système rural à l’échelle locale, même si la composante “ethnique” semble une entrée sans grand intérêt et relever d’une perception aussi obsolète que polémique. A première vue la faible pertinence d’une telle entrée repose sur le postulat que les minorités non fulɓe ont été assimilées et que leurs système agraire et organisation sociale ont subi une “foulanisation”.

Erratum. — Les travaux de Gilbert Vieillard (1940), Cantrelle & Dupire (1964), Telli Diallo (1958),  Thierno Diallo (1972), etc. démontrent que “les hiérarchies sociales” du Fuuta-Jalon théocentrique n’avaient rien d’ambigu. De fait, Telli souligne que la société fuutanienne était “très homogène, fortement disciplinée, hiérarchisée et organisée en une féodalité théocratique.” A l’opposé donc de tout “puzzle” indéchiffrable ! Concrètement, le Fuuta-Jalon formait une pyramide solide reposant sur (a) la communauté rurale groupée autour de la mosquée (misiide, de l’arabe masjid), (b) le siège du pouvoir provincial (diiwal (plur. diiwe), de l’arabe dîwân), pièce maîtresse de l’Etat confédéral dirigé par l’Almami à partir de Timbo. Les individus et groupes n’étaient pas non plus des pièces flottantes. Au contraire, ils s’intégraient aux lignages ancestraux, aux clans et aux quatre tribus  patronymiques : Baa, Bari, Jallo, Soo. Hampâté Bâ indique cette organisation quadripartite correspond aux quatre élements fondamentaux (eau, air, terre, lumière), aux quatre points cardinaux (nord, sud, est, ouest), et aux quatres couleurs principales de la robe de la vache. — Tierno S. Bah

60. — Si un tel postulat peut se vérifier en de nombreux lieux et notamment dans les plateaux centraux, il demeure bien hasardeux dès que l’on s’éloigne du Fuuta central. En fait, de nombreuses poches de minorités subsistent. Par exemple, les Dialonké du Sangala sont majoritaires au nord-est de Koubia, dans les campagnes proches de Balaki, Gaɗa-Wundu, Fello-Kunduwa.

Erratum. — Sangala et Balaki relèvent de la préfecture de Mali, et Gaɗa-Wundu de Kubiya. Plusieurs minorités ethniques vivent au Fuuta-Jalon. Elles y sont soit enclavées dans le Fuuta central. Par exemple, les Jalonke de Sannoun à 25 km de la ville de Labé, ou bien à Sangareya, dans Pita, etc. Sangala s’éteand à la périphérie Nord du Fuuta, dans Mali. L’article ne localise les Sarakole que dans Mali. En réalité, ils sont éparpillés à travers le Fuuta. Avec leur sens des affaires et leur maîtrise de certains arts et métiers, ils acquirent droit de cité depuis des siècls. Ils sont prospères à Labe-ville, à Leluma dans la sous-préfecture éponyme de Saran.
Les Jakanke sont également présents partout : Labé, Gaoual, Pita, Mali, etc. Vassale des seigneurs Kaliduyaaɓe de la province (Diiwal) du Labé, Touba devint une principauté religieuse et économique prospère. Persécutée par la France, elle déclina et chuta avec le deuxième exil d’Alfa Yaya Diallo en 1910.
Et n’oublions pas les Koniagui, Basari, Badiaranke, et bien sûr les Fulɓe Fulakunda— Tierno S. Bah

61. — Ces minorités ont pu préserver une organisation sociale, un type d’habitat et/ou des stigmates agraires sensiblement différents de ceux généralement attribués aux populations fulɓe . Ainsi, à Badougoula, à l’ouest de la préfecture de Mali, les Sarakole possèdent un système agraire original basé sur une culture des berges de la Bantala avec des tapades réduites et peu productives (B. Ly, 1998) qui les rapprochent du simple jardin de case. De la même façon, on ne peut pas ignorer que certains Fulɓe demeurent de purs éleveurs comme dans les boowe de Gaoual ou de Télimélé, lieux où la tapade est inexistante à l’instar de Wuree-Kaba.

62. — Nombreux sont aussi les villages roundés dont les populations sont spécialisées dans un artisanat (forgerons, potiers, cordonniers,..) et qui constituent autant de groupes intégrés mais non assimilés. Selon la proportion de descendants de captifs, leurs plus ou moins grandes émancipations sociale et économique, les contextes locaux connaissent parfois des spécificités, bien délicates à extrapoler. Pour une meilleure compréhension des systèmes ruraux du Fuuta-Jalon, il convient donc de prendre en considération la composition et l’organisation de la société locale, mais en se gardant bien entendu de tout déterminisme ethnique ou social.

63. — La société du Fuuta-Jalon apparaît finalement comme une mosaïque dont la foulanisation n’est ni systématique ni totale. Plutôt que le “pays des Fulɓe”, il serait plus rigoureux de qualifier cette région comme le pays où l’influence fulɓe est prépondérante.

Seule la méconnaissance ou une compréhension superficielle de quelque 500 ans d’histoire économique, culturelle, politique et linguistique du Fuuta-Jalon peut conduire à une affirmation aussi péremptoire. D’où le découpage numérique des paragraphes du texte, qui entrave la trame de la narration. — Tierno S. Bah

D’importants contrastes de densités humaines
64. — Si l’on en croit le Recensement Général de la Population et de l’Habitat de 1983 (celui de 1996 demeurant en grande partie inutilisable), la Moyenne Guinée enregistre une densité moyenne de 22,5 hab./km2 qui peut sembler relativement modeste.

65. — Mais les chiffres et les impressions qui ont frappé les esprits concernent les hauts plateaux où les densités proposées dépassent 50 hab./km2 pour la quasi-totalité des souspréfectures, avec des maxima dépassant les 120 hab./km2 (fig. 2) pour celles de Dionfo, Daralabé, Noussy (202 hab./km2). Il est vrai que des densités rurales supérieures à 50 habitants/km2 sont peu fréquentes au sein d’une Afrique de l’Ouest où le Fuuta-Jalon apparaît nettement comme un pôle de fortes densités. Cela pourrait conforter l’image d’une éventuelle pression démographique si les densités n’étaient pas spatialement fortement hétérogènes. De nombreuses campagnes du Fuuta-Jalon connaissent en effet des densités bien inférieures, sans commune mesure avec celles des hauts plateaux. La carte des densités montre une organisation en auréoles autour du “noyau” démographique de Labé, selon un gradient décroissant (moins de 15 hab./km2 sur la périphérie).

66. — Afin de mieux cerner les réalités des contextes démographiques, il conviendrait de raisonner en terme de charge de population et de rapporter la population totale à la superficie cultivable. Cela révélerait, par exemple, des charges démographiques importantes dans les régions où les boowe sont très étendus, comme celles de Koubia, Tougué, Doŋel-Sigon ou encore de Télimélé. Or actuellement, les insuffisances quantitative et qualitative des statistiques ne peuvent permettre une telle étude. L’analyse des rapports entre société et espace ne peut ignorer de tels contrastes de densité, qui suggèrent l’existence de contextes et de perspectives hétérogènes voire parfois opposés.

Une influence des contextes géo-économiques et politiques à prendre en considération
67. — La situation géographique, les contextes économiques et politiques peuvent influencer directement ou indirectement les dynamiques rurales et sont autant de facteurs de diversité des campagnes du Fuuta-Jalon.

68. — L’enclavement représente un facteur majeur d’inégalité économique au Fuuta-Jalon. Malgré d’importants efforts, de nombreuses campagnes demeurent mal desservies ou inaccessibles du fait de pistes impraticables durant toute ou une partie de l’année. Certaines campagnes (les boowe de Koubia et Télimélé entre autres) ont une économie empreinte d’autarcie tandis que d’autres (telles Timbo ou Timbi-Madina) grâce au bitume, ou à des pistes de réfection récente, connaissent un dynamisme en partie ou largement lié à des possibilités d’écoulement des produits agricoles.

69. — La proximité d’un centre urbain ou d’un marché hebdomadaire actif correspond aussi à un facteur d’inégalité spatiale. La proximité d’une ville génère des opportunités de vente de produits de l’agriculture ou de l’artisanat, des opportunités d’activités citadines comme le commerce. Des embryons de ceintures maraîchères commencent à se développer dans les villages à la périphérie des villes les plus dynamiques, à l’image de Labé.

70. — L’aire d’action des projets de développement peut aussi jouer un rôle dans la diversité des trajectoires économiques. Il est indéniable que certains projets agricoles, tel que le Projet de Développement Agricole de Timbi-Madina, ont accompagné ou encouragé une modification du système de production de certaines exploitations paysannes et ce faisant du système rural de la campagne concernée.

71. — La proximité de la frontière représente un facteur supplémentaire de différenciation des dynamiques rurales. Les flux transfrontaliers de marchandises ou d’hommes modifient directement ou indirectement la physionomie des systèmes ruraux des espaces frontaliers. De plus, le contexte politique doit être pris en considération. La Première République avait signifié une fuite dans les pays voisins. Aujourd’hui, les drames récents de la Sierra Léone engendrent à l’inverse des flux d’immigrants.

72. — Les facteurs de diversité, tant des contextes que des dynamiques, n’ont pu être qu’effleurés. Mais il se comprend aisément qu’une région estimée à près de 80 000 km2 (G. Diallo et al., 1987), soit une fois et demi le Togo ou trois fois le Burundi, ne puisse être appréhendée de manière monolithique. Non seulement les plateaux centraux ne résument pas le Fuuta-Jalon mais encore faut-il s’efforcer de dépasser les représentations et les idées reçues les plus communes si l’on tient à comprendre les évolutions en cours et à les percevoir de façon plus réaliste.

Les représentations ne sont pas des diagnostics
73. — Les représentations les plus courantes du Fuuta se sont transmises, depuis les années 1930, de génération en génération. Et ce sont ces mêmes représentations qui constituent ou influencent fortement encore les bases des diagnostics élaborés par les « experts », diagnostics qui fondent ensuite les modes d’intervention de nombreux projets de développement, ignorant ainsi certaines nuances ou remises en cause du discours classique traitant du Fuuta-Jalon.

La pression démographique n’est pas généralisée
74. — L’examen des densités brutes de population a montré des contrastes importants. Les lacunes statistiques ne permettent pas toujours de prouver l’existence ou non d’une surpopulation.

75. — Le mythe de la surpopulation trouve davantage sa source dans des observations partielles et finalement des extrapolations d’abord accomplies par des cadres coloniaux. La surpopulation est un concept vieilli qui correspond à une vision étriquée des contextes économiques et géographiques. Depuis quelques décennies déjà, le concept de pression démographique exprime une dynamique plutôt qu’un état (la surpopulation). La pression démographique, souvent mise en avant au Fuuta-Jalon, demeure une notion bien délicate à généraliser tant les situations sont multiples et parfois contradictoires. A Wuree-Kaba, la pression démographique est un problème qui ne se pose pas (encore ?), tandis qu’à Pita il ne se pose plus… Dans le premier cas, la faiblesse du peuplement et la réserve d’espace n’obligent pour l’instant à aucune réduction des temps de jachère, tandis que dans le second cas, ceux-ci sont stabilisés et parfois en progression. Ces types de contre-exemples permettent de renier un discours univoque dans lequel la pression démographique représente une des principales problématiques du développement rural et durable aujourd’hui. Bien entendu, il n’est pas question ici de nier que de nombreuses campagnes dans l’ensemble du Fuuta subissent une relative pression sur les terres cultivables et doivent réduire leurs temps de jachère mais il faut aussi reconnaître que d’autres (Pita) souffrent d’une relative hémorragie de la population active et parfois d’une déprise rurale (Bantiŋel par exemple).

Note. — L’article mentionne seulement Wuree-Kaba et Pita/Bantiŋel. L’enquête de terrain aurait dû couvrir plusieurs sous-préfectures du Fuuta-Jalon, au lieu de se limiter à ces trois localités. De plus, en l’absence de données statistiques et de témoignages valides, les affirmations ci-dessus restent des opinions personnelles affaiblies par l’usage des mots subjectifs et des jugements de valeur suivants  : mythe, extrapolation, observations partielles, vieilli, étriqué. Avis catégoriques et tranchants des auteurs sur leurs devanciers dans la discipline ! — Tierno S. Bah

76. — En finir avec la tentation généralisatrice consiste à opérer une révolution copernicienne, en tenant le plus possible à l’écart les représentations courantes qui engendrent irrémédiablement un point aveugle puisqu’elles n’autorisent pas tous les questionnements.

Quel bilan pour l’environnement ?
77. — L’hypothèse d’un environnement menacé, déchu même, reposait sur un scénario associant pratiques culturales traditionnelles prédatrices et pression démographique exagérée. Les conséquences annoncées et souvent décrites comme avérées – elles hantent les représentations courantes du Fuuta étaient et sont toutes plus catastrophistes les unes que les autres : disparition du couvert arboré, réduction des temps de jachère, érosion incontrôlée, stérilisation des terres, jusqu’au pronostic d’une désertification…

78 — S’il est vrai que la pluviométrie annuelle diminue assez significati-vement depuis 1970, cela n’est point une spécificité fuutanienne, mais suit une tendance globale qui concerne l’ensemble de l ‘Afrique de l’Ouest. Enfin, une région qui reçoit entre 1400 et 1900 mm d’eau en moyenne, semble difficilement, même à moyen terme, menacée de désertification.

79. — De plus un certain nombre de principes et de mécanismes, considérés comme acquis et responsables d’une dégradation du milieu semblent loin d’être aussi effectifs que l’on veut bien le laisser croire. La campagne de Pita est sur ce point des plus représentatives. Localisée en un des lieux réputés les plus en danger du Fuuta, elle combine un certain dépeuplement à des temps de jachère en stagnation ou même en augmentation. Quant à Wuree-Kaba, s’il existe certes des défrichements, la disponibilité en terre autorise des rotations permettant une reconstitution correcte du couvert arboré.

80. — Mais plus étonnant encore est de ne pas trouver vraiment trace et reconnaissance (à l’exception de quelques travaux comme ceux de J. Vogel et C. Lauga-Sallenave) de la remarquable capacité des paysans à construire ou reconstruire leur environnement. Si l’on reconnaît que les haies vives des tapades sont de belle facture, il n’est jamais mentionné que ces mêmes haies totalement anthropiques sont d’une grande diversité botanique, contribuant à assurer une certaine biodiversité (Lauga-Sallenave, 1997). Elles gardent en revanche leur image d’élément du « paysage traditionnel fulɓe », grandes consommatrices de bois. De plus, si les premiers administrateurs coloniaux s’extasiaient déjà sur l’espace de production intensif que constitue cette même tapade, en terme d’environnement ou de gestion des ressources, on a tendance à oblitérer le fait que leurs sols, capables de hauts rendements, sont de véritables anthroposols (Vogel, 1993).

Pionniers ou successeurs, les fonctionnaires coloniaux français ne furent pas les seuls à apprécier le couplage de l’élevage et de l’agriculture (jardins ménagers —cuntuuji— et champs extérieurs — gese). Dans Serfs, Peasants, and Socialists: A former Serf Village in the Republic of Guinea (1968), le sociologue américain Derman en donne une description minutieuse et généralement positive. — Tierno S. Bah

81. — Quant à l’origine des boowe liée à la destruction de la mythique forêt dense et plus globalement à une déforestation ancienne et intense, elle n’a jamais été réellement démontrée. Certains auteurs (Rossi, 1998 ; André, 2002) proposent même une lecture et une analyse fort différentes du paysage à partir de son évolution morphopédologique et aboutissent à une tout autre conclusion : les boowe existaient tels quels à l’arrivée des Fulɓe et furent utilisés au mieux de leurs potentialités par les pasteurs qui les estimaient uniquement aptes à la pâture.

82. — Ainsi, aurait-on seulement voulu garder et transmettre l’image de paysans dévoreurs d’espaces forestiers, vampirisant la fertilité de sols pourtant souvent très pauvres à l’origine et menaçant la durabilité de leurs ressources ?… quand ils sont tout autant de remarquables bâtisseurs de haies, de vergers et de sols particulièrement fertiles. Là encore, se dégager des représentations, à la fois héritées mais aussi intégrées aux nouveaux soucis écologiques, devient une nécessité pour s’autoriser à mieux comprendre la gestion des ressources par la population.

Quelques mutations des systèmes ruraux à ne plus oblitérer
83. — Les représentations, aussi inévitables soient-elles, engagent trop souvent à ne suivre que des perspectives balisées. Leurs influences occultent encore fortement l’identification de mutations actuelles et fondamentales au sein des campagnes du Fuuta-Jalon. Parmi ces transformations, qui s’inscrivent dans les temps longs et les temps courts, la baisse de la prépondérance de l’agriculture dans de nombreux systèmes ruraux n’est pas des moindres. En effet, le bétail, par exemple, s’est largement raréfié dans les hauts plateaux, sans perdre totalement toutefois son rôle social, au point que l’image du pasteur Pullo appartient davantage à l’histoire qu’à l’actualité. En ce sens, l’exemple de Wuree-Kaba où le bétail est encore au centre du système agraire, indique concrètement que certaines campagnes du Fuuta-Jalon connaissent une évolution pour le moment bien étrangère à celle de ces hauts plateaux, d’où la nécessité de ne pas accoler trop vite des dynamiques constatées localement à un ensemble régional.

84. — L’exode rural, le développement des cultures commerciales dans les bas-fonds, la recomposition des rapports sociaux hommes/femmes et ex-maîtres/descendants de captifs sont quelques exemples de profondes mutations, de plus en plus prégnantes mais non systématiques, au sein des exploitations, des villages et des campagnes (V. André et G. Pestaña 1998a, 1998b). Ces mutations économiques, sociales et spatiales sont généralement minorées puisqu’elles n’entrent pas dans les schémas de pensée pré-établis et encore dominants.

85. — Les représentations les plus courantes ont progressivement élaboré un seul modèle pour la dynamique du milieu et des sociétés du Fuuta-Jalon, ainsi que pour les liens qu’ils entretiennent. A ce titre les problèmes de gestion de l’espace et de l’environnement sont considérés comme uniformes. Certes des éléments d’unité, et peut-être d’identité géographique, sont indéniables. Pourtant une analyse qui ne considère pas comme admis ce modèle et tente d’en vérifier la pertinence révèle que la région offre plusieurs visages. Les deux campagnes prises à titre d’illustration donnent une idée des contrastes spatiaux, socio-économiques et environnementaux que l’on rencontre, et illustrent le caractère stéréotypé de ces représentations encore dominantes.

86. — C’est la persistance des idées reçues, des simplifications et des généralisations hâtives, et parfois, la transcription locale de dogmes planétaires qui engendrent l’incompréhension des sociétés rurales, de leurs stratégies, de leurs capacités… et de leurs véritables problèmes. Le décalage entre ces représentations figées, ces postulats trompeurs peu ou pas remis en cause, et la réalité, est à l’origine d’une longue litanie d’échecs ou de demi-succès des opérations de développement. Si la connaissance des campagnes du Fuuta-Jalon doit encore progresser afin de nuancer des schémas trompeurs, cette nouvelle vision doit surtout être intégrée par des opérateurs dont les logiques internes et les modes opératoires s’accommodent mal de la diversité et de la nuance.

Bibliographie
André Véronique, 2002 – Environnement dégradé au territaire gére : le Fouta Djalon (République de Guinée). Bordeaux, 512 p (Doctorat de Géographie).
André Véronique et Pestaña Gilles, 1998a – Un écosystème au coeur des contradictions du développement : les bas-fonds du Fouta Djalon (Guinée). In : Table ronde « Dynamiques sociales et environnement, pour un dialogue entre chercheurs, opérateurs et bailleurs de fonds ». Bordeaux, 9-10-11 septembre 1998, 9 p.
André Véronique, Pestaña Gilles et Rossi Georges, 1998b – Agropastoralisme et dégradation du milieu, fantasmes et réalités : l’exemple d’une moyenne montagne tropicale, le Fouta-Djalon
(République de Guinée). In : Table ronde : BART François, Morin Serge et Salomon Jean-Noël, dirs. – Les montagnes tropicales : identités, mutations, développemen.t Bordeaux-Talence 27-28
novembre 1998, Pessac, Dymset-CRET, 2001, pp. 205-218.
André Yves, 1998 – Enseigner les représentations spatiales. Paris, Anthropos-Economica, 254 p.
Beck Monica, 1990 – Exode rural et systèmes de production : cas de la sous-préfecture de Timbi-Madina (Fouta-Djallon). Gembloux, Faculté des Sciences agronomiques, 106 p. + annexes (travail de fin d’étude d’ingénieur agronome).
Boserup Ester, 1970 – Evolution agraire et pression démographique. Paris, Flammarion, 221 p.
Botte Roger, 1994 – “Stigmates sociaux et discriminations religieuses : l’ancienne classe servile au Fuuta-Jaloo”. Cahiers d’Etudes Africaines, XXXIV (1-3), pp. 109-136.
Boulet Jean et Talineau Jean-Claude, 1988 – Eléments de l’occupation du milieu rural et systèmes de production agricole au Fouta Djalon (République de Guinée) : tentative de diagnostic d’évolution. ORSTOM, Cahiers des Sciences Humaines, 24 (1), pp. 99-117.
Couty Philippe, 1998 – Voir et comprendre le changement dans les sociétés africaines. Un point de vue d’économiste. Stateco, n° 56 pp. 5-25.
Detraux Micheline, 1991 – Approche intégrée des systèmes de production et de leur dynamique, un outil pour une politique agricole adaptée aux besoins des régions. Application au Fouta-Djallon (République de Guinée Conakry). Gembloux, Faculté des Sciences agronomiques, 404 p. + annexes (Doctorat de sciences agronomiques).
  Detraux Micheline, 1992 – Rapport de Mission. Restauration et aménagement du bassin représentatif pilote de Guétoya (Bantignel). MARA, PNUD, FAO, 65 p.
Diallo, I. Kegneko, 1989 – Historique et évoluton de la foresterie guinéenne. Annexe 3 du rapport de consultation nationale. Conakry, F.A.O., 107 p.
Djigo Seybatou A., 1988 – Reforestation, protection et aménagement de quatre bassins versants (Kokoulo, Fétoré, Doubi et Téné) et aména-gement du Bassin Représentatif Pilote de Guetoya (Bantignel). Conakry (Guinée), F.A.O., Rapport de mission, 112 p.
F.A.O, Rome, 1992 – Avant-Projet du Schéma Directeur d’Aménagement et de Gestion du BRP de Guetoya. Volume 1. Projet GUI/86/012 Restauration et aménagement du bassin représentatif pilote de Guetoya (Bantignel). MARA, PNUD, FAO, 137 p.
F.A.O, Rome, 1994 – Restauration et aménagement du bassin versant représentatif pilote de Guetoya (Bantignel). Conclusions et recommandations du projet. Rome, PNUD, FAO, 49 p.
Garreau Jean-Marc, 1993 – Approche des systèmes de production dans la région de Timbi-Madina (République de Guinée). Montpellier, Cnearc, 94 p. + annexes (mémoire de fin d’étude).
Hasson Bruno, 1988 – L’agriculture guinéenne. Afrique Agriculture, n°151, pp. 10-19.
Jouve Ph. et Tallec M., 1994 – Une méthode d’étude des systèmes agraires en Afrique de l’Ouest par l’analyse de la diversité et la dynamique des agro-systèmes villageois. In : Actes du Symposium Recherches-Système en agriculture et développement rural. Montpellier, Cirad, pp. 185-192.
Langdale-Brown I., 1962 – Rapport de la mission CCTA/FAMA sur les hauts plateaux du Fouta-Djallon (Guinée) 1961-1962, Volume I, Ecologie : utilisation et conservation des terres. Lagos, CCTA/FAMA, 1962, 43 p.
Lauga-Sallenave Carole, 1997 – Le cercle des haies. Paysages des agroéleveurs Fulɓe du Fouta-Djalon (Plaine des Timbis, Guinée). Paris, Université de Paris X-Nanterre, 423 p. (Doctorat de Géographie).
Ly Boun-Tieng, 1998 – Diagnostic des systèmes agraires du bassin versant de Koundou et ses environs. Données agro-socio-économiques de base. Labé, Projet de gestion des ressources naturelles, USAID Guinée, Winrock International, 112 p.
M.A.R.A et Union Européenne, 1995 – Actes du séminaire international sur le programme régional d’aménagement des bassins versants du Haut Niger et de la Haute Gambie. Conakry, 20-25 mai 1995, 120 p. + annexes.
O.U.A., 1981 – Aménagement intégré du massif du Fouta Djallon. Projet Régional Afrique PAF/81/060. 128 p. + annexes.
Pelissier Paul, 1978 – Le paysan et le technicien : quelques aspects d’un difficile face à face. In : Actes du colloque de Ouagadougou 4-8 décembre 1978, « Maîtrise de l’espace agraire et développement en Afrique tropicale. Logique paysanne et rationalité technique », Paris, ORSTOM pp. 1-8. (Mémoires ORSTOM, n° 89)
Perreira-Barreto S. et Van Es F.W.J., 1962 – Rapport de la mission CCTA/FAMA sur les hauts plateaux du Fouta Djallon (Guinée), 1961-1962, Volume II, Pédologie. Lagos, CCTA/FAMA, 101 p.
Pouquet Jean, 1956 – Aspects morphologiques du Fouta Dialon (régions de Kindia et de Labé, Guinée française, AOF). Caractères alarmants des phénomènes d’érosion des sols déclenchés par les activités humaines. Revue de Géographie Alpine, Grenoble, pp. 233-245.
Pouquet Jean, 1956 – Le plateau du Labé (Guinée française, A.O.F.). Remarques sur le caractère dramatique des phénomènes d’érosion des sols et sur les remèdes proposés. Bulletin de l’IFAN, Dakar, Tome XVIII, série A, n°1, p.1-16.
Racine Jean (sous la dir.), 1988 – La dynamique des systèmes ruraux : les enjeux de la diversification. Une approche des tiers-mondes. Talence : CEGET, Projet de recherche 1988-1991, Atelier rural du CEGET, 25 p.
Richard-Mollard Jacques, 1942 – Les traits d’ensemble du Fouta-Djallon. Revue de Géographie Alpine, Grenoble, XXXI (2), pp. 199-213.
Richard-Mollard Jacques, 1944 – Essai sur la vie paysanne au Fouta-Djallon : le cadre physique, l’économie rurale, l’habitat. Revue de Géographie Alpine Grenoble, XXXII (2), pp. 135-239.
Roca Pierre-Jean, 1987 – Différentes approches des systèmes agraires. In : Terres, comptoirs, silos : des systèmes de production aux politiques alimentaires. Paris, ORSTOM, pp. 75-94 (Coll. Colloques et Séminaires).
Roquebain Charles, 1937 – A travers le Fouta Djallon. Revue de Géographie Alpine, Grenoble, XXV (1), pp. 545-581.
Rossi Georges, 1998 – Une relecture de l’érosion tropicale. Annales de Géographie, Paris, n°101, pp. 318-329.
Sudres A., 1947 – La dégradation des sols au Foutah Djalon. L’agronomie tropicale, Paris, volume II, n° 5-6, pp. 227-246.
Suret-Canale, Jean
1970 – La République de Guinée, Paris, Editions sociales, 432 p.
1969 – Les origines ethniques des anciens captifs au Fouta-Djalon. Notes Africaines, Dakar, 123, pp. 91-92.
Vieillard Gilbert, 1940 – Notes sur les Peuls du Fouta-Djallon. Bulletin de l’IFAN, Dakar, tome II, n°1-2, p. 83-210
Vissac B. et Hentgen A., 1980 – Eléments pour une problématique de recherche sur les systèmes agraires et le développement. Paris, INRA (S.A.D.).
Vogel Jean
1990 – Etude sur l’amélioration des sols à fonio des plaines de Timbis. Pita, Projet de développement agricole de Timbi-Madina, 53 p. + annexes.
1993 – Des paysans qui connaissent leur affaire. Lettre du réseau Recherche- Développement, 17 février, 2 p.

Notes
1.- Andre V., 2002 et Pestaña G. (thèse en cours de réalisation).
2.- «La forêt sèche couvrait autrefois l’ensemble du Fouta Djalon, mais elle a été presque complètement détruite par les incendies et par le pâturage, à l’exception de quelques petites superficies près de la Guinée-Bissau et du Sénégal.» B. Hasson, 1998, p.18.
3.- « Plus particulièrement on note : une forte densité de population dans le Fouta-Djallon, parfois jusqu’à 140 hab./km2; la pression foncière qui en résulte et la conséquente réduction du temps de jachère qui est à l’origine de l’appauvrissement des sols ; l’extension des terres cultivées, au détriment des surfaces forestières et pastorales. ». F.A.O., 1992, pp.7-8.
4.- « La forêt dense sèche ou ce qu’il en reste ne présente plus qu’une mosaïque de reliques dispersées. […]elle a subi une très forte pression et de ce fait elle est menacée d’une disparition rapide. » F.A.O., 1992, p. 29.
5.- « Incontestablement les feux de brousse supportent, à l’heure actuelle, la majeure part des responsabilités. La dénudation des pentes, aussi faibles soient-elles, laisse le sol nu, exposé aux averses. Le pâturage excessif ne permet pas la reconstitution d’une végétation qui s’appauvrit en quantité et en qualité. Les sentiers suivis par les troupeaux préparent les chemins que l’eau empruntera ; le pullulement des chèvres (l’autre grand ennemi des sols) est à l’origine de la mutilation des jeunes pousses… enfin, le surpeuplement humain exacerbe tous ces facteurs destructifs dont la virulence ne connaît plus de limites. » J. Pouquet, 1956, p.9.
6.- « En résumé, le massif du Fouta – Djalon, véritable château d’eau de la sous-région de l’Afrique de l’Ouest est, du fait de sa charge démographique et des pressions d’origines diverses sur un milieu naturel fragile, menacé par un processus de désertification… ». O.U.A., 1981, p.4.
7.- « Le grignotage des terres s’accuse de jour en jour.[…] Les bowals, stricto sensu, progressent vertigineusement ». J. Pouquet, 1956, p.244.
8.- « D’une manière générale, les systèmes (sous-systèmes) de culture et d’élevage sont assez similaires d’une région à l’autre du Fouta – Djalon.». Detraux M., 1992, pp. 23.
9.- Pour simplifier le propos, le terme de campagne sera préféré à celui de “souspréfecture” trop peu géographique, à celui “d’espace rural” trop vague, enfin à celui de “pays” à la signification précise et adaptée mais malheureusement trop peu usité pour être parlant.
10.- NDantari : sol ferrallitique limoneux ou sablo-limoneux, ocre ou beige, très lessivé, perméable et battant, très acide, localisé sur les faibles pentes et les surfaces subordonnants, chimiquement pauvre.
Hollaande : souvent associé au dantari, il se rencontre dans de légères dépressions (teinte grise) ; sol colluvial, limoneux ou argilo-limoneux, peu structuré et à hydromorphie temporaire, extrêmement acide.
11.- HansaNHere : sol caillouteux composé de matériaux hétérogènes résultant de l’altération de roches dures et du démantèlement des cuirasses. Localisé sur des versants à forte pente ( plus de 12%), ce sol ferrallitique rouge, souvent épais, meuble, bien structuré et filtrant offre une certaine fertilité chimique.
12.- « Du point de vue de l’altitude on peut le diviser en deux parties : les hauts plateaux, une région de plus de 10 000 km2 se trouvant pour la plupart au-dessus de 800 m, et comprenant les villes de Dalaba, Pita, Labé et Mali ; la région environnante se trouvant pour la plupart au-dessous de 800 m. ». I. Langdale-Brown, 1961-1962.