In Memoriam D. W. Arnott (1915-2004)

D.W. Arnott. The Nominal and Verbal Systems of Fula
D.W. Arnott. The Nominal and Verbal Systems of Fula

This article creates the webAfriqa homage and tribute to the memory of Professor David W. Arnott (1915-2004), foremost linguist, researcher, teacher and publisher on Pular/Fulfulde, the language of the Fulbe/Halpular of West and Central Africa. It is reproduces the obituary written in 2004 par Philip J. Jaggar. David Arnott belonged in the category of colonial administrators who managed to balance their official duties with in-depth social and cultural investigation of the societies their countries ruled. I publish quite a log of them throughout the webAfriqa Portal: Vieillard, Dieterlen, Delafosse, Person, Francis-Lacroix, Germain, etc.
The plan is to contributed to disseminate as much as possible the intellectual legacy of Arnott’s. Therefore, the links below are just part of the initial batch :

Tierno S. Bah


D. W. Arnott was a distinguished scholar and teacher of West African languages, principally Fulani (also known as Fula, Fulfulde and Pulaar) and Tiv, David Whitehorn Arnott, Africanist: born London 23 June 1915; Lecturer, then Reader, Africa Department, School of Oriental and African Studies 1951-66, Professor of West African Languages 1966-77 (Emeritus); married 1942 Kathleen Coulson (two daughters); died Bedale, North Yorkshire 10 March 2004.

He was one of the last members of a generation of internationally renowned British Africanists/linguists whose early and formative experience of Africa, with its immense and complex variety of peoples and languages, derived from the late colonial era.

Born in London in 1915, the elder son of a Scottish father, Robert, and mother, Nora, David Whitehorn Arnott was educated at Sheringham House School and St Paul’s School in London, before going on to Pembroke College, Cambridge, where he read Classics and won a “half-blue” for water polo. He received his PhD from London University in 1961, writing his dissertation on “The Tense System in Gombe Fula”.

Following graduation in 1939 Arnott joined the Colonial Administrative Service as a district officer in northern Nigeria, where he was posted to Bauchi, Benue and Zaria Provinces, often touring rural areas on a horse or by push bike. His (classical) language background helped him to learn some of the major languages in the area — Fulani, Tiv, and Hausa — and the first two in particular were to become his languages of published scientific investigation.

It was on board ship in a wartime convoy to Cape Town that Arnott met his wife-to-be, Kathleen Coulson, who was at the time a Methodist missionary in Ibadan, Nigeria. They married in Ibadan in 1942, and Kathleen became his constant companion on most of his subsequent postings in Benue and Zaria provinces, together with their two small daughters, Margaret and Rosemary.

From 1951 to 1977, David Arnott was a member of the Africa Department at the School of Oriental and African Studies (Soas), London University, as Lecturer, then Reader, and was appointed Professor of West African Languages in 1966. He spent 1955-56 on research leave in West Africa, conducting a detailed linguistic survey of the many diverse dialects of Fulani, travelling from Nigeria across the southern Saharan edges of Niger, Dahomey (now Benin), Upper Volta, French Sudan (Burkina Faso and Mali), and eventually to Senegal, Gambia, and Guinea. Many of his research notes from this period are deposited in the Soas library (along with other notes, documents and teaching materials relating mainly to Tiv and Hausa poetry and songs).

He was Visiting Professor at University College, Ibadan (1961) and the University of California, Los Angeles (1963), and attended various African language and Unesco congresses in Africa, Europe, and the United States. Between 1970 and 1972 he made a number of visits to Kano, Nigeria, to teach at Abdullahi Bayero College (now Bayero University, Kano), where he also supervised (as Acting Director) the setting up of the Centre for the Study of Nigerian Languages, and I remember a mutual colleague once expressing genuine astonishment that “David never seemed to have made any real enemies”. This was a measure of his integrity, patience and even-handed professionalism, and the high regard in which he was held.

Arnott established his international reputation with his research on Fula(ni), a widely used language of the massive Niger-Congo family which is spoken (as a first language) by an estimated eight million people scattered throughout much of West and Central Africa, from Mauritania and Senegal to Niger, Nigeria, Cameroon, Central African Republic and Chad (as well as the Sudan), many of them nomadic cattle herders.

Between 1956 and 1998 he produced almost 30 (mainly linguistic) publications on Fulani and in 1970 published his magnum opus, The Nominal and Verbal Systems of Fula (an expansion of his PhD dissertation), supplementing earlier works by his predecessors, the leading British and German scholars F.W. Taylor and August Klingenheben. In this major study of the Gombe (north-east Nigeria) dialect, he described, in clear and succinct terms, the complex system of 20 or more so-called “noun classes” (a classificatory system widespread throughout the Niger-Congo family which marks singular/plural pairs, often distinguishing humans, animals, plants, mass nouns and liquids). The book also advanced our understanding of the (verbal) tense- aspect and conjugational system of Fulani. His published research encompassed, too, Fulani literature and music.

In addition to Fulani, Arnott also worked on Tiv, another Niger-Congo language mainly spoken in east/central Nigeria, and from the late 1950s onwards he wrote more than 10 articles, including several innovative treatments of Tiv tone and verbal conjugations, in addition to a paper comparing the noun-class systems of Fulani and Tiv (“Some Reflections on the Content of Individual Classes in Fula and Tiv”, La Classification Nominale dans les Langues Négro-Africaines, 1967). Some of his carefully transcribed Tiv data and insightful analyses were subsequently used by theoretical linguists following the generative (“autosegmental”) approach to sound systems. (His colleague at Soas the renowned Africanist R.C. Abraham had already published grammars and a dictionary of Tiv in the 1930s and 1940s.)

In addition to Fulani and Tiv, Arnott taught undergraduate Hausa-language classes at Soas for many years, together with F.W. (“Freddie”) Parsons, the pre-eminent Hausa scholar of his era, and Jack Carnochan and Courtenay Gidley. He also pioneered the academic study of Hausa poetry at Soas, publishing several articles on the subject, and encouraged the establishment of an academic pathway in African oral literature.

The early 1960s were a time when the available language-teaching materials were relatively sparse (we had basically to make do with cyclostyled handouts), but he overcame these resource problems by organising class lessons with great care and attention, displaying a welcome ability to synthesise and explain language facts and patterns in a simple and coherent manner. He supervised a number of PhD dissertations on West African languages (and literature), including the first linguistic study of the Hausa language written by a native Hausa speaker, M.K.M. Galadanci (1969). He was genuinely liked and admired by his students.

David Arnott was a quiet man of deep faith who was devoted to his family. Following his retirement he and Kathleen moved to Moffat in Dumfriesshire (his father had been born in the county). In 1992 they moved again, to Bedale in North Yorkshire (where he joined the local church and golf club), in order to be nearer to their two daughters, and grandchildren.

Philip J. Jaggar
The Independent

Les visages du Fuuta-Jalon. Des campagnes en mutation

Case (suudu) et jardin menager (suntuure) au Fuuta-Jalon
Case (suudu) et jardin (suntuure) au Fuuta-Jalon

Fondée en 1948, la revue scientifique Cahiers d’Outre-mer a survécu aux changements de la vague des indépendances des années 1960, qui  entraînèrent la disparition de plusieurs publications coloniales. On trouvera ici le premier d’une série d’articles sur la Guinée, publié dans les Cahiers.
Métholodologie oblige, peut-être, mais le document se concentre sur l’espace, la géographie et l’environnement. Ce faisant, il escamote l’histoire et effleure seulement la société pluri-ethnique du pays. Ainsi, l’article commence par une vague référence à l’ouverture de la Guinée en 1984. Il indique certes que “la recherche en sciences humaines accuse un retard préjudiciable depuis la Première République”. Mais il ne dit rien sur le type de fermeture du pays avant le coup d’Etat militaire du 3 avril. Et il reste silencieux sur les conséquences de ce changement important. C’est dommage, car en intégrant mieux les divers aspects de l’évolution du Fuuta-Jalon, les auteurs auraient pu mener une étude plus riche. Un passage laconique et atypique d’un papier scientifique se lit au point 58.  Q’entendent les auteurs par la formule prescriptive et autoritaire: « Il faut bannir l’idée d’Un terroir fuutanien… » !!!
Cela dit, au lieu de la transcription francisée de l’original (imprimé et électronique et à l’exception de la Bibliographie et des Notes), la présente édition se conforme à l’Alphabet standard du Pular-Fulfulde. Ce système reflète mieux la sémantique de la langue, et est plus fidèle à ses nuances, s’agissant,  par exemple, des noms de lieux et de personnes, des vocables désignant l’ethnie, la langue, etc.)  Ainsi on lira : aynde (sing.)/ayɗe (plur.), boowal (sing.)/boowe (plur.), diiwal, maccuɓe, Pullo, Fulɓe, Pular, Fuuta-Jalon, Doŋel, Bantiŋel, Wuree-Kaba, etc. au lieu de : aïndés, bowés, diwal, Peul/Peuls, Fouta-Djalon, Donguel,  Bantignel, Ouré-Kaba, etc.
Enfin, cette version inclut des hyperliens absents dans le texte d’origine, accessible sur Revues.org
Tierno S. Bah


Véronique André et Gilles Pestaña
“Les visages du Fouta-Djalon. Des campagnes en mutation : des représentations au terrain.”
Les Cahiers d’Outre-Mer. Revue de géographie de Bordeaux, no. 217, 2002. p. 63-88

Résumé
Le Fuuta-Jalon (République de Guinée) dispose d’une image forte digne d’une image d’Epinal. Il est le “château d’eau de l’Afrique de l’Ouest” dégradé et menacé par des pratiques agropastorales prédatrices. Nous identifierons et caractériserons tout d’abord les représentations usuelles qui le fondent ce discours “officiel”. Puis l’analyse de deux campagnes du Fuuta-Jalon nous permettra de nuancer cette image et d’en montrer les limites, en tant qu’état de référence. Enfin nous dégagerons les dynamiques sociales et environnementales actuelles qui animent le Fuuta-Jalon et engagent à reconsidérer les fondements mêmes de ses représentations.

Abstract
“The Different Faces of Fuuta-Jalon, Republic of Guinea and the changing Countrysides : Representations Observed in the Field.” Fuuta-Jalon, in the Republic of Guinea, presents a picture worthy of a picture of Epinal. It is the “water tower of western Africa”, deteriorated and threatened by predatory agro-pastoral practices. We first identify and characterize the customary representations which render this discourse “official”. Next, the analyses of two countrysides in the Fuuta-Jalon area enables us to refine this picture and show the limits of it, as regards its use as a reference base. Finally, we describe the present social and environmental dynamics which prevail in Fuuta-Jalon and endeavor to reconsider the very foundations of its representations.

Plan

Les représentations : uniformité des campagnes et dégradation de l’environnement

Quelques enseignements du terrain

1. — Lorsque la Guinée s’ouvre en 1984, les opérations de développement se multiplient au Fuuta-Jalon. Elles donnent lieu à toute une série de rapports d’experts et de diagnostics de nature très hétérogène, menés dans un cloisonnement relatif et largement fondés sur des analyses anciennes, alors même que la recherche en sciences humaines accuse un retard préjudiciable depuis la Première République. Cette littérature “grise” fatalement ciblée et répondant à des objectifs d’opérationalité forts distincts de ceux de la recherche, a fini par forger et conforter une certaine représentation géographique du Fuuta-Jalon touchant aux relations entre la société fulɓe et le milieu qu’elle exploite. Elle a abouti à la construction d’un scénario catastrophe reposant sur l’idée que des pratiques paysannes extensives seraient, dans un contexte de pression démographique, une menace pour l’environnement du Fuuta-Jalon, menace suffisante pour mettre en péril le « château d’eau de l’Afrique de l’Ouest ». Or, des recherches récentes sur le terrain1 ont ouvert un certain nombre de réflexions sur la nature et la validité de ces représentations. Entre la vision stéréotypée et monolithique du FuUta-Jalon telle qu’elle apparaît dans les descriptions classiques et la dynamique actuelle des campagnes, il existe en effet un net décalage, dont il s’agit de comprendre les raisons.

Les représentations : uniformité des campagnes et dégradation de l’environnement
2. — Une représentation d’un lieu, d’un phénomène ou d’un groupe humain est par essence subjective. Identifier et caractériser les grands thèmes des représentations usuelles et donc du discours officiel sur le Fuuta-Jalon permettra par la suite d’en montrer les limites.

Le Fuuta-Jalon : une délimitation délicate mais une image forte
3. — La représentation la plus courante considère le Fuuta-Jalon comme une région homogène et l’assimile aux seuls hauts plateaux. C’est à la fois “le château d’eau de l’Afrique de l’Ouest” avec ses plateaux échancrés de vallées, le pays des Fulɓe et de leurs boeufs, le lieu de construction d’un Etat structuré pré-colonial, un espace de fortes densités rurales, une terre baignée d’Islam, etc. Autrement dit, le Fuuta-Jalon serait simultanément une région naturelle, historique, agricole, démographique… en somme une région homogène, une “vraie” région. Cette perception est confortée par le fait que la région dispose d’une dénomination propre, “Fuuta-Jalon”, contrairement aux autres régions du pays pourtant proclamées “naturelles” elles aussi : Guinée Maritime, Haute Guinée et Guinée Forestière.

4. — Il n’est pas innocent de la part des pouvoirs coloniaux, puis de la Première République d’avoir rebaptisé “Moyenne Guinée” ce qui correspondrait au Fuuta-Jalon. Manifestement, pour le pouvoir politique, “le” Fuuta-Jalon passait pour une région suffisamment homogène des points de vue géographique, historique, ethnique, religieux, voire économique pour détenir une identité susceptible de menacer à terme l’unité de la colonie puis de la nation guinéenne. L’appellation plus neutre de “Moyenne Guinée” permettait de gommer en partie cette représentation identitaire.

5. — Cependant, rebaptiser ou redécouper un espace ne suffit pas à en modifier rapidement ses représentations géographiques. En fait, personne ne songe à imaginer que le Fuuta-Jalon n’est pas une région, même si tout le monde est bien en peine d’en tracer les limites. Cet espace recouvre t-il une réalité historique, géologique, ethnique ou simplement administrative? La façon la plus simple d’éluder la question est d’assimiler le Fuuta-Jalon à la région administrative et soi-disant “naturelle” de Moyenne Guinée.

Quelques postulats trompeurs
6. — S’il est évident que nulle délimitation géographique du Fuuta-Jalon ne fait l’unanimité, son assimilation aux seuls hauts plateaux pose également problème. Or s’est imposée une image d’un Fuuta homogène pouvant se résumer aux caractéristiques de ces hauts plateaux ou plateaux centraux.

Les plateaux centraux, expression géographique du “vrai Fuuta”
7. — Etendus du Nord au Sud, de Mali à Dalaba, les hauts plateaux entaillés par un chevelu hydrographique dense culminent entre 1 000 et 1 500 m. Consacré “pays des eaux vives” (proverbe Pular cité par Gilbert Vieillard, 1940), le Fuuta-Jalon est le domaine d’une savane arborée installée sur des sols minces et médiocres alternant avec une maigre prairie sur boowal. Subsistent ça et là sur les versants des fragments de forêt mésophile 2, reliques supposées d’une grande forêt dense qui aurait hélas aujourd’hui disparu, si l’on en croit une légende tenace partagée par les divers intervenants depuis la période coloniale.

8. — La plupart du temps la littérature grise se borne à la description de cette ossature principale et structurante, considérée comme le coeur du Fuuta et assimilée in fine à la totalité de la région. Une image d’un milieu fuutanien stéréotypé est ainsi née montrant des paysages très anthropisés où alternent espaces tabulaires presque dénudés comme les Timbis, collines aux versants largement déboisés, et parcelles mises en culture. La physionomie des hauts plateaux, devenue l’étendard du Fuuta-Jalon, serait représentative de l’ensemble du Fuuta-Jalon et constituerait le “vrai Fouta”.

Le pays des Fulɓe et des fortes densités
9. — Un autre raccourci répandu consiste à considérer le Fuuta-Jalon comme un espace strictement « fulɓe » et en proie au surpeuplement.

10. — Au XVIIIe siècle, la fondation du royaume théocratique du Fuuta-Jalon asseoit une domination politique de l’ethnie fulɓe et instaure un système social et économique fondé sur la distinction hommes libres-esclaves. Les esclaves proviennent de razzias, d’achats ou, plus rarement semble-t-il, des populations animistes asservies sur place et appartenant à des ethnies différentes (Suret-Canale 1969 ; Botte, 1994). Une société rurale très structurée et marquée par un contrôle social de l’espace s’est alors mise en place. Les maîtres, se consacrant exclusivement à la lecture du Coran, à leurs boeufs et à la guerre, s’installent sur les doŋe (sing. doŋol), hauteurs peu fertiles des terroirs, laissant les zones basses (ayɗe, sing. aynde) plus fertiles mais insalubres, à leurs captifs (maccuɓe), chargés de les servir et de les nourrir. Sous la colonisation et la Première République, la captivité disparaît peu à peu, les maîtres se font agriculteurs et les différences de modes de vie s’estompent. Avec le temps, la mosaïque ethnique s’est brouillée à la faveur d’une assimilation réelle ou décrétée au point de considérer le Fuuta comme “le pays des Peuls” (Detraux, 1991, p.69).

Erratum. Il est simpliste et erroné de réduire la société du Fuuta-Jalon théocratique (1725-1897) à la dichotomie “libres-esclaves”. En fait, la stratification sociale comportait cinq niveaux, de la base au sommet : (a) la couche servile ou huuwooɓe/maccuɓe, (b) les castes ou nyeeynuɓe : forgerons, coordonniers, boisseliers, potiers, etc. (c) les allogènes ou tuŋarankooɓe (Sarakole, Jakanke), (d) les hommes libres et non dirigeants ou rimɓe, (a) la couche dirigeante ou lamɓe avec son allié le clergé ou seeremɓe.
Par ailleurs, il est ridicule d’affirmer que “la captivité disparaît peu à peu” sous la colonisation (1898-1958) et ce que les auteurs appellent de façon euphémique la Première république (1958-1984). En réalité, la France coloniale substitua sa rude hégémonie au sytème de servilité domestique. Elle pratiqua l’esclavage à grande échelle avec la Traite des Noirs, promulga le Code Noir et pratiqua la ségrégation raciale sous le régime de l’Indigénat. En somme, la France substitua un mal domestique par son propre fléau, précisément celui de l’aliénation globale des populations de son Empire colonial africain, qu’elle appela sauvages, barbares, Nègres, etc.
Quant à la soi-disant Première République de Guinée, les auteurs refusent de l’identifier comme une dictature implacable qui détruisit la maigre infrastructure laissée par la France, tortura et/ou tua des milliers de prisonniers politiques au Camp Boiro. — Tierno S. Bah

11. — Le Fuuta-Jalon est réputé pour ses fortes densités démographiques. En effet, sur les hauts plateaux, des chiffres de 100 habitants/km2 sont régulièrement avancés. Parmi les plus élevés de Guinée, ils sont mis en relation avec un système de production agropastoral jugé consommateur d’espace 3 et font craindre, depuis la période coloniale, l’existence d’une surpopulation inquiétante mais jamais clairement démontrée. Nombreux sont ceux qui l’estiment préjudiciable à la bonne gestion et à la conservation des ressources naturelles, rappelant sans cesse la disparition de la forêt dense fuutanienne 4.

Un système agraire réputé uniforme
12. — A travers la prédominance des Fulɓe, la mise en valeur agro-pastorale a été le facteur prépondérant d’uniformisation du paysage et du système de production.

13. — Le Fuuta-Jalon a pu refléter l’image d’un espace très fortement humanisé et mis en valeur par une population toujours croissante, où la divagation du bétail impose des contraintes lisibles dans le paysage à travers les nombreuses clôtures végétales. L’histoire du peuplement, le poids de l’élevage, les conditions naturelles ont conduit à l’élaboration d’un paysage agraire typique, caractérisé principalement par le diptyque tapades-champs extérieurs. L’espace d’une exploitation agricole s’organise suivant un système de culture à deux composantes : les champs extérieurs (gese, sing. ngesa), sièges d’une agriculture extensive classique en Afrique, et les vastes jardins de case ou tapades, espace de production intensive. A cela s’ajoute l’élevage extensif, principalement bovin, basé sur la divagation.

14. — Les champs extérieurs sont l’oeuvre des hommes qui y pratiquent une culture sur brûlis généralement de fonio ou de riz. L’efficacité et la pérennité du système se fondent sur un temps de culture relativement court (1 à 3 ans), un temps de jachère long (8 à 15 ans) et la disponibilité de terres cultivables.

15. — La tapade, domaine exclusif des femmes, est le lieu des cultures en association (maïs, taro, manioc, arachide, haricot, piment, gombo…). Elle forme une véritable oasis, délimitée par des haies (clôtures) mortes, vives ou mixtes, et marquée par la présence de nombreux arbres fruitiers plantés (manguiers, orangers, avocatiers…), qui forçaient déjà l’admiration des premiers administrateurs coloniaux. Les sols, quelles que soient leurs potentialités d’origine, sont fortement amendés et offrent une remarquable fertilité, régulièrement entretenue.

Erratum. La tapade (hoggo) est l’enclos, la clôture. Elle relève de la responsabilité de l’homme (mari, fils, oncle, neveu, voisin(s), etc). C’est le jardin (suntuure, plur. suntuuji/cuntuuji) qui est le domaine exclusif de la femme (épouse, fille, mère, tante, nièce, voisine(s), etc.) — Tierno S. Bah

16. — Enfin, le système d’élevage présente des spécificités inscrites dans le paysage agraire : au Fuuta, le bétail est roi et ce sont les cultures que l’on parque. Les troupeaux en liberté divaguent au gré des pâtures à leur disposition. L’importance numérique du troupeau a toujours reflété la dignité et le statut social du propriétaire. D’après les textes majeurs qui ont participé à l’élaboration de l’image « officielle », le troupeau ne répondrait à aucun objectif réel de production, ce qui amena le géographe Jacques Richard-Molard à parler du “prétendu élevage foula” (Richard-Mollard, 1944).

Erratum. Un peu dans la veine de Gilbert Vieillard, Jacques Molard éprouva sympathie et affinité pour le pays et les populations du Fuuta-Jalon. Mais son lexique n’échappe pas —tout comme Vieillard, du reste — au langage paternaliste et eurocentriste colonial. Plus d’un demi-siècle après leurs devanciers sus-nommés les auteurs de cet article regardent le Fuuta à travers l’oeillère occidentale. D’où la phrase “le troupeau ne répondrait à aucun objectif réel de production.”  Ils sous-entendent l’application des normes et techniques de l’élevage industriel européen. Au risque de voiler leur propre analyse, Véronique André et Gilles Pestaña décident d’ignorer que l’Afrique, en général, la Guinée et le Fuuta-Jalon, en particulier, n’ont pas fait l’expérience de la Révolution industrielle, qui — pour le meilleur et le pire — propulsa l’hégémonie mondiale de l’Europe. Bref, loin d’être absolue, l’objectivité demeure une notion relative. Pour les Fulɓe l’élevage bovin n’était pas uniquement une activité de production. Il relevait de la cosmogonie avec Geno, le Créateur. Il participait d’une vision du monde et constituait tout un mode de vie, temporel et spirituel. Consulter Koumen, par Amadou Hampâté Bâ et Germaine Dieterlen.  — Tierno S. Bah

17. — L’ensemble de ces représentations du Fuuta a abouti à la construction d’un scénario “catastrophe” reposant sur des dysfonctionnements du système extensif aux conséquences préoccupantes : les pratiques paysannes, surtout dans un contexte de pression démographique croissante, mettraient en péril le “château d’eau de l’Afrique de l’Ouest” menaçant l’intégrité de l’environnement du Fuuta-Jalon.

Une dynamique de dégradation de l’environnement systématiquement dénoncée
18. — Le Fuuta-Jalon fait l’objet de discours récurrents, communs à de nombreuses régions d’Afrique, sur la dégradation du milieu. Les pratiques des pasteurs et agriculteurs sont jugés quasi unanimement comme responsables de la destruction des ressources. L’existence d’un cercle vicieux de dégradation de l’environnement lié à une pression démographique trop forte et incontrôlée est donc depuis longtemps admis sans réserve, et utilisé par la plupart des intervenants.

19. — Ce discours n’est pas nouveau. Depuis la colonisation française et jusqu’à ce jour, les administrateurs, les chercheurs et les techniciens n’ont cessé de s’inquiéter de l’avenir socio-économique et environnemental de cet espace réputé fragile, voué à l’agropastoralisme. Le scénario envisagé s’appuie sur une crise du système agraire dont les composantes sont : pratiques prédatrices, pression démographique, manque de terre, réduction du temps de jachère, appauvrissement des sols, déforestation totale et en définitive érosion catastrophique 5.

20. — Toujours selon les représentations courantes, le fort recul de la forêt (non daté ni évalué) favoriserait notamment une diminution des précipitations, l’irrégularité des débits des cours d’eau et même leur tarissement en saison sèche, donc une certaine “aridification” 6. La réduction drastique des temps de jachère, l’incendie répété des forêts et savanes auraient détruit peu à peu le sol, appauvri la flore en diminuant inévitablement la biodiversité, et favorisé l’action destructrice de l’érosion. Certains continuent de penser que les fameux boowe seraient le résultat terminal de l’évolution des sols ferrallitiques sous l’influence des feux de brousse associée à la déforestation de “la vaste forêt originelle” 7.

21. — C’est la fonction même de “château d’eau de l’Afrique de l’Ouest” qui serait directement mise en péril. Les conséquences pourraient s’avérer dramatiques, comme l’illustre une allocution du Ministre de l’Agriculture, de l’Elevage et de la Forêt, lors du séminaire sur le programme régional d’aménagement des bassins versants du Haut Niger et de la Haute Gambie à Conakry en mars 1995 : “Quand un arbre brûle au Fuuta-Jalon, c’est le taux de carbone qui augmente dans l’atmosphère, c’est un affluent du Niger ou de la Gambie qui verra son écoulement perturbé, c’est Tombouctou qui manquera d’eau en fin de saison sèche”. Ainsi les avis sont-ils unanimes, soutenant l’impérieuse nécessité d’intervenir pour “restaurer” et “protéger” le massif du Fuuta-Jalon. De nombreux projets poursuivant cette seule fin ont donc été mis en oeuvre dont le plus important reste le projet d’envergure régional « Restauration et protection du massif du Fuuta-Jalon », initié par l’O.U.A. en 1979.

22. — De cet exposé rapide sur les représentations de l’espace régional et de sa gestion par les paysans, l’image d’une région relativement homogène mais menacée par l’Homme domine. Les principales idées récurrentes caractérisant le Fuuta-Jalon ont été ici évoquées. Cette image issue de la période coloniale et non exempte de néo-malthusiannisme, s’est trouvée renforcée sinon confortée par le paradigme du développement durable et le rôle des projets de développement rural. Ceux-ci ont largement contribué à diffuser, ou tout au moins à entretenir, l’image d’un Fuuta-Jalon à la géographie monolithique 8. Simples exécutants de politiques pensées en amont, les artisans des projets n’ont pas pu nuancer ou remettre en cause les représentations majoritaires et ont même accentué une vision catastrophiste de l’avenir, justifiant alors des interventions extérieures lourdes. Traversant trois régimes politiques très différents, ces représentations se sont édifiées, renforcées jusqu’à devenir une caricature parfois dogmatique.

Quelques enseignements du terrain
23. — Afin de mettre à l’épreuve les représentations de la région, de ses systèmes ruraux et de ses problématiques environnementales, la comparaison de deux campagnes 9 du Fuuta-Jalon permet de prendre la mesure du risque à considérer ces représentations comme vérités absolues.

Deux campagnes, deux visages
24. — Les espaces ruraux comparés sont tous deux inclus dans les Fuuta-Jalon historique, climatique, géologique, ethnique et dans le Fuuta-Jalon administratif c’est-à-dire la Moyenne Guinée (fig. 1). La campagne au sud de Wuree-Kaba sera comparée à celle proche du centre urbain de Pita (environs de Bantiŋel et des Timbis).

Un espace de transition et de contact (Wuree-Kaba) et une campagne des hauts plateaux (Pita)
25. — La campagne de Wuree-Kaba s’étend à l’extrême sud-est du Fuuta-Jalon et appartient administrativement à la préfecture de Mamou. Formée de croupes granitiques de basse altitude, en moyenne 300 m, qui donnent au paysage un aspect assez accidenté, cette campagne se situe dans une zone de transition entre les influences montagnardes des hauts plateaux et celles plus soudaniennes de Haute Guinée. Les précipitations y sont plus abondantes (autour de 1800 mm), les températures plus chaudes et la végétation plus fournie que celles des hauts plateaux fuutaniens.

26. — Périphérie du Fuuta physique, Wuree-Kaba appartenait au diwal de Timbo et correspond à une ancienne marche historique. Offrant un caractère frontalier (avec la Sierra Léone), elle constitue aussi une zone de contact entre les populations fulɓe et malinké qui se sont partagées le territoire jusqu’à aujourd’hui. Si les Malinké sont cultivateurs, les Fulɓe sont demeurés pour l’essentiel des éleveurs nomades ou semi-sédentaires.

27. — La région de Pita situé au coeur du Fuuta, appartient à la dorsale des hauts plateaux et présente dans la région des Timbis, au nord-ouest, un aspect tabulaire (dénommée abusivement “plaine” des Timbis) comme dans la zone de Bantiŋel au nord-est. Le caractère semi-montagnard y est nettement affirmé avec une amplitude thermique annuelle plus marquée que dans la région de Wuree-Kaba. Le couvert végétal herbacé ou arbustif est discontinu à l’exception des forêts galeries. La région constitue l’un des bastions du Fuuta théocratique et la population fulɓe est fortement majoritaire, d’autant que les descendants des captifs tendent à s’y fondre. Tous les ruraux sont ici des sédentaires principalement cultivateurs.

Deux contextes démographiques
28. — L’inégale densité de population marque une première différence de taille entre les deux campagnes. La campagne de Pita avec 70 à 100 habitants/km2 apparaît comme relativement peuplée à l’échelle du Fuuta-Jalon mais aussi à l’échelle de l’Afrique de l’Ouest. Ces chiffres traduisent une sédentarisation déjà ancienne et une forte emprise humaine sur un paysage largement façonné par le système agraire.

29. — A l’opposé, la campagne de Wuree-Kaba paraît peu peuplée au sein du Fuuta avec seulement de 10 à 15 habitants/km2. La population actuellement résidente est encore en voie de sédentarisation. Les éléments les plus fixes sont les cultivateurs malinké. Les Fulɓe quant à eux se répartissent schéma-tiquement dans deux catégories : les semi-sédentaires, d’une part, réinstallés durablement depuis la chute de la Première République ; les nomades d’autre part, qui suivent leurs boeufs au gré des zones de pâturage favorables et dont l’installation temporaire repose sur des accords passés avec les propriétaires fulɓe et malinké.

Deux systèmes agro-pastoraux aux fonctionnements distincts
30. — Il existe donc d’une part, une campagne où l’emprise humaine est suf-fisamment forte et ancienne pour avoir façonné un paysage agraire établi et d’autre part, une campagne où la population récemment installée ou réinstallée n’a engendré qu’un paysage agraire “sommaire” et instable.

31. — La tapade n’est pas systématique au Fuuta-Jalon.

32. — Dans la région de Pita, les vastes tapades représentent le socle du système de production puisqu’il s’agit du seul espace agricole pérenne et commun à toutes les familles. Elles constituent un élément fondamental du paysage, véritables îlots de verdure construits et dont les haies plantées démontrent un savoir-faire accumulé depuis des générations.

33. — A Wuree-Kaba, pas de trace de tapade : au mieux, il existe une haie morte sommaire autour des cases rudimentaires et rares sont les arbres fruitiers et les cultures pratiquées à proximité des habitations. Cette absence peut s’expliquer par une sédentarisation encore fragile, l’influence des Malinké qui n’ont traditionnellement pas de tapade, et l’omnipotence de l’élevage qui impose déjà de gros efforts pour ceinturer les champs extérieurs.

34. — Les champs extérieurs : différence de nature, différence de gestion.

35. — Dans la région de Pita, l’exploitation des champs extérieurs est l’objet d’une concertation collective qui permet de mieux gérer les ressources naturelles et favorise une meilleure protection des cultures contre la divagation du bétail. Le fonio constitue la culture principale sur des sols très pauvres, de type dantari et hollandé 10.

36. — A Wuree-Kaba, il n’y a pas de véritable concertation pour le défrichement des champs extérieurs. Chacun peut cultiver là où il le souhaite à la condition de dresser une clôture protectrice. Ces champs extérieurs cultivés en riz reposent généralement sur des sols hansanghéré 11 relativement fertiles.

Eléments des dynamiques rurales et environnementales
37. — Deux campagnes, deux visages, deux trajectoires : la combinaison des différents facteurs identifiés précédemment implique une divergence tangible des transformations sociales, économiques et environnementales des campagnes.

38. — Des dynamiques démographiques divergentes.

39. — Les deux campagnes connaissent bien entendu un accroissement naturel relativement élevé mais le solde migratoire constitue un critère majeur de différenciation des dynamiques démographiques.

40. — Wuree-Kaba : une campagne en peuplement : La campagne au sud de Wuree-Kaba constitue un cas sans doute rare au Fuuta-Jalon puisque les arrivants sont aujourd’hui plus nombreux que ceux qui partent. Le retour de la Sierra Léone représente un facteur conjoncturel auquel se combine une évolution plus structurelle, la sédentarisation, même si celle-ci paraît encore hésitante.

Note. Cet influx était peut-être conjoncturel et était provoqué par  la présence de refugiés fuyant la guerre civile de Sierra Léone toute proche. Lire “La Guinée dans les guerres dans la sous-région du Fleuve Mano: une implication dangereuse” in Lansana Conté. Incertitudes autour d’une Fin de Règne (2003). —Tierno S. Bah

41. — Un exode rural sensible dans la campagne de Pita : La campagne de Pita connaît un exode rural conséquent, phénomène des plus répandus au Fuuta-Jalon et qui n’est pas l’apanage des seuls hauts plateaux. Les hommes, surtout s’ils sont jeunes, ont une plus forte propension à l’émigration temporaire ou définitive. Dans la sous-préfecture de Timbi-Madina, 48% des maris sont absents et 79% des jeunes hommes sont partis à Conakry ou à l’étranger (Beck, 1990). Dans les villages, les hommes et les adolescents se font rares, particulièrement en saison sèche, lorsque le travail est moindre.

Composition et recomposition : deux trajectoires pour les systèmes ruraux
42. — Wuree-Kaba : un espace abondant à conquérir, une campagne en construction. Toutes proportions gardées, la situation actuelle du système agraire de la campagne de Wuree-Kaba donne des éléments de compréhension sur la sédentarisation des populations et l’évolution du système agraire dans celle de Pita d’il y a trois siècles et peut-être davantage. En effet, cette campagne apparaît en pleine composition ou construction avec l’arrivée de nouvelles familles. Il reste encore suffisamment d’espace pour défricher ou brûler “librement” à des fins culturales ou pastorales. L’abondance des terres, la facilité d’accès au foncier engagent à des pratiques extensives d’élevage et de culture, mais aussi d’une certaine façon à des pratiques extensives de peuplement. Ces pratiques extensives renvoient au moins à deux logiques : une logique économique et une logique sociale. La logique économique de l’extensif a notamment été évoquée par P. Pélissier (1978, p.5) qui à l’aide de multiples exemples indique, à juste titre, que pour le paysan africain “la productivité maxima du travail est assurée par la consommation de l’espace” (Couty, 1988, l’a également calculé en économie). La logique sociale s’inscrit dans le besoin de conquérir l’espace disponible, de le marquer socialement. L’exploitation extensive permet ainsi d’affirmer son droit d’usage et de s’assurer du “contrôle foncier” (Pélissier, 1978, p. 7).

43. — Ces logiques permettent de mieux appréhender les dynamiques du système rural. Le genre de vie (une sédentarisation balbutiante) et le besoin de marquer le territoire expliquent que l’habitat soit beaucoup plus dispersé que dans la campagne de Pita dont la population est depuis longtemps établie. La volonté de contrôler l’espace explique aussi que les paysans (même malinké) défrichent des superficies plus vastes que celles qu’ils pourront réellement cultiver. En schématisant, les pratiques extensives exacerbées correspondent à une course au défrichement.

44. — L’absence de tapade est à la fois un indice et une conséquence des logiques évoquées. Une installation très récente et encore hésitante hypothèque toute velléité d’élaboration et d’entretien d’un jardin de case (plantation de fruitiers, construction d’une haie et transfert de fertilité). Malgré des conditions favorables (déjections abondantes) le besoin de réaliser un espace de production intensive ne se fait pas encore sentir. De plus, le régime alimentaire rudimentaire des Fulɓe, composé essentiellement de riz et de lait se passe pour l’instant de tous les produits généralement cultivés dans la tapade. L’espace agricole de Wuree-Kaba ne montre pas aujourd’hui de caractère de saturation. Cependant, dans les faits, deux systèmes agraires cohabitent, l’un plus agricole (malinké), l’autre plus pastoral (fulɓe). Leur coexistence génère des conflits d’usages des ressources mais sans remettre en cause ni le fonctionnement ni la reproduction à court terme de ces systèmes agraires. Par contre les pratiques extensives et expéditives, et la cohabitation de deux systèmes agraires, favorisent une gestion des ressources assez désordonnée. “Course au défrichement” et besoins croissants en bois de clôture pour les champs se conjuguent pour exercer une pression tangible sur les ressources ligneuses notamment. Celles-ci ne manquent pas mais sont fortement sollicitées.

Note. Pour une description détaillée et fiable du jardin ménager (suntuure), lire William Derman, “The Economy of the Fouta-Djallon” et “Women’s Gardens” in Serfs, Peasants, and Socialists: A former Serf Village in the Republic of Guinea (1968). — Tierno S. Bah

45. — Les périodes de crise des systèmes agraires sont en général souvent considérées comme propices à une pression accrue sur l’environnement. Ici, au contraire, une forte pression anthropique s’exerce sur les ressources alors même que le contexte se caractérise par une faible densité démographique et un équilibre momentané du système.

46. — Pita : une campagne en voie de recomposition : La campagne qui s’étend autour de Pita traverse une période de recomposition du système agraire et plus globalement peut-être du système rural. Le paysage est ici entièrement anthropisé, et la gestion du terroir villageois suit des règles collectives. Ici, peut-être plus que partout ailleurs, la pression démographique a été crainte puis utilisée pour expliquer la pauvreté des sols, le manque de terre, la diminution du temps de jachère puis l’exode rural. Gilbert Vieillard, dont l’oeuvre ethnologique est pourtant des plus précieuses et respectables, se lamentait : “Dans le Labé, et surtout dans les Timbis, le spectacle de la campagne évoque une campagne française. Il n’y a plus d’arbres qu’autour des habitations, les plaines sont nues, en jachère ou en culture, et malheureusement souvent épuisées : on est arrivé au dernier stade, après lequel il n’y a plus qu’à émigrer pour cultiver ailleurs” (G. Vieillard, 1940, p.197).

47. — La pauvreté des sols dans la campagne de Pita fait l’unanimité ; son origine est fondamentalement intrinsèque et finalement assez peu anthropique. Bantiŋel et plus encore Timbi-Madina se caractérisent par la prépondérance de sols pauvres de type dantari et hollandé (un quart et un tiers de la superficie des sous-préfectures) La maigreur des repousses végétales lors des périodes de jachère s’explique par la médiocrité chimique des sols et leur faible épaisseur. Cette particularité fonde en partie la prépondérance de la culture de fonio (Digitaria exilis), plante très peu exigeante. Beaucoup ont rendu le fonio responsable de l’épuisement des sols, or il semble plus juste de penser que les agriculteurs pratiquent la seule culture possible étant donné la qualité des sols.

48. — En 1990, les études menées par Jean Vogel (Vogel, 1990) sur la fonioculture décrivent des rotations culturales de 3 à 7 ans de culture suivie de 7 à 9 ans de jachère, avec une utilisation du feu très limitée, voire absente. En 1944, Jacques Richard-Mollard mentionnait : “A Timbi-Madina, l’on ne dépasse guère la 7ème année (de culture), la moyenne s’établit entre 3 et 6 années quand le terrain n’est bon qu’au fonio. Puis jachère de 7 ans”. Autrement dit, contrairement aux idées reçues, la diminution du temps de jachère sur près de 50 ans ne peut être avérée. Il apparaît au contraire une relative stabilité du temps de jachère des champs extérieurs même si l’on ne connaît pas les détails de l’évolution entre ces deux dates. Dans le village de Ndantari, à l’ouest de Pita, le temps de jachère est resté lui aussi constant (4-5 ans) entre 1955 (Mission démographique de Guinée, 1955) et 1997 (enquêtes personnelles). Les paysans déclarent aujourd’hui qu’ils ont individuellement diminué la surface des champs extérieurs cultivés. A proximité de Bantiŋel, les anciens, aujourd’hui bien seuls au village, regrettent que la terre ne soit plus cultivée et sont unanimes pour reconnaître que les temps de repos de la terre augmentent : les champs sont défrichés tous les 10 à 15 ans actuellement au lieu des 7 à 9 ans dans le passé (enquêtes personnelles, 1997).

49. — La non réduction du temps de jachère est étroitement liée d’une manière globale à la recomposition du système rural. L’un des aspects majeurs de cette recomposition correspond aux effets de l’émigration. Outre des impacts directs sur la charge démographique, le facteur émigration se révèle fondamental dans les conséquences indirectes qu’il induit. Le rôle des transferts monétaires, dans les revenus familiaux par exemple, semble loin d’être négligeable (même si les données précises manquent) et audelà pèse sur la physionomie de l’économie et de la société locale. De plus, l’effet le plus décisif de l’émigration reste la fuite des actifs, particulièrement des hommes et des jeunes. Ceux qui restent, les anciens, les enfants et les femmes, ne peuvent pas perpétuer le même système de culture. Ce phénomène est à l’origine d’un repli vers les cultures de tapades. L’emprise spatiale des tapades dans les espaces villageois de la sous-préfecture de Timbi-Madina, est d’ailleurs particulièrement forte : jusqu’à 20 % de la surface totale du terroir.

50. — Le travail de E. Boserup a été très souvent simplifié au point de réduire sa pensée à une évolution qui lierait de manière étroite l’émergence d’un système de culture plus intensif à un accroissement continu de la population. Si cette interprétation peut se vérifier en maintes régions, force est de constater que dans la campagne de Pita, ce n’est pas parce qu’il n’y a plus assez de terres que les paysans se replient sur l’intensif, mais surtout parce qu’il n’y a plus assez d’hommes.

51 L’exode rural n’est pas seul à l’origine d’un recul agricole (économique et/ou spatial). Les activités “secondaires” sont parfois prépondérantes. D’après l’enquête de J.M. Garreau (1993, p. 48) dans les Timbis, seuls 59% des chefs de famille se déclaraient d’abord cultivateurs et au moins 50% des “exploitations” ont un revenu global largement déconnecté de l’agriculture. Dans les 50% restants, pour 25% des exploitations (appartenant aux roundés), la production agricole repose en grande partie sur des cultures intensives (bas-fonds, tapades et champs de pomme de terre) avec un but lucratif clairement affiché. L’exploitation des bas-fonds, par les revenus qui en découlent, apparaît aujourd’hui comme une donnée essentielle dans la campagne de Pita. Un contexte favorable (V. André et G. Pestaña, 1998) a permis à certaines familles de s’orienter vers des spéculations rentables (la pomme de terre ou l’ail par exemple), qui trouvent un débouché national voire international (vers le Sénégal notamment), grâce au dynamisme du marché de Timbi-Madina et à une bonne organisation de l’exportation par l’intermédiaire des commerçants et des transporteurs.

52. — Mais au-delà de la recomposition du système agraire, c’est l’ensemble du système rural qui se modifie. Outre une économie rurale et des ménages de plus en plus extravertis (activités de rente, émigration, transferts monétaires, etc.), la société se transforme avec une redistribution des rôles, et parfois l’émergence de conflits latents ou naissants. Parmi ces évolutions, les femmes en raison d’un pouvoir économique accru, en particulier à la faveur des activités de maraîchage, et de l’absence du mari voient leur rôle redéfini au sein de la famille (V. André et G. Pestaña, 1998). Toutefois, cela ne se passe pas toujours sans heurts ou sans débats au sein des ménages et même des villages. D’autre part, des tensions foncières entre anciennes familles de maîtres et descendants de captifs peuvent ressurgir. Les premiers se réclament propriétaires de terres, notamment de bas-fonds, alors même que les descendants de captifs les cultivent depuis plusieurs générations parfois et en tirent de substantiels revenus.

53. — Au total, la campagne de Pita connaît une évolution non conforme aux représentations classiques, avec un recentrage sur les activités non-agricoles, les espaces de production intensive, et une modification en profondeur de certains rapports socio-économiques. Enfin, la plupart des attaques portées aux pratiques paysannes supposées responsables, à elles seules, de la dégradation de l’environnement ne tiennent plus : le feu est relativement peu usité, les défrichements intensifs et abusifs sont fatalement limités voire inexistants du fait de la pauvreté structurelle d’une grande partie des sols et d’une certaine stagnation et voire une régression des surfaces de champs extérieurs.

54. — Les deux études de cas illustrent le décalage sensible entre certaines représentations du Fuuta-Jalon héritées, et les résultats de travaux de recherches actuels. Elles fondent l’idée d’une réelle diversité des paysages du Fuuta, des populations et des dynamiques rurales, sans pour cela renier l’existence globale d’une région fuutanienne.

Dépasser les caricatures pour mieux comprendre les mutations actuelles
55. — L’accumulation des simplifications et la vétusté des analyses expliquent le hiatus entre les représentations courantes du Fuuta et la situation de nombre de ses campagnes. Prendre acte de cette diversité, c’est tenter de dépasser ou plus modestement enrichir des représentations qui à force de se scléroser tendent à devenir des caricatures, quelque peu vidées de sens. Les contrastes mis en relief dans l’étude comparative de deux campagnes du Fuuta-Jalon fournissent plusieurs entrées permettant de dégager, à l’échelle régionale cette fois, plusieurs facteurs élémentaires de diversité.

Quelques nuances régionales élémentaires

Un éventail de paysages, de potentialités et de terroirs
56. — Le massif du Fuuta-Jalon ne se résume pas aux seuls plateaux “centraux”, et se compose aussi de “la région environnante” : c’est souvent de cette façon que le reste de la région est évoqué 12, alors que cette “périphérie” comprend des hauts lieux de l’histoire du Fuuta Jaloo, tels que Timbo, Kébali ou Fougoumba. Compartimenté, le massif s’organise suivant un système de plateaux étagés. Par l’intermédiaire de gradins successifs, trois niveaux topographiques se superposent. L’axe central constitue le niveau supérieur à partir de 1000 m. A l’est de celui-ci, se localise un niveau topographique inférieur que l’on retrouve de Tougué à Timbo et dont les altitudes varient de 700 à 900 m. Un dernier palier à 300-600 m s’individualise particulièrement bien à l’ouest dans les régions de Télimélé, Gaoual et au sud dans la région de Wuree-Kaba.

57. — Il n’est pas nécessaire d’entrer dans les détails pour rendre compte de la diversité des situations biophysiques au Fuuta-Jalon. Le paramètre climatique donne à lui seul une idée des distinctions nécessaires à établir. Les marches occidentales du Fuuta constituent des espaces plus chauds et humides que les hauts plateaux où se combinent une relative proximité de l’influence océanique, des altitudes plus basses que le reste du massif, une protection des hauts plateaux qui minorent les effets desséchants de l’Harmattan d’origine continentale… En revanche, dans le Fuuta oriental la continentalité s’affirme avec des précipitations moindres et des amplitudes thermiques annuelles plus marquées.
A ces considérations viennent s’ajouter des facteurs azonaux : l’ouverture sur la grande plateforme mandingue favorise le souffle de l’Harmattan en saison sèche et la présence de hauts plateaux à l’ouest limite les précipitations d’hivernage. La végétation présente alors des caractères fortement soudaniens. Enfin, au sein même des hauts plateaux, les vallées profondes qui les morcellent (comme celle de la Kakrima) déterminent des enclaves chaudes et humides, fort originales.

58. — Il faut bannir l’idée d’Un terroir fuutanien : nuances climatiques, topographie, palettes et répartitions des sols se combinent, individualisant des “équations naturelles” variées.

Une configuration sociale plus complexe qu’il n’y paraît
59. — La composition ethnique et les hiérarchies sociales des campagnes du Fuuta-Jalon se présentent comme un puzzle dont de nombreuses pièces seraient manquantes. Il s’agit d’un champ d’étude sensible et encore peu exploité. Moins apparente et lisible que les paysages, la configuration sociale peut influencer l’organisation du système rural à l’échelle locale, même si la composante “ethnique” semble une entrée sans grand intérêt et relever d’une perception aussi obsolète que polémique. A première vue la faible pertinence d’une telle entrée repose sur le postulat que les minorités non fulɓe ont été assimilées et que leurs système agraire et organisation sociale ont subi une “foulanisation”.

Erratum. — Les travaux de Gilbert Vieillard (1940), Cantrelle & Dupire (1964), Telli Diallo (1958),  Thierno Diallo (1972), etc. démontrent que “les hiérarchies sociales” du Fuuta-Jalon théocentrique n’avaient rien d’ambigu. De fait, Telli souligne que la société fuutanienne était “très homogène, fortement disciplinée, hiérarchisée et organisée en une féodalité théocratique.” A l’opposé donc de tout “puzzle” indéchiffrable ! Concrètement, le Fuuta-Jalon formait une pyramide solide reposant sur (a) la communauté rurale groupée autour de la mosquée (misiide, de l’arabe masjid), (b) le siège du pouvoir provincial (diiwal (plur. diiwe), de l’arabe dîwân), pièce maîtresse de l’Etat confédéral dirigé par l’Almami à partir de Timbo. Les individus et groupes n’étaient pas non plus des pièces flottantes. Au contraire, ils s’intégraient aux lignages ancestraux, aux clans et aux quatre tribus  patronymiques : Baa, Bari, Jallo, Soo. Hampâté Bâ indique cette organisation quadripartite correspond aux quatre élements fondamentaux (eau, air, terre, lumière), aux quatre points cardinaux (nord, sud, est, ouest), et aux quatres couleurs principales de la robe de la vache. — Tierno S. Bah

60. — Si un tel postulat peut se vérifier en de nombreux lieux et notamment dans les plateaux centraux, il demeure bien hasardeux dès que l’on s’éloigne du Fuuta central. En fait, de nombreuses poches de minorités subsistent. Par exemple, les Dialonké du Sangala sont majoritaires au nord-est de Koubia, dans les campagnes proches de Balaki, Gaɗa-Wundu, Fello-Kunduwa.

Erratum. — Sangala et Balaki relèvent de la préfecture de Mali, et Gaɗa-Wundu de Kubiya. Plusieurs minorités ethniques vivent au Fuuta-Jalon. Elles y sont soit enclavées dans le Fuuta central. Par exemple, les Jalonke de Sannoun à 25 km de la ville de Labé, ou bien à Sangareya, dans Pita, etc. Sangala s’éteand à la périphérie Nord du Fuuta, dans Mali. L’article ne localise les Sarakole que dans Mali. En réalité, ils sont éparpillés à travers le Fuuta. Avec leur sens des affaires et leur maîtrise de certains arts et métiers, ils acquirent droit de cité depuis des siècls. Ils sont prospères à Labe-ville, à Leluma dans la sous-préfecture éponyme de Saran.
Les Jakanke sont également présents partout : Labé, Gaoual, Pita, Mali, etc. Vassale des seigneurs Kaliduyaaɓe de la province (Diiwal) du Labé, Touba devint une principauté religieuse et économique prospère. Persécutée par la France, elle déclina et chuta avec le deuxième exil d’Alfa Yaya Diallo en 1910.
Et n’oublions pas les Koniagui, Basari, Badiaranke, et bien sûr les Fulɓe Fulakunda— Tierno S. Bah

61. — Ces minorités ont pu préserver une organisation sociale, un type d’habitat et/ou des stigmates agraires sensiblement différents de ceux généralement attribués aux populations fulɓe . Ainsi, à Badougoula, à l’ouest de la préfecture de Mali, les Sarakole possèdent un système agraire original basé sur une culture des berges de la Bantala avec des tapades réduites et peu productives (B. Ly, 1998) qui les rapprochent du simple jardin de case. De la même façon, on ne peut pas ignorer que certains Fulɓe demeurent de purs éleveurs comme dans les boowe de Gaoual ou de Télimélé, lieux où la tapade est inexistante à l’instar de Wuree-Kaba.

62. — Nombreux sont aussi les villages roundés dont les populations sont spécialisées dans un artisanat (forgerons, potiers, cordonniers,..) et qui constituent autant de groupes intégrés mais non assimilés. Selon la proportion de descendants de captifs, leurs plus ou moins grandes émancipations sociale et économique, les contextes locaux connaissent parfois des spécificités, bien délicates à extrapoler. Pour une meilleure compréhension des systèmes ruraux du Fuuta-Jalon, il convient donc de prendre en considération la composition et l’organisation de la société locale, mais en se gardant bien entendu de tout déterminisme ethnique ou social.

63. — La société du Fuuta-Jalon apparaît finalement comme une mosaïque dont la foulanisation n’est ni systématique ni totale. Plutôt que le “pays des Fulɓe”, il serait plus rigoureux de qualifier cette région comme le pays où l’influence fulɓe est prépondérante.

Seule la méconnaissance ou une compréhension superficielle de quelque 500 ans d’histoire économique, culturelle, politique et linguistique du Fuuta-Jalon peut conduire à une affirmation aussi péremptoire. D’où le découpage numérique des paragraphes du texte, qui entrave la trame de la narration. — Tierno S. Bah

D’importants contrastes de densités humaines
64. — Si l’on en croit le Recensement Général de la Population et de l’Habitat de 1983 (celui de 1996 demeurant en grande partie inutilisable), la Moyenne Guinée enregistre une densité moyenne de 22,5 hab./km2 qui peut sembler relativement modeste.

65. — Mais les chiffres et les impressions qui ont frappé les esprits concernent les hauts plateaux où les densités proposées dépassent 50 hab./km2 pour la quasi-totalité des souspréfectures, avec des maxima dépassant les 120 hab./km2 (fig. 2) pour celles de Dionfo, Daralabé, Noussy (202 hab./km2). Il est vrai que des densités rurales supérieures à 50 habitants/km2 sont peu fréquentes au sein d’une Afrique de l’Ouest où le Fuuta-Jalon apparaît nettement comme un pôle de fortes densités. Cela pourrait conforter l’image d’une éventuelle pression démographique si les densités n’étaient pas spatialement fortement hétérogènes. De nombreuses campagnes du Fuuta-Jalon connaissent en effet des densités bien inférieures, sans commune mesure avec celles des hauts plateaux. La carte des densités montre une organisation en auréoles autour du “noyau” démographique de Labé, selon un gradient décroissant (moins de 15 hab./km2 sur la périphérie).

66. — Afin de mieux cerner les réalités des contextes démographiques, il conviendrait de raisonner en terme de charge de population et de rapporter la population totale à la superficie cultivable. Cela révélerait, par exemple, des charges démographiques importantes dans les régions où les boowe sont très étendus, comme celles de Koubia, Tougué, Doŋel-Sigon ou encore de Télimélé. Or actuellement, les insuffisances quantitative et qualitative des statistiques ne peuvent permettre une telle étude. L’analyse des rapports entre société et espace ne peut ignorer de tels contrastes de densité, qui suggèrent l’existence de contextes et de perspectives hétérogènes voire parfois opposés.

Une influence des contextes géo-économiques et politiques à prendre en considération
67. — La situation géographique, les contextes économiques et politiques peuvent influencer directement ou indirectement les dynamiques rurales et sont autant de facteurs de diversité des campagnes du Fuuta-Jalon.

68. — L’enclavement représente un facteur majeur d’inégalité économique au Fuuta-Jalon. Malgré d’importants efforts, de nombreuses campagnes demeurent mal desservies ou inaccessibles du fait de pistes impraticables durant toute ou une partie de l’année. Certaines campagnes (les boowe de Koubia et Télimélé entre autres) ont une économie empreinte d’autarcie tandis que d’autres (telles Timbo ou Timbi-Madina) grâce au bitume, ou à des pistes de réfection récente, connaissent un dynamisme en partie ou largement lié à des possibilités d’écoulement des produits agricoles.

69. — La proximité d’un centre urbain ou d’un marché hebdomadaire actif correspond aussi à un facteur d’inégalité spatiale. La proximité d’une ville génère des opportunités de vente de produits de l’agriculture ou de l’artisanat, des opportunités d’activités citadines comme le commerce. Des embryons de ceintures maraîchères commencent à se développer dans les villages à la périphérie des villes les plus dynamiques, à l’image de Labé.

70. — L’aire d’action des projets de développement peut aussi jouer un rôle dans la diversité des trajectoires économiques. Il est indéniable que certains projets agricoles, tel que le Projet de Développement Agricole de Timbi-Madina, ont accompagné ou encouragé une modification du système de production de certaines exploitations paysannes et ce faisant du système rural de la campagne concernée.

71. — La proximité de la frontière représente un facteur supplémentaire de différenciation des dynamiques rurales. Les flux transfrontaliers de marchandises ou d’hommes modifient directement ou indirectement la physionomie des systèmes ruraux des espaces frontaliers. De plus, le contexte politique doit être pris en considération. La Première République avait signifié une fuite dans les pays voisins. Aujourd’hui, les drames récents de la Sierra Léone engendrent à l’inverse des flux d’immigrants.

72. — Les facteurs de diversité, tant des contextes que des dynamiques, n’ont pu être qu’effleurés. Mais il se comprend aisément qu’une région estimée à près de 80 000 km2 (G. Diallo et al., 1987), soit une fois et demi le Togo ou trois fois le Burundi, ne puisse être appréhendée de manière monolithique. Non seulement les plateaux centraux ne résument pas le Fuuta-Jalon mais encore faut-il s’efforcer de dépasser les représentations et les idées reçues les plus communes si l’on tient à comprendre les évolutions en cours et à les percevoir de façon plus réaliste.

Les représentations ne sont pas des diagnostics
73. — Les représentations les plus courantes du Fuuta se sont transmises, depuis les années 1930, de génération en génération. Et ce sont ces mêmes représentations qui constituent ou influencent fortement encore les bases des diagnostics élaborés par les « experts », diagnostics qui fondent ensuite les modes d’intervention de nombreux projets de développement, ignorant ainsi certaines nuances ou remises en cause du discours classique traitant du Fuuta-Jalon.

La pression démographique n’est pas généralisée
74. — L’examen des densités brutes de population a montré des contrastes importants. Les lacunes statistiques ne permettent pas toujours de prouver l’existence ou non d’une surpopulation.

75. — Le mythe de la surpopulation trouve davantage sa source dans des observations partielles et finalement des extrapolations d’abord accomplies par des cadres coloniaux. La surpopulation est un concept vieilli qui correspond à une vision étriquée des contextes économiques et géographiques. Depuis quelques décennies déjà, le concept de pression démographique exprime une dynamique plutôt qu’un état (la surpopulation). La pression démographique, souvent mise en avant au Fuuta-Jalon, demeure une notion bien délicate à généraliser tant les situations sont multiples et parfois contradictoires. A Wuree-Kaba, la pression démographique est un problème qui ne se pose pas (encore ?), tandis qu’à Pita il ne se pose plus… Dans le premier cas, la faiblesse du peuplement et la réserve d’espace n’obligent pour l’instant à aucune réduction des temps de jachère, tandis que dans le second cas, ceux-ci sont stabilisés et parfois en progression. Ces types de contre-exemples permettent de renier un discours univoque dans lequel la pression démographique représente une des principales problématiques du développement rural et durable aujourd’hui. Bien entendu, il n’est pas question ici de nier que de nombreuses campagnes dans l’ensemble du Fuuta subissent une relative pression sur les terres cultivables et doivent réduire leurs temps de jachère mais il faut aussi reconnaître que d’autres (Pita) souffrent d’une relative hémorragie de la population active et parfois d’une déprise rurale (Bantiŋel par exemple).

Note. — L’article mentionne seulement Wuree-Kaba et Pita/Bantiŋel. L’enquête de terrain aurait dû couvrir plusieurs sous-préfectures du Fuuta-Jalon, au lieu de se limiter à ces trois localités. De plus, en l’absence de données statistiques et de témoignages valides, les affirmations ci-dessus restent des opinions personnelles affaiblies par l’usage des mots subjectifs et des jugements de valeur suivants  : mythe, extrapolation, observations partielles, vieilli, étriqué. Avis catégoriques et tranchants des auteurs sur leurs devanciers dans la discipline ! — Tierno S. Bah

76. — En finir avec la tentation généralisatrice consiste à opérer une révolution copernicienne, en tenant le plus possible à l’écart les représentations courantes qui engendrent irrémédiablement un point aveugle puisqu’elles n’autorisent pas tous les questionnements.

Quel bilan pour l’environnement ?
77. — L’hypothèse d’un environnement menacé, déchu même, reposait sur un scénario associant pratiques culturales traditionnelles prédatrices et pression démographique exagérée. Les conséquences annoncées et souvent décrites comme avérées – elles hantent les représentations courantes du Fuuta étaient et sont toutes plus catastrophistes les unes que les autres : disparition du couvert arboré, réduction des temps de jachère, érosion incontrôlée, stérilisation des terres, jusqu’au pronostic d’une désertification…

78 — S’il est vrai que la pluviométrie annuelle diminue assez significati-vement depuis 1970, cela n’est point une spécificité fuutanienne, mais suit une tendance globale qui concerne l’ensemble de l ‘Afrique de l’Ouest. Enfin, une région qui reçoit entre 1400 et 1900 mm d’eau en moyenne, semble difficilement, même à moyen terme, menacée de désertification.

79. — De plus un certain nombre de principes et de mécanismes, considérés comme acquis et responsables d’une dégradation du milieu semblent loin d’être aussi effectifs que l’on veut bien le laisser croire. La campagne de Pita est sur ce point des plus représentatives. Localisée en un des lieux réputés les plus en danger du Fuuta, elle combine un certain dépeuplement à des temps de jachère en stagnation ou même en augmentation. Quant à Wuree-Kaba, s’il existe certes des défrichements, la disponibilité en terre autorise des rotations permettant une reconstitution correcte du couvert arboré.

80. — Mais plus étonnant encore est de ne pas trouver vraiment trace et reconnaissance (à l’exception de quelques travaux comme ceux de J. Vogel et C. Lauga-Sallenave) de la remarquable capacité des paysans à construire ou reconstruire leur environnement. Si l’on reconnaît que les haies vives des tapades sont de belle facture, il n’est jamais mentionné que ces mêmes haies totalement anthropiques sont d’une grande diversité botanique, contribuant à assurer une certaine biodiversité (Lauga-Sallenave, 1997). Elles gardent en revanche leur image d’élément du « paysage traditionnel fulɓe », grandes consommatrices de bois. De plus, si les premiers administrateurs coloniaux s’extasiaient déjà sur l’espace de production intensif que constitue cette même tapade, en terme d’environnement ou de gestion des ressources, on a tendance à oblitérer le fait que leurs sols, capables de hauts rendements, sont de véritables anthroposols (Vogel, 1993).

Pionniers ou successeurs, les fonctionnaires coloniaux français ne furent pas les seuls à apprécier le couplage de l’élevage et de l’agriculture (jardins ménagers —cuntuuji— et champs extérieurs — gese). Dans Serfs, Peasants, and Socialists: A former Serf Village in the Republic of Guinea (1968), le sociologue américain Derman en donne une description minutieuse et généralement positive. — Tierno S. Bah

81. — Quant à l’origine des boowe liée à la destruction de la mythique forêt dense et plus globalement à une déforestation ancienne et intense, elle n’a jamais été réellement démontrée. Certains auteurs (Rossi, 1998 ; André, 2002) proposent même une lecture et une analyse fort différentes du paysage à partir de son évolution morphopédologique et aboutissent à une tout autre conclusion : les boowe existaient tels quels à l’arrivée des Fulɓe et furent utilisés au mieux de leurs potentialités par les pasteurs qui les estimaient uniquement aptes à la pâture.

82. — Ainsi, aurait-on seulement voulu garder et transmettre l’image de paysans dévoreurs d’espaces forestiers, vampirisant la fertilité de sols pourtant souvent très pauvres à l’origine et menaçant la durabilité de leurs ressources ?… quand ils sont tout autant de remarquables bâtisseurs de haies, de vergers et de sols particulièrement fertiles. Là encore, se dégager des représentations, à la fois héritées mais aussi intégrées aux nouveaux soucis écologiques, devient une nécessité pour s’autoriser à mieux comprendre la gestion des ressources par la population.

Quelques mutations des systèmes ruraux à ne plus oblitérer
83. — Les représentations, aussi inévitables soient-elles, engagent trop souvent à ne suivre que des perspectives balisées. Leurs influences occultent encore fortement l’identification de mutations actuelles et fondamentales au sein des campagnes du Fuuta-Jalon. Parmi ces transformations, qui s’inscrivent dans les temps longs et les temps courts, la baisse de la prépondérance de l’agriculture dans de nombreux systèmes ruraux n’est pas des moindres. En effet, le bétail, par exemple, s’est largement raréfié dans les hauts plateaux, sans perdre totalement toutefois son rôle social, au point que l’image du pasteur Pullo appartient davantage à l’histoire qu’à l’actualité. En ce sens, l’exemple de Wuree-Kaba où le bétail est encore au centre du système agraire, indique concrètement que certaines campagnes du Fuuta-Jalon connaissent une évolution pour le moment bien étrangère à celle de ces hauts plateaux, d’où la nécessité de ne pas accoler trop vite des dynamiques constatées localement à un ensemble régional.

84. — L’exode rural, le développement des cultures commerciales dans les bas-fonds, la recomposition des rapports sociaux hommes/femmes et ex-maîtres/descendants de captifs sont quelques exemples de profondes mutations, de plus en plus prégnantes mais non systématiques, au sein des exploitations, des villages et des campagnes (V. André et G. Pestaña 1998a, 1998b). Ces mutations économiques, sociales et spatiales sont généralement minorées puisqu’elles n’entrent pas dans les schémas de pensée pré-établis et encore dominants.

85. — Les représentations les plus courantes ont progressivement élaboré un seul modèle pour la dynamique du milieu et des sociétés du Fuuta-Jalon, ainsi que pour les liens qu’ils entretiennent. A ce titre les problèmes de gestion de l’espace et de l’environnement sont considérés comme uniformes. Certes des éléments d’unité, et peut-être d’identité géographique, sont indéniables. Pourtant une analyse qui ne considère pas comme admis ce modèle et tente d’en vérifier la pertinence révèle que la région offre plusieurs visages. Les deux campagnes prises à titre d’illustration donnent une idée des contrastes spatiaux, socio-économiques et environnementaux que l’on rencontre, et illustrent le caractère stéréotypé de ces représentations encore dominantes.

86. — C’est la persistance des idées reçues, des simplifications et des généralisations hâtives, et parfois, la transcription locale de dogmes planétaires qui engendrent l’incompréhension des sociétés rurales, de leurs stratégies, de leurs capacités… et de leurs véritables problèmes. Le décalage entre ces représentations figées, ces postulats trompeurs peu ou pas remis en cause, et la réalité, est à l’origine d’une longue litanie d’échecs ou de demi-succès des opérations de développement. Si la connaissance des campagnes du Fuuta-Jalon doit encore progresser afin de nuancer des schémas trompeurs, cette nouvelle vision doit surtout être intégrée par des opérateurs dont les logiques internes et les modes opératoires s’accommodent mal de la diversité et de la nuance.

Bibliographie
André Véronique, 2002 – Environnement dégradé au territaire gére : le Fouta Djalon (République de Guinée). Bordeaux, 512 p (Doctorat de Géographie).
André Véronique et Pestaña Gilles, 1998a – Un écosystème au coeur des contradictions du développement : les bas-fonds du Fouta Djalon (Guinée). In : Table ronde « Dynamiques sociales et environnement, pour un dialogue entre chercheurs, opérateurs et bailleurs de fonds ». Bordeaux, 9-10-11 septembre 1998, 9 p.
André Véronique, Pestaña Gilles et Rossi Georges, 1998b – Agropastoralisme et dégradation du milieu, fantasmes et réalités : l’exemple d’une moyenne montagne tropicale, le Fouta-Djalon
(République de Guinée). In : Table ronde : BART François, Morin Serge et Salomon Jean-Noël, dirs. – Les montagnes tropicales : identités, mutations, développemen.t Bordeaux-Talence 27-28
novembre 1998, Pessac, Dymset-CRET, 2001, pp. 205-218.
André Yves, 1998 – Enseigner les représentations spatiales. Paris, Anthropos-Economica, 254 p.
Beck Monica, 1990 – Exode rural et systèmes de production : cas de la sous-préfecture de Timbi-Madina (Fouta-Djallon). Gembloux, Faculté des Sciences agronomiques, 106 p. + annexes (travail de fin d’étude d’ingénieur agronome).
Boserup Ester, 1970 – Evolution agraire et pression démographique. Paris, Flammarion, 221 p.
Botte Roger, 1994 – “Stigmates sociaux et discriminations religieuses : l’ancienne classe servile au Fuuta-Jaloo”. Cahiers d’Etudes Africaines, XXXIV (1-3), pp. 109-136.
Boulet Jean et Talineau Jean-Claude, 1988 – Eléments de l’occupation du milieu rural et systèmes de production agricole au Fouta Djalon (République de Guinée) : tentative de diagnostic d’évolution. ORSTOM, Cahiers des Sciences Humaines, 24 (1), pp. 99-117.
Couty Philippe, 1998 – Voir et comprendre le changement dans les sociétés africaines. Un point de vue d’économiste. Stateco, n° 56 pp. 5-25.
Detraux Micheline, 1991 – Approche intégrée des systèmes de production et de leur dynamique, un outil pour une politique agricole adaptée aux besoins des régions. Application au Fouta-Djallon (République de Guinée Conakry). Gembloux, Faculté des Sciences agronomiques, 404 p. + annexes (Doctorat de sciences agronomiques).
  Detraux Micheline, 1992 – Rapport de Mission. Restauration et aménagement du bassin représentatif pilote de Guétoya (Bantignel). MARA, PNUD, FAO, 65 p.
Diallo, I. Kegneko, 1989 – Historique et évoluton de la foresterie guinéenne. Annexe 3 du rapport de consultation nationale. Conakry, F.A.O., 107 p.
Djigo Seybatou A., 1988 – Reforestation, protection et aménagement de quatre bassins versants (Kokoulo, Fétoré, Doubi et Téné) et aména-gement du Bassin Représentatif Pilote de Guetoya (Bantignel). Conakry (Guinée), F.A.O., Rapport de mission, 112 p.
F.A.O, Rome, 1992 – Avant-Projet du Schéma Directeur d’Aménagement et de Gestion du BRP de Guetoya. Volume 1. Projet GUI/86/012 Restauration et aménagement du bassin représentatif pilote de Guetoya (Bantignel). MARA, PNUD, FAO, 137 p.
F.A.O, Rome, 1994 – Restauration et aménagement du bassin versant représentatif pilote de Guetoya (Bantignel). Conclusions et recommandations du projet. Rome, PNUD, FAO, 49 p.
Garreau Jean-Marc, 1993 – Approche des systèmes de production dans la région de Timbi-Madina (République de Guinée). Montpellier, Cnearc, 94 p. + annexes (mémoire de fin d’étude).
Hasson Bruno, 1988 – L’agriculture guinéenne. Afrique Agriculture, n°151, pp. 10-19.
Jouve Ph. et Tallec M., 1994 – Une méthode d’étude des systèmes agraires en Afrique de l’Ouest par l’analyse de la diversité et la dynamique des agro-systèmes villageois. In : Actes du Symposium Recherches-Système en agriculture et développement rural. Montpellier, Cirad, pp. 185-192.
Langdale-Brown I., 1962 – Rapport de la mission CCTA/FAMA sur les hauts plateaux du Fouta-Djallon (Guinée) 1961-1962, Volume I, Ecologie : utilisation et conservation des terres. Lagos, CCTA/FAMA, 1962, 43 p.
Lauga-Sallenave Carole, 1997 – Le cercle des haies. Paysages des agroéleveurs Fulɓe du Fouta-Djalon (Plaine des Timbis, Guinée). Paris, Université de Paris X-Nanterre, 423 p. (Doctorat de Géographie).
Ly Boun-Tieng, 1998 – Diagnostic des systèmes agraires du bassin versant de Koundou et ses environs. Données agro-socio-économiques de base. Labé, Projet de gestion des ressources naturelles, USAID Guinée, Winrock International, 112 p.
M.A.R.A et Union Européenne, 1995 – Actes du séminaire international sur le programme régional d’aménagement des bassins versants du Haut Niger et de la Haute Gambie. Conakry, 20-25 mai 1995, 120 p. + annexes.
O.U.A., 1981 – Aménagement intégré du massif du Fouta Djallon. Projet Régional Afrique PAF/81/060. 128 p. + annexes.
Pelissier Paul, 1978 – Le paysan et le technicien : quelques aspects d’un difficile face à face. In : Actes du colloque de Ouagadougou 4-8 décembre 1978, « Maîtrise de l’espace agraire et développement en Afrique tropicale. Logique paysanne et rationalité technique », Paris, ORSTOM pp. 1-8. (Mémoires ORSTOM, n° 89)
Perreira-Barreto S. et Van Es F.W.J., 1962 – Rapport de la mission CCTA/FAMA sur les hauts plateaux du Fouta Djallon (Guinée), 1961-1962, Volume II, Pédologie. Lagos, CCTA/FAMA, 101 p.
Pouquet Jean, 1956 – Aspects morphologiques du Fouta Dialon (régions de Kindia et de Labé, Guinée française, AOF). Caractères alarmants des phénomènes d’érosion des sols déclenchés par les activités humaines. Revue de Géographie Alpine, Grenoble, pp. 233-245.
Pouquet Jean, 1956 – Le plateau du Labé (Guinée française, A.O.F.). Remarques sur le caractère dramatique des phénomènes d’érosion des sols et sur les remèdes proposés. Bulletin de l’IFAN, Dakar, Tome XVIII, série A, n°1, p.1-16.
Racine Jean (sous la dir.), 1988 – La dynamique des systèmes ruraux : les enjeux de la diversification. Une approche des tiers-mondes. Talence : CEGET, Projet de recherche 1988-1991, Atelier rural du CEGET, 25 p.
Richard-Mollard Jacques, 1942 – Les traits d’ensemble du Fouta-Djallon. Revue de Géographie Alpine, Grenoble, XXXI (2), pp. 199-213.
Richard-Mollard Jacques, 1944 – Essai sur la vie paysanne au Fouta-Djallon : le cadre physique, l’économie rurale, l’habitat. Revue de Géographie Alpine Grenoble, XXXII (2), pp. 135-239.
Roca Pierre-Jean, 1987 – Différentes approches des systèmes agraires. In : Terres, comptoirs, silos : des systèmes de production aux politiques alimentaires. Paris, ORSTOM, pp. 75-94 (Coll. Colloques et Séminaires).
Roquebain Charles, 1937 – A travers le Fouta Djallon. Revue de Géographie Alpine, Grenoble, XXV (1), pp. 545-581.
Rossi Georges, 1998 – Une relecture de l’érosion tropicale. Annales de Géographie, Paris, n°101, pp. 318-329.
Sudres A., 1947 – La dégradation des sols au Foutah Djalon. L’agronomie tropicale, Paris, volume II, n° 5-6, pp. 227-246.
Suret-Canale, Jean
1970 – La République de Guinée, Paris, Editions sociales, 432 p.
1969 – Les origines ethniques des anciens captifs au Fouta-Djalon. Notes Africaines, Dakar, 123, pp. 91-92.
Vieillard Gilbert, 1940 – Notes sur les Peuls du Fouta-Djallon. Bulletin de l’IFAN, Dakar, tome II, n°1-2, p. 83-210
Vissac B. et Hentgen A., 1980 – Eléments pour une problématique de recherche sur les systèmes agraires et le développement. Paris, INRA (S.A.D.).
Vogel Jean
1990 – Etude sur l’amélioration des sols à fonio des plaines de Timbis. Pita, Projet de développement agricole de Timbi-Madina, 53 p. + annexes.
1993 – Des paysans qui connaissent leur affaire. Lettre du réseau Recherche- Développement, 17 février, 2 p.

Notes
1.- Andre V., 2002 et Pestaña G. (thèse en cours de réalisation).
2.- «La forêt sèche couvrait autrefois l’ensemble du Fouta Djalon, mais elle a été presque complètement détruite par les incendies et par le pâturage, à l’exception de quelques petites superficies près de la Guinée-Bissau et du Sénégal.» B. Hasson, 1998, p.18.
3.- « Plus particulièrement on note : une forte densité de population dans le Fouta-Djallon, parfois jusqu’à 140 hab./km2; la pression foncière qui en résulte et la conséquente réduction du temps de jachère qui est à l’origine de l’appauvrissement des sols ; l’extension des terres cultivées, au détriment des surfaces forestières et pastorales. ». F.A.O., 1992, pp.7-8.
4.- « La forêt dense sèche ou ce qu’il en reste ne présente plus qu’une mosaïque de reliques dispersées. […]elle a subi une très forte pression et de ce fait elle est menacée d’une disparition rapide. » F.A.O., 1992, p. 29.
5.- « Incontestablement les feux de brousse supportent, à l’heure actuelle, la majeure part des responsabilités. La dénudation des pentes, aussi faibles soient-elles, laisse le sol nu, exposé aux averses. Le pâturage excessif ne permet pas la reconstitution d’une végétation qui s’appauvrit en quantité et en qualité. Les sentiers suivis par les troupeaux préparent les chemins que l’eau empruntera ; le pullulement des chèvres (l’autre grand ennemi des sols) est à l’origine de la mutilation des jeunes pousses… enfin, le surpeuplement humain exacerbe tous ces facteurs destructifs dont la virulence ne connaît plus de limites. » J. Pouquet, 1956, p.9.
6.- « En résumé, le massif du Fouta – Djalon, véritable château d’eau de la sous-région de l’Afrique de l’Ouest est, du fait de sa charge démographique et des pressions d’origines diverses sur un milieu naturel fragile, menacé par un processus de désertification… ». O.U.A., 1981, p.4.
7.- « Le grignotage des terres s’accuse de jour en jour.[…] Les bowals, stricto sensu, progressent vertigineusement ». J. Pouquet, 1956, p.244.
8.- « D’une manière générale, les systèmes (sous-systèmes) de culture et d’élevage sont assez similaires d’une région à l’autre du Fouta – Djalon.». Detraux M., 1992, pp. 23.
9.- Pour simplifier le propos, le terme de campagne sera préféré à celui de “souspréfecture” trop peu géographique, à celui “d’espace rural” trop vague, enfin à celui de “pays” à la signification précise et adaptée mais malheureusement trop peu usité pour être parlant.
10.- NDantari : sol ferrallitique limoneux ou sablo-limoneux, ocre ou beige, très lessivé, perméable et battant, très acide, localisé sur les faibles pentes et les surfaces subordonnants, chimiquement pauvre.
Hollaande : souvent associé au dantari, il se rencontre dans de légères dépressions (teinte grise) ; sol colluvial, limoneux ou argilo-limoneux, peu structuré et à hydromorphie temporaire, extrêmement acide.
11.- HansaNHere : sol caillouteux composé de matériaux hétérogènes résultant de l’altération de roches dures et du démantèlement des cuirasses. Localisé sur des versants à forte pente ( plus de 12%), ce sol ferrallitique rouge, souvent épais, meuble, bien structuré et filtrant offre une certaine fertilité chimique.
12.- « Du point de vue de l’altitude on peut le diviser en deux parties : les hauts plateaux, une région de plus de 10 000 km2 se trouvant pour la plupart au-dessus de 800 m, et comprenant les villes de Dalaba, Pita, Labé et Mali ; la région environnante se trouvant pour la plupart au-dessous de 800 m. ». I. Langdale-Brown, 1961-1962.

Are Fulɓe Disappearing? And Is Adlam Their Savior?

The answer to the questions in this blog’s title is flatly and emphatically No! First, Fulɓe are not about to disappear, because they are one Africa’s most distributed and populous nations. Second and consequently, the “new” Adlam alphabet cannot be their rescuer. Yet, entitled “The Alphabet That Will Save a People From Disappearing,” a paper published in The Atlantic Magazine presents Adlam as the would-be-savior of the Fulbe/Halpular Civilization. I could not disagree more and object stronger.

Kaveh Waddell, The Atlantic Magazine
Kaveh Waddell, The Atlantic Magazine

But I congratulate the Barry brothers for getting a write-up on Adlam in The Atlantic, a major US publication. Unfortunately, the author of the article, Kaveh Waddell, focuses on the digital technology aspects of Adlam (Unicode, Social media, computers, operating systems, mobile devices, etc.) And he does so at the expense of the history and culture of the Fulɓe (See also Fulɓe and Africa). Such a glaring omission defeats the very —and curious—idea of Adlam coming to save Fulɓe/Halpular populations from disappearing!

Before outlining some of the many points of contention, and for the sake of clarity, I should sum up my experience, which spans +40 years of teaching, research, and publishing on the Fulɓe and their  language. I majored in linguistics and African languages, and graduated from the Polytechnic Institute G. A. Nasser of Conakry, Social Sciences Department, Class of 1972 (Kwame Nkrumah). I then taught linguistics and Pular there for 10 years (1972-1982). And I concurrently chaired (from 1973 to 1978) the Pular Commission at Guinea’s Académie des Langues nationales. With my deputy —and esteemed elder—, the late Elhadj Mamadou Gangue, I did field research in the Fuuta-Jalon, inventorying dialects, meeting literati and artists, collecting data.… In 1978, President Sékou Touré sent an original visitor, Adam Bâ, to the Academy. A Pullo from Benin, Mr. Bâ wanted to offer his new Pular alphabet. In addition to the letters, he also had invented a new vocabulary for greetings, leave-takings, titles, ranking, trade, etc. In a nutshell, he was—seriously—asking us to learn a new version of our mother tongue! After listening to his pitch and debating the worthiness of his proposal, we filed back an inadmissibility (fin de non-recevoir) report to the authority.
In 1982 I won a competitive Fulbright-Hayes fellowship and came to the University of Texas at Austin as a Visiting Scholar. My selection rested mainly on my sociolinguistics essay in which I laid out a blueprint for the study of esthetic discourse and verbal art performance in Fuuta-Jalon. I focused on three communities of speech-makers: the Nyamakala (popular troubadours), the caste of Awluɓe (or griots, i.e. court historians and royal counselors) and the Cernooɓe (Muslim scholars, masters of the ajami literature).

That said, here are some of my disagreements and objections from the article.

Students learn to read and write Adlam in a classroom in Sierra Leone (Courtesy of Ibrahima and Abdoulaye Barry)
Students learn to read and write Adlam in a classroom in Sierra Leone (Courtesy of Ibrahima and Abdoulaye Barry)
  1. The title of the paper vastly misrepresents the situation of the Fulbe/Halpular peoples. Indeed, those populations —who number in tens of millions— are in no danger of vanishing at all. Therefore, there is no ground for the journalist to claim that Adlam alphabet will rescue the Fulɓe from a hypothetical oblivion. After all, they are one of Africa’s most ancient and dynamic people. Again, to the best of my knowledge the Fulɓe/Halpular do not face an existential threat or the probability of extinction!
  2. The article refers to the Arabic alphabet 11 times. But it doesn’t say anything about the Pular/Fulfulde Ajamiyya traditional alphabet. Yet, the founders of that writing system achieved significant successes in spreading literacy and educating the faithful, from Mauritania and Fuuta-Tooro, on the Atlantic Coast, to Cameroon, in Central Africa, with Fuuta-Bundu, Fuuta-Jalon, Maasina, Sokoto, etc. in between. They developed an important literary corpus and left an impressive intellectual legacy. Some of the brilliant ajamiyya authors include Tierno Muhammadu Samba Mombeya (Fuuta-Jalon), Usmaan ɓii Fooduye (aka Uthman dan Fodio) founder of the Sokoto Empire, Sheyku Ahmadu Bari, founder of the Diina of Maasina, Amadou Hampâté Bâ, etc.

For a partial anthology see  La Femme. La Vache. La Foi. Ecrivains et Poètes du Fuuta-Jalon

3. Ajamyiyya had the backing of the ruling aristocracy in theocentric Fuuta-Jalon (1725-1897). Moreover, it conveys the dogmas, teachings and writings of Classical Arabic in a deeply religious society. That’s why individuals were motivated to write in their language. They acknowledged what Tierno Samba Mombeya famously summarized in the Hunorde (Introduction) of his landmark poem “Oogirde Malal” (circa 1785):

Sabu neddo ko haala mu'un newotoo Nde o fahminiree ko wi'aa to yial.

Miɗo jantora himmude haala pular I compose in the Pular language
Ka no newnane fahmu nanir jaɓugol. To let you understand and accept the Truth.
Sabu neɗɗo ko haala mu’un newotoo Because  the mother tongue helps one best
Nde o fahminiree ko wi’aa to ƴial. As they try to understand what is said in the Essence.

How has History rewarded Tierno Samba and the pantheon of ajamiyya scholars? Alfâ Ibrâhîm Sow has best captured their invaluable contribution. He wrote:

« If, one hundred-fifty years following its composition, the Lode of Eternal Bliss (Oogirde Malal) continues to move readers of our country, it’s chiefly because of the literacy vocation it bestows on Pular-Fulfulde, because of its balanced, sure and elegant versification, its healthy, erudite and subtle language, and the national will of cultural assertion that it embodies as well as the desire for linguistic autonomy and dignity that it expresses. »

4. “Why do Fulani people not have their own writing system?” M. Barry wondered. Actually, they do have it with Ajamiyya. By applying their curiosity and creativity they first reverse-engineered the Arabic alphabet by filling the gaps found the original Arabic graphic system. Then they took care of giving the letters descriptive and easy-to-remember Pular names. That didactic and mnemonic strategy facilitated the schooling of children.

5. Again, it is amazing that age 14 and 10 respectively, in 1990, Ibrahima and Abdoulaye Barry began to devise an alphabet. But it was a bit late for many reasons. I’ll mention only two:
Primo. Back in 1966  UNESCO organized a conference of Experts (linguists, teachers, researchers) for Africa’s major languages in Bamako (Mali). Pular/Fulfulde ranks in the top ten group of African idioms. The proceedings from the deliberations yielded, among similar results for other languages, the Standard Alphabet of Pular/Fulfulde. Ever since, that system has gained currency and is used the world around. It covers all aspects of the language’s phonology, including the following consonants, —which are typical and frequent, but not exclusive to Pular/Fulfulde:

  • ɓ,  example ɓiɓɓe (children), ɓiɗɗo (child)
  • ɗ, example ɗiɗo (two, for people), ɗiɗi (two for animals or objects)
  • ƴ, example ƴiiƴan (blood)
  • ŋ, example ŋeeŋeeru (violin)

The respective decimal Unicode equivalents for the above letters are:

  • ɓ
  • ɗ
  • ƴ
  • ŋ

All modern text editors and browsers are programmed to automatically convert those four codes into the aforementioned Pular/Fulfulde letters.

As a Drupal site builder and content architect, it happened that I filed last night an issue ticket on the Platform’s main website. In it I requested  that —just like in Drupal v. 7— Fulah (Pular/Fulfulde) be reinstated among the  options on the Language Regionalization menu. So far the latest version of Drupal (v. 8) does not include it.

Secundo. Launched as an experiment in 1969, the Internet was 21 years old when Adlam got started in 1990. Ever since, the Digital Revolution has moved to integrate Unicode, which today provides covers all the world’s languages.

6. In 1977, as linguistics faculty at the Social sciences department of the Polytechnic Institute of Conakry, I attended the event. The speaker was none but the late Souleymane Kanté, the inventor of N’Ko. But today —forty-years later— and despite all efforts, the Nko  is still struggling. It is far from delivering its initial promises of  renaissance of the Mande culture area.
President Alpha Condé’s electoral campaign promises to support the N’Ko have been apparently forgotten. And President Ibrahim Boubacar Keita of Mali doesn’t seem to even pay attention to the N’Ko. Is it because he prides himself of being a French literature expert?

Conclusion?

No! There is no end to any debate on language, literature, culture. An alphabet is not a gauge of cultural and linguistic development. Let’s not forget that both literacy (letters) and numeracy (numbers) are required for scientific research, administration, shopping, etc. Consequently,  the emphasis on creating new alphabets is, in my view, outmoded. It is sometimes more economical to just borrow from either near or far. Western Europe did just that with the Arabic numbering system. And in this 21st century, Unicode meets all —or most— written communication needs. Luckily, Pular/Fulfulde has been endowed with a Standard Alphabet since 1966. Let’s use it and let’s not try to reinvent the wheel.

Tierno S. Bah

The Trial of Mamadou Dia, Dakar 1963. Part I

Senegalese paratroopers guarding the street leading to the Palace of Justice during the trial of Mamadou Dia. Dakar, december 1962. (Photos courtesy Dakar-Matin, Senegalese Ministry of Information, and Photo Bracher, Dakar) — BlogGuinée
Senegalese paratroopers guarding the street leading to the Palace of Justice during the trial of Mamadou Dia. Dakar, december 1962. (Photos courtesy Dakar-Matin, Senegalese Ministry of Information, and Photo Bracher, Dakar) — BlogGuinée

Whereas the coups d’etat plague affected the African political landscape for decades, Senegal has avoided state takeover and government downfall, whether military-staged or civilian-led. As a result, it has gained the reputation of a beacon of democracy on the continent. However, the republic of Senegal was not immune from the domination of single-party rule.  Indeed, the Parti démocratique sénégalais (PDS) remained firmly in control, again, for decades, despite challenges from opponents like Abdoulaye Wade. Worse, in 1960 (the collapse of the Mali Federation), and in 1962 —discussed here—, the political class experienced deep, but non-violent crises. In the second case, irreconcilable differences broke out between the three main political leaders: National Assembly President Lamine Guèye, President Leopold Sedar Senghor, Prime minister Mamadou Dia. The dissensions led to the arrest and trial of Prime minister Mamadou Dia along with three of his cabinet members (Valdiodio Ndiaye, Ibrahima Sarr, Alioune Tall), on charges of attempting a coup d’état. The late American anthropologist and political scientist, Victor Du Bois, was present at the trial. He gives us a first-hand account of the court’s proceedings. In the end the Haute Cour de Justice convicted and sentenced Mamadou Dia and his three co-accused to heavy prison terms.

Read also The Emergence of Black Politics in Senegal: 1900-1920

Tierno S. Bah


Victor D. Du Bois
The Trial of Mamadou Dia. Part I: Background of the Case.

American Universities Field Staff Reports. West Africa Series, Vol. VI No. 6 (Senegal), pp. 1-8

Dakar, July 1963

On May 7, 1963, the trial of Mamadou Dia opened in Dakar.
The former premier of Senegal and four of his ministers were being tried on charges arising from an attempted coup d’état last December 17. On this day the Avenue Pasteur leading to Dakar’s starkly modern Palace of Justice was crowded with chattering, gesticulating Senegalese making their way in small groups up the sun-drenched street. Lines of cars, sleek Citroëns and Mercedes, crawled toward the waiting soldiers who guarded all approaches to the building. Cars with the “CD” plates of the diplomatic corps were waved through; the others were stopped until their occupants produced the red invitation cards to show that they, too, had been invited to witness the drama which was to unfold that day.

For the foreign observer, already cynical about the quality of African justice, the sight of hundreds of soldiers with Tommy guns slung over their shoulders was not reassuring. Their presence seemed to detract from the claims of the Senegalese government that this would be an open and impartial trial worthy of a free democracy.

Running the gantlet of troops that lined the corridor to the courtroom, visitors were asked again and again to show their red cards. The final test came at the door of the courtroom itself, where a Senegalese lieutenant scrutinized each arrival’s credentials.

Inside, the situation was a little better. The 50-odd soldiers, grouped in a solid phalanx at the rear of the chamber, somehow did not seem quite so conspicuous. On one side of the long rectangular room-where the jury would sit in an American court- were members of the press, a majority of them foreigners. Opposite sat representatives of the diplomatie corps. In the middle were about 40 rows of seats for the witnesses and for grave-faced functionaries who were important enough to have been invited to the trial.

At the head of the courtroom, well elevated, stood a horseshoe shaped table of polished mahogany behind which were high-backed leather chairs for the judges. Sorne five yards in front of the judges’ table stood the symbolic bar of justice; behind it were the benches for the accused; and behind them, were desks from which the defense attorneys would plead their case. Far to the rear of the room, back of the soldiers , crowded two hundred or so ordinary citizens of Senegal.

It was strange to see Mamadou Dia sitting on the prisoner’s bench. It was difficult to believe that this man who had been a leader in Senegalese politics for the last 14 years and had held the second highest office in the land was on trial for an attempted coup d’état.

How did it happen and why? Origins of the Conflict

The reasons are as complex as Senegalese politics itself. Vested financial interests, local power rivalries, and entrenched privilege all played a part. The conflict, at least initially, was not so much between Dia and President Léopold Senghor as between persons lower on the political scale—men who used Dia and Senghor as shields behind which to fight their private battles and to defend their own interests.

Central to the conflict was Dia’s plan for the gradual socialization of the economy and the institution of reforms in the social sector. Both programs threatened established interests. A more immediate cause, however, was the growing estrangement over the past year between members of Mamadou Dia’s govemment and certain deputies in the National Assembly who were critical of Dia’s policies. This estrangement reflected a deeper crisis: the alienation of party from parliament.
Although in theory Senegal is a multiparty state, in fact the ruling Union Progressiste Sénégalaise (UPS) holds such preponderance of authority that it is the only real power in the land.
Of the 80 seats in the National Assembly, the UPS controls 79.
The deputies to the Assembly are nominated by the party and as such are theoretically its agents in parliament. However, many of the present deputies are men of substance whose positions of prominence date back to the colonial period. These men feel relatively little obligation toward their party. They feel even less obligation toward the younger party militants, who today occupy many positions of authority in the party’s lower echelons and who are eagerly waiting to replace them in their jobs .

These younger rnembers of the UPS are the most dynamic element in the party. They are also the group most desirous of pushing the economie and social changes in the direction envisioned by Mamadou Dia. The parliamentarians, on the other hand, are allied with the conservative interests in the country: the urban bourgeoisie, the European business community, the Marabouts (Muslim religious leaders), and local oligarchs. Many, with important financial intere sts in the sale and transport of peanuts (Senegal’s principal crop), have much to gain from keeping economie and social conditions as they are now. Viewing any change with misgiving, they have tended to act as a brake on the socialist programs advocated by Dia and by the younger party militants.

Differences between party and parliament were evidenced by their taking opposite sides on the issue of socialisrn and on the role to be accorded private enterprise . These differences were also manifested in frequent and sometimes bitter struggles in regional politics and over political appointments at every level. Each side sought to reinforce its standing by placing as many of its own men as possible in positions of power.

Aware of the dissension within the party, President Senghor tried to mediate between the two sides. But his role as arbiter was impossible to maintain, for neither side was willing to accept it. Senghor’s own position was ambivalent. Though sympathetic with Dia and his aims, he was impatient with Dia’s reluctance to stamp out corruption in high places, particularly among some of his own ministers.
Moreover, Dia’s attempts to curb the influence of the powerful Marabouts threatened to jeopardize the President’s own cordial relations with this important element of his political support.

Thus dragged into the controversy, the President unwittingly became the symbol of the anti-Dia forces. Although he had not summoned them, around him rallied all the conservative elements in the nation. Against the wishes of both opponents, it became a contest of Dia vs. Senghor .

Prelude to the Attempted Coup d’État

The National Council, highest organ of the UPS met at Rufisque on October 21, 1962. Several days before, rumors of an open rift between President Léopold Senghor and Prime Minister Mamadou Dia had circulated widely, but a communiqué issued at the end of that meeting categorically denied any such rift. A certain malaise was nevertheless felt to exist within the ranks of the party, and it was decided that special delegations should be sent to various subsections of the UPS to allay it.

On November 12, 1962, Mamadou Dia reorganized his government. The most important innovation was his assumption of the Ministries of Defense and Security.

  • Valdiodio N’Diaye, former Minister of the Interior, became head of Finance
  • Ibrahima Sarr, former Minister of Public Functions, became Minister of Development
  • Joseph M’Baye, former Minister of Rural Economy, replaced Alioune Tall as Minister of Commerce
  • Tall was named Minister of Information.

On December 14, 1962, the real crisis began. On the afternoon of that day, Théophile James, a deputy, deposited with Lamine Gueye, President of the National Assembly, a motion of censure against the Dia government signed by himself and 40 of his colleagues. Accompanying the motion was a statement by the deputies denouncing the “fetters to the free exercise of parliamentary prerogatives” which, they claimed, the Dia government had fastened on the Assembly. They declared that the “state of emergency law,” which had been in force in Senegal since the breakup of the Mali Federation in order to better assure national solidarity, had become an excuse for suspending the provisions and defeating the purposes of the Constitution and “an instrument of blind repression.” The signatories where therefore withdrawing their support from the government.

Because of the impending governmental crisis, an extraordinary meeting of the Council of Ministers was called on Saturday, December 15, 1962, to discuss the impasse between the government and the Assembly. But no solution was found acceptable to both sides. The cabinet itself was split over whether, in view of the state of emergency still legally existing in the country, the deputies had the right to file a censure motion at all. Part of the cabinet supported Prime Minister Dia’s view that the deputies could not do so; the rest of the cabinet sided with the Assembly, arguing that they could. Because it was impossible to reach agreement, Prime Minister Dia suggested to President Senghor that the Supreme Court be asked to decide the issue. Senghor rejected this proposal.

The next day (December 16, 1962), the party’s Political Bureau (the UPS’s highest executive body) met in an effort to resolve the crisis. But again no compromise was reached between the Dia government and the parliamentary group sponsoring the censure motion. It was decided, therefore, to convoke a special meeting of the 300-member National Council of the UPS at Rufisque on December 20 to settle the issue. In the meantime, the Political Bureau ordered the deputies to withdraw their censure motion, and President Senghor, approving the Political Bureau’s decision, personally appealed to certain influential deputies to withdraw their signatures. The deputies, however, fearing that they would not be backed by the National Council, yet equally certain that they could carry the censure motion in the Assembly, refused to obey the Political Bureau’s orders.

The Events of December 17, 1962

At 9:30a.m. on December 17, the heads of the various commissions of the National Assembly met to set the hour at which the Assembly should convene to consider the censure motion. At this meeting the Dia government was represented by lbrahima Sarr, Minister of Development. It was decided that at 10:00 a.m. there should be a meeting of the Political Bureau of the UPS and the parliamentary group sponsoring the censure motion.

10:00 a.m. First Mamadou Dia, then President Senghor arrived at the National Assembly for the proposed meeting. Dia explained briefly to Senghor that he saw no point in remaining, since the deputies had already decided to disregard the Political Bureau’s orders and proceed with their deposition of the censure motion. Dia then left; President Senghor himself departed a few minutes later.

Shortly thereafter gendarmes and police arrived and ordered the heads of the parliamentary commissions to leave the building. Lamine Gueye, President of the National Assembly, insisted that the parliamentarians’ debate should not be disturbed, but his protest was disregarded. Again the deputies were ordered to evacuate the Assembly at once. In the meantime the building had been surrounded by gendarmes, presumably taking orders from Dia. As the deputies filed out of the building, four of them, including Fofana Abdoulaye, a former minister, Ousmane N’Gom, Vice-President of the Assembly, and two others active in pressing for the censure motion, were arrested and taken to central police headquarters . The other deputies followed Lamine Gueye to his home near the President’s palace. Once there, Lamine Gueye, as President of the Assembly, dispatched a message to the President of the Republic reporting what had taken place. He asked the President, as “guardian of the Constitution,” to authorize the Assembly to hold an extraordinary session in his house to consider the censure motion.

Meanwhile, Dia forces had taken control of Radio Senegal and of the Administration Building, seat of the national government.

10:00 a.m.-12:00 a.m. President Senghor, forced now to choose between backing Dia and supporting the Assembly, decided on the latter course. He authorized the Assembly to meet at Lamine Gueye’s house. He also issued a requisition order, assuming direct command of the nation’s armed forces. A company of parachutists stationed at Rufisque was summoned to Dakar to protect the President’s palace.

1:00 p.m. Prime Minister Mamadou Dia at this time seemed still to have the upper hand. The Dakar police and gendarmerie had put themselves under his orders . Even the Senegalese Chief of Staff, General Fall, declared that he would respect Dia’s authority as Minister of Defense (in effect, disregarding the President’s requisition order).
Alioune Tall, Minister of Information (and a Dia supporter), announced over Radio Senegal that measures had been taken in agreement with the Secretary-General of the UPS (i.e., President Senghor) to prevent certain deputies (signers of the censure motion) from subverting the government. Tall promised that at eight o’clock that evening, the Prime Minister would address the nation.

The parachutists from Rufisque had now arrived in Dakar and surrounded the presidential palace, displacing the police and gendarmes previously sent there by Dia. It was announced shortly afterward that General Fall had been stripped of his command and replaced by Colonel Alfred Diallo, chief of the parachutists. By this time Dia and his ministers had barricaded themselves on the ninth floor of the Administration Building. Outside, Dia’s gendarmes continued to mount guard.

By 3:00 p.m. the Administration Building was surrounded by parachutists under the command of Colonel Diallo. Both the gendarmes and the parachutists, anxious to avoid bloodshed, held their fire. Left to themselves while their officers conferred over the situation, the troops within a remarkably short time were smiling, snapping their fingers, and patting each other on the back.

At 5:00p.m. the deputies convened at the house of Lamine Gueye. Some 40 members of the National Assembly were present, among them five ministers who had chosen to resign from the Dia government rather than follow him. All those present, including Boubakar Gueye, sole deputy of the opposition Bloc des Masses Sénégalaises (BMS), voted in favor of the censure motion, which was carried. The Assembly then proposed to authorize the President to submit a constitutional amendment to popular referendum. The amendment would do away with the office of prime minister and establish a presidential regime. This proposal was unanimously approved and President Senghor was immediately notified of the Assembly’s action.

At this moment it was announced to the deputies that parachutists had surrounded Radio Senegal in Dakar. In the meantime the radio station at Rufisque had passed into the hands of President Senghor’s paratroopers. Under orders from Joseph M’Baye, Dia’s Minister of Commerce, all telephone lines leading from the President’s palace were cut. Senghor, fearing that the direct confrontation of the opposing forces might lead to bloodshed, ordered the paratroopers to withdraw from the Administration Building, where Dia and his ministers still remained barricaded.

At 8:00 p .m. President Senghor attempted to address the nation. After a few minutes his voice was cut off the air and that of Mamadou Dia was heard. Then Dia, too, was cut off. It was evident that within Radio Senegal itself there were partisans of both sides.

By 3:00 a.m. of the following day (December 18, 1962), the entire capital had learned of the Assembly’s vote and of Colonel Diallo’s appointment as commander of all forces in the Dakar-Rufisque area. It was now clear that the coup d’état had no chance of success. Accordingly, the chiefs of the gendarmerie and of the Dakar police went to the President’s palace and placed themselves under his direct orders. Mamadou Dia, abandoned by the few forces that earlier had supported him, left the Administration Building. With the four ministers still loyal to him, he returned to his home in the Medina. Throughout the early hours of the morning, Radio Senegal, now firmly held by Senghor forces, broadcast the full text of the President’s earlier message.

At 9:00a.m. the deputies returned to the National Assembly Building, which was restored to them. Now numbering 55, they voted unanimously in favor of the amendment, filed with the Assembly the previous day, which would abolish the office of prime minister. They also granted Mr. Senghor full powers to govern the country pending the change-over to a presidential form of government.

That afternoon President Senghor broadcast from his palace an appeal to the Senegalese people to maintain their national unity. In the evening, a detachment of paratroopers went to Mamadou Dia’s house in the Medina with an order for his arrest issued by the High Court of Justice . Warrants were also issued for the arrest of the four ministers who had stuck by Dia. When Mr. Dia heard that the warrant for his arrest had been signed by Doudou Thiam, his former Minister of Justice, he at first told the arresting officer that he refused to follow him. But Mr. Tall, Dia’s Minister of Information, pleaded for a moment to talk with the Prime Minister. He succeeded in convincing Dia that further resistance was futile and that he owed it to his people and his friends to go along peaceably. The Prime Minister consented, thus averting a possible tragedy, and the five men were taken to a private villa where they were put under guard. Mamadou Dia’s contest of power with the National Assembly had failed.

Next, The Trial of Mamadou Dia. Part II: The Proceedings in Court, May 7, 1963

The Trial of Mamadou Dia, Dakar 1963. Part II

From left to right, former Prime minister Mamadou Dia and Ibrahima Sarr, his former Minister of Development and a co-defendant at their trial by the Haute Cour de Justice. Dakar, 1963. (Photos courtesy Dakar-Matin, Senegalese Ministry of Information, and Photo Bracher, Dakar) — BlogGuinée.
From left to right, former Prime minister Mamadou Dia and Ibrahima Sarr, his former Minister of Development and a co-defendant at their trial by the Haute Cour de Justice. Dakar, 1963. (Photos courtesy Dakar-Matin, Senegalese Ministry of Information, and Photo Bracher, Dakar) — BlogGuinée.

As explained in the previous article, Senegal’s political class was unable or unwilling to settle their differences within the legal framework. Back then, in December 1962, the country was still ruled by emergency laws stemming from the collapse of the Mali Federation in 1960. In a winner-take-all struglle for power, two rival camps faced each other. On one side stood the president of the republic,  Leopold Sedar Senghor, backed by the president of the National Assembly, Lamine Guèye. The  rival camp was headed by the Prime minister, Mamadou Dia. He lost his case and was arrested. Accused of plotting a coup d’état, he stood trial—along with his four co-defendants— before the High Court of Justice in May 1963. This paper continues the series of three articles published by Victor Du Bois, who attended the hearing.

Read also The Trial of Mamadou Dia. Part I: Background of the Case.

Tierno S. Bah


Victor D. Du Bois
The Trial of Mamadou Dia. Part II: The Proceedings in Court, May 7, 1963.

American Universities Field Staff Reports.
West Africa Series, Vol. VI No. 7 (Senegal), pp. 1-13

Dakar, July 1963

At nine o’clock in the morning on May 7, 1963, the trial of the former Senegalese prime minister, Mamadou Dia, got under way. The defendants were Dia and Ibrahima Sarr, Valdiodio N’Diaye, Joseph M’Baye, and Alioune Tall, former Ministers of Development, Finance, Commerce, and Information respectively in the Dia government.

A command barked out by a sergeant at arms called the soldiers in the courtroom to attention. The audience stood as the judges of the High Court entered the chamber.

Of the seven men sitting as judges only one, Ousmane Goundiam, a member of the Senegalese Supreme Court, who presided, was a magistrate. The others were deputies designated by the National Assembly to serve as judges in the present trial.

The state’s case was argued by a specially appointed procureur général, Ousmane Camara. Dia and the other accused were defended by French attorneys, who flew in from Paris, and by three Senegalese, among them, Abdoulaye Wade, the brilliant head of legal studies at the University of Dakar.

Three of Dia's codefendants: from left to right, Valdiodio N'Diaye, Alioune Tall, and Joseph M'Baye, respectively former Ministers of Finance, Information, and Commerce in the Dia government. Behind them are seen four of the French attorneys for the defense. (Photos courtesy Dakar-Matin, Senegalese Ministry of Information, and Photo Bracher, Dakar) — BlogGuinée.
Three of Dia’s co-defendants: from left to right, Valdiodio N’Diaye, Alioune Tall, and Joseph M’Baye, respectively former Ministers of Finance, Information, and Commerce in the Dia government. Behind them are seen four of the French attorneys for the defense. (Photos courtesy Dakar-Matin, Senegalese Ministry of Information, and Photo Bracher, Dakar) — BlogGuinée.

The Case for the Prosecution

The charges against Mamadou Dia were seven:

  1. That he had ordered the expulsion of the deputies from the National Assembly Building
  2. That he had ordered the arrest of four deputies without legitimate cause or warrant
  3. That he had had the telephone lines to the President’s palace cut to prevent the President’s fulfilling his constitutional functions
  4. That he had ordered an attack on the President’s palace
  5. That he had sought to raise an armed band
  6. That he had assumed unauthorized command of the armed forces against legitimate authority and in disregard of a requisition order signed by the President under Article 24 of the Senegalese Constitution 1 and
  7. That he had perpetrated acts against the liberty of individual citizens.

Two separate but related issues, crucial to the substance of the charges, occupied the attention of the prosecution during the trial. The first concerned Mamadou Dia’s violation of the Constitution; the second, the thorny issue of party-government relations. Ultimately, the latter reduced itself to the basic question: “Which was the higher authority in the land—the party or the Constitution ?”

The prosecution’s position on the first issue, namely Mamadou Dia’s violation of the Constitution, was quite clear. In ordering the expulsion of the deputies from the Assembly, arresting four of their members, and cutting off telephone communication with the President’s palace, Dia had exceeded the limits of his constitutional authority and had trampled on the rights of parliament. His isolation of the palace clearly impeded President Léopold Senghor‘s exercise of his constitutional functions.

To the prosecution, Dia’s countermanding of President Senghor’s order requisitioning the nation’s armed forces and his issuance of another requisition order, placing the nation’s armed forces under his own command, constituted usurpation of presidential prerogative and illegal assumption of military authority. Furthermore, Dia’s continued exercise of command over the gendarmerie and the Dakar police force, even after his government had been officially overthrown by the Assembly’s vote of censure, amounted to raising an armed band against legitimate state authority (i.e., the President).

The charge of perpetrating arbitrary acts against the liberty of individual citizens was based on Dia’s arrest of the four deputies and the detention by his followers of the head of the central telephone exchange, an action taken to facilitate isolation of the President’s palace.

Much more complex was the second issue, whether the party or the Constitution was the higher authority in the land. Yet this issue had to be raised by the prosecution, for the defense’s entire case rested on the claim that Dia’s actions were both legitimate and understandable in the light of the doctrine of party supremacy supposedly in force at that time in Senegal.

The prosecutor challenged the validity of this doctrine. He did not hesitate to point out that the Senegalese Constitution nowhere spoke of the party, much less accorded it the supremacy now imputed to it. What was more, the rules of the UPS themselves did not claim for the party a position superior to that of the nation’s Constitution. “How can you claim that any law or doctrine can be put above the Constitution, the source of all legality in the country?” he asked the defense. The point was difficult to refute.

The prosecutor emphasized that although deputies are in theory agents of the party, inasmuch as it is the party which names their candidacy, they also as deputies have obligations to the Constitution. “The question,” he said, “adds up to this: ‘Does one have the right to violate the Constitution if one has permission from the party?’ Or, looked at another way: ‘Can deputies respect the Constitution without the express permission from the UPS ?‘” “If the party is really supreme,” he inquired, “why is it that it did not change the Constitution and specifically make the state and the party a single entity? Since it did not change the Constitution, the party should now respect it.” Insistently, the prosecutor contended that the Senegalese Constitution could not be changed at will to suit the particular circumstances of the moment. It must be accorded a genuine inviolability.

The High Court of Justice which judged Mamadou Dia. Seated at the center of the judges' table is Ousmane Goundiam, President of the High Court; to his immediate right, Théophile James, the deputy who authored the vote of censure against the Dia government. Dakar 1963. (Photos courtesy Dakar-Matin, Senegalese Ministry of Information, and Photo Bracher, Dakar.) — BlogGuinée
The High Court of Justice which judged Mamadou Dia. Seated at the center of the judges’ table is Ousmane Goundiam, President of the High Court; to his immediate right, Théophile James, the deputy who authored the vote of censure against the Dia government. Dakar 1963. (Photos courtesy Dakar-Matin, Senegalese Ministry of Information, and Photo Bracher, Dakar.) — BlogGuinée

The Defense’s Reply

The defense’s reply to the prosecution’s charges rested mainly on the assertion that Mamadou Dia had not attempted a coup d’état. His actions had been warranted by the political tensions at the time. They were “conservation measures” (“mesures conservatoires”) aimed solely at preserving the status quo until the party’s National Council should have an opportunity to express its judgment at the Rufisque meeting scheduled for December 20, 1962. Mamadou Dia emphasized that it was he, not Senghor, who had asked for the meeting of the National Council.
“Had the Council backed the deputies who wanted to present the censure motion,” he said, “I would immediately have tendered the resignation of my government.” On such a crucial question, he insisted, the party had a right to express its view; and the deputies, as its agents, had an obligation to respect it. But the deputies were unwilling to wait for the Rufisque meeting. They refused to withdraw their censure motion even after the party’s Political Bureau had asked them to do so. lt was this obstinate refusal on their part to acknowledge the primacy of the party and submit to its discipline that prompted him (Dia) to have the deputies expelled from the Assembly. His only intention was to prevent them from filing a motion of censure until the party had had a chance to discuss the matter.

The defense further contended that the deputies had no legal right to file a censure motion because Senegal technically was still in a state of emergency and governed by emergency laws in force at the time, under which no motion of censure of the existing government could be proposed. Under the same emergency laws, the defense continued, the Prime Minister had the legal authority to arrest anyone suspected of subversion against the state, even deputies and other officers of the national government. And Mamadou Dia’s testimony before the court indicated that subversion was what he saw in the deputies’ censure motion:

Yes, I took certain measures once I was informed of the development of the political situation. When I heard that the censure motion was about to be taken in abnormal conditions, I found myself confronted with a plot directed against the government. It appeared to some persons to be absolutely necessary to change this regime. The plot was directed more against our institutions than against our government. This plot was aimed at destroying the party. It was organized subversion.

Dia declared that once it had become clear to him that President Senghor would side with the deputies on the question of the propriety of the censure motion during a state of emergency, he had requested the Supreme Court to rule on the legality of this motion. But the President refused to refer the matter to the Court, even though the Senegalese Constitution specifically provided for such arbitration in cases of conflict between the government and the Assembly 2. According to Dia, Senghor preferred instead to have the party’s National Council decide the question at the Rufisque meeting. Thus, it was the President and not he who had violated the Constitution.

The defense insisted, moreover, that the testimony of the witnesses indicated that President Senghor had requisitioned the paratroopers from Rufisque before 10:00 a.m. on December 17, that is, before the deputies had even been expelled from the Assembly. Under the Constitution then in force, it was the Prime Minister as chief executive who was responsible for the armed forces, especially since Mr. Dia was also acting Minister of Defense at the time. Again, therefore, it was Senghor who had overstepped the limits of his authority.

To disprove the prosecution’s charge that Dia really intended to overthrow the government, the defense pointed out that Dia sympathizers had control of the radio stations at Saint-Louis and Ziguinchor but did not use them to incite the people to rebellion. No attempt was made to raise an armed band against the President. Although numerous messages of sympathy from various parts of the interior reached Dia, none were broadcast over the national airwaves, even on December 17 and 18, 1962, when the Dia forces had effective control of radio facilities in Dakar. Dia said:

« I had a majority of the armed forces on my side, but I did not use them because I wanted at all costs to avoid a direct confrontation of force. It was to keep Senghor from so doing (i.e., ordering such a confrontation) that I had the telephone lines to the palace cut. What I asked, what I begged of God that day, was that Senegalese blood not be spilled. My prayer must have been heard for no Senegalese blood did flow. »

Speaking not so much for himself as on behalf of the four ministers who were being tried as his accomplices in the alleged coup d’état, Dia insisted that they were merely obeying the orders of their Prime Minister, and therefore should not be held at fault at all:

« I am not going to plead. I am going to explain. For six months we have heard only one version of the facts in the press, the radio, etc.—that of the accusers.
I am not a plotter . Consequently I have no accomplices. The friends who are around me are men who were faithful to their Prime Minister. They are men who are faithful to an ideal, a program we entered into with others…
When one undertakes a coup d’état, one does not let the chief of staff go off on a tour of inspection 3. One does not take three days to discuss the political situation with the party. One does not undertake to speak with the nation’s chief magistrate in an effort to find a peaceful solution to political problems…»

Dia spoke at length of the harmony which heretofore had existed between the party and the government because the primacy of the former had always been tacitly accepted. He said:

« If it were to be done over again, I would do the same thing to protect the party, the nation’s institutions, and the country. »

Then a murmur ran through the courtroom as Dia, looking directly at the judges, said:

« You do not have the real plotters before you.… »

The Prosecution’s Closing Statement

The prosecutor’s summation before the Court was brief. He recapitulated the events of December 14-18. Next, he conceded that the evidence brought out at the trial did not warrant retaining the charge against Dia that he had ordered an attack on the President’s palace. Accordingly, that particular charge against the defendant would be dropped.

Further, evidence of direct, overt complicity on the part of Ibrahima Sarr in the attempted coup d’état was so insubstantial that the prosecution was willing to withdraw all charges against this defendant.

Even so, an attempt against the security of the state had still been made. In expelling the deputies from the National Assembly and ordering the arrest of four of them, Mamadou Dia had flagrantly violated the Constitution. Yet the prosecutor recognized an element of innocence in Dia’s actions:

« I do not doubt that the former Prime Minister acted completely in good faith even when he committed the crimes against the Constitution for which he is being tried here today. At the time, he thought he was doing the right thing. But between what he thought was right and the law there was a gap, and what he did constituted a grave crime. »

Citing the words of Lamennais that “the holiest of causes becomes impious when one resorts to crime to make it triumph,” the prosecutor nevertheless felt that the High Court should consider extenuating circumstances in judging the former prime minister :

« During a certain time it seems that by a curious combination of factors due to his own personality, and the influence of those around him, the accused thought that the party, the nation, and Mamadou Dia enjoyed such intimate communion that one could not touch one without disturbing the others. In his soul and in his conscience he must have thought, “How can one be a good Senegalese when one is against Mamadou Dia?”

The Defense’s Final Word

The measured, dispassionate tones of the prosecutor’s presentation were brought into relief when the attorneys for the defense entered their final plea. In tones ranging from the theatrical gravity of Me. Badinter, Valdiodio N’Diaye’s lawyer, to the quivering Zola-like tones of Me. Baudet, Dia’s attorney, the defense attempted alternately to deny that a coup d’état had been attempted, and to justify the attempt on the rather untenable ground that “it was all a tragic mistake.” Coming on the heels of a hard-hitting, give-and-take debate with the prosecutor during four days of testimony, the lofty words of the French attorneys
defending Mamadou Dia and the four other accused had a hollow
ring.

The defendants themselves were of little help in the final battle. Valdiodio N’Diaye seemed to be the only one genuinely concerned with saving himself from conviction. The other defendants, Dia, Sarr, M’Baye, and Tall, all seemed solely concerned with justifying their actions for posterity. Sarr, apparently disappointed that the prosecutor was willing to withdraw charges against him, in stentorian voice called upon the Court to consider him as the equal, in innocence or guilt, of Mr. Dia. Just to make sure he was driving his point home, he launched into a diatribe against the Senghor government, calling it a police state; but to his chagrin he was cut short by the presiding judge, Joseph M’Baye, when his turn came to speak before the bar, shouted at the judges that he was proud to be at the side of Mamadou Dia during this crisis. Alioune Tall remained as inconspicuous in the final plea as he had throughout most of the trial.

When Mamadou Dia came before the bar he said simply:

« I have only to await calmly the judgment of the High Court. I consider that the charges which have been made against me are unjustified . However I affirm that if my condemnation will serve my country in that it prevents it from falling into ridicule, then I am ready to accept this condemnation now. But I hope that at least my friends will be spared. »

The Court’s Verdict

After an hour and a half of deliberation, the seven judges filed back into the courtroom. In precise tones, Ousmane Goundiam, President of the High Court, read to each of the accused the various charges which had been retained by the Court against him. After each charge, he read the Court’s decision 4.

Mamadou Dia was found guilty on five counts:

  1. Ordering the expulsion of the deputies from the National Assembly
  2. Ordering the arrest of four deputies without warrant
  3. Cutting the telephone lines to the President1s palace
  4. Usurping and illegally retaining military authority
  5. Perpetrating arbitrary acts against several citizens in violation of the Constitution

Ibrahima Sarr was found guilty of complicity on all counts accepted against Mr. Dia.

Joseph M’Baye was found guilty of complicity in the cutting of the telephone lines to the President’s palace.

Valdiodio N’Diaye was found guilty of complicity in the usurpation and illegal retention of military authority.

Alioune Tall was found guilty of complicity in ordering arbitrary acts against several citizens in violation of the Constitution.

The Sentence

Mamadou Dia was condemned to life imprisonment in a military fortress.

Ibrahima Sarr, Joseph M’Baye, and Valdiodio N’Diaye were
each sentenced to 20 years’ imprisonment.

Alioune Tall was sentenced to five years’ imprisonment and the loss of civil rights for ten years .

Reflections on the Dia Trial

The trial of Mamadou Dia was a difficult experience for the young state of Senegal. It would perhaps have been better if it had never taken place at all; that way the nation might have been spared the agony which this trial inflicted on everyone, and Senegal would not have lost the services of one of its ablest men. But the train of events on December 17, 1962, was such that in the end the trial was the only logical conclusion to a series of actions which had gained a momentum of its own. Once Mamadou Dia took the drastic steps of expelling the deputies from the National Assembly, arresting four of them, and then barricading himself in the Administration Building, he could not retreat. And once Senghor ordered the arrest of Dia and his ministers, the only thing left was to bring them to trial. Thus the two men precipitated a chain reaction which, once started, neither could stop. Yet one cannot help pondering the “ifs” of this case. What might have happened if Mamadou Dia had allowed his government to be voted out of office and then had gone before the National Council at Rufisque on December 20 to present his case to the party; or what the situation would have been if Senghor had agreed with his Prime Minister that a motion of censure was unreceivable during the existing state of emergency.

To a foreigner witnessing this trial there were certain disturbing elements. The quality of justice, embodied in the presiding magistrate’s concern for proper respect for procedure, declined sharply after the first day. Defendants and witnesses were allowed to argue interminably with one another, with but scant attention to the Court to whom they were supposed to address all their remarks. On numerous occasions during the trial, attorneys for the defense interrupted the prosecutor’s discourse, not to express an objection to a point raised, but to deliver orations of their own. Rarely were they called to order or even given so much as a slight reprimand from the hench. At such moments one became sorely aware of the judge’s lack of a gavel.

More disturbing still were the several anomalies arising from the trial itself. With the exception of the presiding magistrate, all of the men who sat in judgment on Mamadou Dia had voted to depose the Dia government; one of them, Théophile James, was himself the author of the censure motion against Dia. Of the 39 deputies who had not participated in the censure vote, not one had been named to serve as a judge. Attempts by counsel for the defense to effect a change in the make-up of the High Court were rejected—by the High Court itself.
Thus good reasons exist for doubting the impartiality of the Court.

Then, too, there was the severity of the sentences — sentences pronounced in spite of the prosecutor’s own moderate closing statement asking the High Court to drop all charges against Sarr and to consider extenuating circumstances in judging Dia and the other defendants. Evidently the Court wanted to make absolutely sure that Dia, Sarr, Valdiodio N’Diaye, and the others would be removed permanently from the Senegalese political scene. Had the death penalty still been in force in Senegal, there is little doubt that an even harsher fate would have been meted out to Dia and perhaps to one or two of the ether defendants.

In view of these facts, it is not surprising that many who were present asked themselves, “Was this a real trial whose object was to search for the truth and then to deal justly with that truth? Or was it a bogus trial—another show trial designed for the gallery and for the foreign press— intended to prove to the world that Senegal was a free and liberal democracy? Was it simply an attempt to discredit Mamadou Dia and throw a mantle of legitimacy over malodorous political acts perpetrated by men who, afraid of Dia, wanted him out of the way at all costs? Men who, certain in advance of the outcome, were willing to stage a public trial to gain their ends ?”

These questions, in all fairness, cannot be answered by a simple “Yes” or “No.” Certainly there were disturbing aspects of this case which would have aroused the doubts of any thinking person about the quality of the justice administered. But there were also other aspects that spoke highly for the Senegalese. No one who attended the trial could fail to be impressed by the openness and conscientiousness with which such basic questions as the validity of the doctrine of party supremacy and the relations between party and government we re discussed. The defense was given every opportunity to express its point of view, frankly and without hindrance, on every pertinent issue and to cross-examine all witnesses. And it availed itself fully of this right—indeed, so much so, that at one point during the defense’s closing plea, one of the attorneys, Omar Diop, used the occasion not so much to defend his client as to deliver a slashing attack against the Senghor administration. Moreover, much to the credit of all of the Senegalese parties concerned, colonialism—the favorite whipping boy in African political trials—was never once so much as mentioned during the five days of the Dia trial.

In a part of the world where passions are easily aroused, where a trial of this sort ran the very real risk of setting off strife between different segments of the nation’s ethnic and religious communities, and where at any given moment anti-government demonstrations might have been inspired, the decision even to hold a trial took a great deal of courage on the part of President Senghor. For those of us foreigners who witnessed it, the trial of Mamadou Dia may not have fulfilled our own private notions of what constitutes justice. Nor, as far as the Senegalese themselves are concerned, may it necessarily have established the right of constitutional law over the doctrine of party supremacy. But one very important thing did emerge from this trial: a principle that even the highest personalities of a nation may be called to answer for their actions before a court of law. For an African country, groping to find its way toward a genuinely liberal democracy, this is a step ahead—a stumbling step perhaps, but also a brave and hopeful one.

Notes
1. Article 24 of the Senegalese Constitution stipulates, among other things, that “The President of the Republic is the Chief of the Armed Forces” (paragraph 7).
2. Article 48, paragraph 2, of the Senegalese Constitution, in force at the time, reads: “In the case of disagreement between the Government and the Assembly, the Supreme Court, at the request of one or the other, gives a ruling within eight days.”
3. The reference here was to General Fall, who had been away on an inspection of military posts in the interior a week before December 17.
4. The High Court’s decisions were in all cases taken by the vote of an absolute majority of its members, determined by secret ballot. The exact vote count on the various charges retained by the High Court against each of the defendants was never made public.

Next, The Trial of Mamadou Dia. Part III: Aftermath of the Trial